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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We took delivery of our new leased 2020 Odyssey EX-L just before the whole Coronavirus/COVID-19 thing hit in full force. The first thing I noticed/hated was the lack of charging ports/Android auto connection in the center stack of the dash and the lack of a way to get cables out of the center console without leaving the door open. This frustration led me to tackle the anxiety inducing project of tearing apart the dash and center console of our two week old van! I tried to so everything in a way that would likely pass an end of lease inspection once removed. We'll probably keep this one at the end of the lease but you never know. Thanks so much to those who came before me and helped me gain some confidence in taking on this task. The posts by 9rpp and Novalight helped a ton! I wanted to give back to the club by posting my project with photos and some tips that would have helped speed things up for me. Over the years I've had bad luck with photo hosting sites closing down and losing my pics so I'm going to attempt to explain everything more thoroughly in words too in case the pics disappear at some point. I've put them on Google Pics so hopefully Alphabet/Google doesn't go under anytime soon! (update: thanks to serega12 I learned that we can now embed ten pics per post, contrary to the old post I found on here explaining how to upload pics). The most helpful pics are embedded with links to all pics) I recommend reading through the whole thing before starting in case I didn't sequence things quite right or you have some better ideas than what I came up with. I wish I had taken more pics along the way but I get impatient sometimes. Here it goes!

Items used:

Two Micro-USB cables, Anker Powerline+. (wireless charger phone mount and Echo Auto). I've found these cables and connectors to be very durable and to work in old worn out devices that refused to charge with other cables.
USB Type-C cable, Anker Powerline+ for when I want to use Android Auto or have my phone charge as fast as possible. I used 6 ft cables and they barely reached. I recommend 10ft cables if you're buying new ones for the project.
3 port USB 12V charger, Anker.
12V Extension cord, EPAUTO 12ft. $9.97 on Amazon. I used a 6ft and it also barely reached. If I could do it again I would get the 12ft cable to give me more slack in the center console.
Add-a-circuit, low profile mini fuse
Ring terminal. I only had a 12-10 ga 3/8" on hand. 1/4" is a bit too small and my 3/8" was a bit bigger than needed but worked okay. Ideally you should have a 16-14 ga (blue) 5/16" ring.
Socket wrench, 10mm socket, 12mm deep socket, 6 inch extension. A longer extension might have allowed me to operate the wrench completely outside the console instead of banging around inside.
Assorted files
Ridgid Job Max with Multi-tool head and cutting blade. I was going to use my drill but it wouldn't fit inside the center console. I later learned that I could probably have reached from underneath.
Wooden baseball bat to hold up console.



Phase 1: Remove dash panels. Thankfully everything is held in with spring clips that seem to hold up well to repeated removal and installation. Here is a great video link from fellow club member Novalight. Thanks so much!

Novalights awesome dash removal video!

Using a dash trim removal tool, flat head screwdriver, or bottle opener like the video, starting near the passenger door gently pry out the silver trim piece from the top. Once you have it started pull straight out, working your way towards the center of the van. There is only a single row of spring clips holding the trim in place.

Using the same tool as before gently pry the small silver trim piece out between the instrument cluster and radio display.

Once the silver trim is removed open the glove box, grab the lower main dash trim (holds the shift buttons, etc.) just above the glove box and pull straight out. There is a row of spring clips at the top edge and the bottom edge holding the lower dash in place. Near the radio display you will need to pull the bottom edge out a bit to get both top and bottom clips free and then pull down slightly to clear the bottom edge of the radio/climate controls. The part around the radio comes out kind of hard. It took a lot of faith in the video to keep me moving forward with the project but I got it done! Be sure not to pull out the dash piece too far. You will need to unhook all six electrical connectors before pulling it away. There are small spring tabs on each connector that you hold down to release them while pulling them apart. This is the newest vehicle I've attempted a project like this and I was amazed at how easily they came out! Once all connectors are removed carefully place the dash in a safe place to avoid scratches. I put mine in the back seat.

Here is a pic of the dash with the silver trim and lower dash piece removed.

Dash pieces removed


Odyssey 05.jpg




PHASE 2: Remove center console.

First, remove your floor mats. It makes it easier to remove the side panels of the lower center console tray near the floor. Remove side panels of lower console tray. Grab the very slim top inside edge of the side panel near the back where it meets the main center console compartment and pull straight out. Once the top edge is free pull out the bottom edge and work your way forward. I found out the hard way that the console doesn't lift up very far without these removed.

Remove the rubber liner for the center tray. There is a tab on the drivers side near the front to help you get started. It kind of pops in place so it takes a bit of effort to get it started. Don't be afraid, just pull hard and it will pop free.

Center tray rubber liner pull tab



Remove the two 10mm bolts in the lower tray area. The little pockets in the middle of the passenger side door worked perfectly to hold my bolts so they wouldn't get lost.

Center tray bolts (removed)



Remove the rubber liner for the center console main compartment. There is a pull tab in the middle of the rear edge where the compartment comes to a "V".

Remove the two 10mm bolts in the main compartment.

Main Console bolts (removed)



Remove the driver side kick panel on the side of the center stack. Grab at the rear edge and pull straight out, working your way forward. The panel is held in place by spring clips and a single large tab up by the gas pedal. Once the spring clips are all free just pull the panel towards the rear to remove.


PHASE 3: Cut the cable passage in the center console. Start by lifting up the console and supporting it with something. After initially using my drill bit box under the back edge of the console I had the bright idea to lift the console really high and slide a baseball bat under the console and rest bat on the seats. It worked perfectly and gave me plenty of room to work and not worry about damaging the floor of the van while cutting. This cutting was pretty scary on my wife's brand new leased van. I picked a spot that would almost certainly go unnoticed on the end of lease inspection. There is a large ridge/hump that the console bolts to leaving almost no room to route cables without them getting squished. I cut a narrow rectangular hole in the front driver side edge of the console floor so that the rubber liner will conceal the hole. This location also barely allows enough room for the cables to clear the metal hump. I used my Ridgid Job Max with Multi-tool head and a cutting blade to cut the hole. You could probably lift the console high enough to use a regular drill from below if you measure carefully enough from the bolt holes. Maybe drill a small pilot hole a bit further back than needed to get your bearings and then work your way forward. I used a vice grip pliers to pry off the pieces from below after making the cuts. After the hole was cut I filed down the rough edges to prevent abrasions on the cables. I scraped up the front side of the inside of my console a bit in the process. Try draping a towel or something over the console to protect the inside while filing.

Console supported by bat

Odyssey 09.jpg


Job Max and File



Completed cable passage

Odyssey 11.jpg



PHASE 4: Route the cables.

Cut the cigarette lighter plug off the extension cord. I removed the plug tip and fuse and slid the plug down so I could clip the cable right where it meets the metal pieces to give me as much length as possible. Starting inside the console route the wire and your charging cables through the hole you just created and along the drivers side of the center console, up the center stack, and through the round hole in the dash. If you got the longer power cable I would advise leaving about a foot of power cable inside the console. I only left about four inches. The cable is a bit stiff and didn't allow me to lay the power socket down flat on the floor like I had wanted. Remove the panel under the steering column. I only needed to pull out the right side of the panel and left it hanging by the left side. Route the power cable under the steering column and around to the fuse boxes and brake bracket. Be sure to leave enough length on your cables to reach the original power sockets for your Android Auto cable!

Under console with cables

Cables run along driver side of console

Wires through circular dash hole

Odyssey 15.jpg


Power wire under steering column



Strip the wires on the power cord. Attach the ring terminal to the ground wire and the Add-a-circuit to the positive wire. Bend the terminal about 60 degrees right where the ring meets the barrel of the connector so the connector will clear the brake bracket and still allow the nut to fit on. Use 12mm deep socket to remove the lower left nut by the brake pedal and install ground wire terminal. Insert the Add-a-circuit to fuse slot #33 if you want your 12V outlet switched with the ignition. When I started the project I didn't realize there were TWO fuse panels under the drivers side dash. I didn't strip my cable sheathing far enough back to reach the second panel with the switched power so I settled for a continuously powered fuse slot that I could reach on the lower fuse panel. After a few hours the night before and a few hours the second day with my three year old son "helping" I didn't have the energy to unbolt my ground wire again to do it "properly"!

Fuse panels and wiring

Odyssey 14.jpg



PHASE 5: File down silver dash trim

I initially tried just pushing the dash trim into place over the cables. It stayed but popped out too easily for my tastes. I knew if anything was wonky with this my wife would be grumpy about me messing up her beautiful new van. (Pearl White with Mocha interior). There is a little black plastic lip along the top edge of the dash trim piece. I used a rough file (not pictured) to slowly take off enough material for my three cables to fit past. Amazingly I didn't even need to get into the silver part to make it work properly. The filed out notch is only about 2mm by 10mm. The filed out notch is in the top right of the photo. I looked up the part online and MSRP is only $14.39 if I need to replace it at the end of the lease. It isn't really noticeable so I think we'll be fine.

Silver Dash Trim with notch filed out

Odyssey 19.jpg



PHASE 6: Put it all back together!

Everything goes back together in reverse order. The only part that gave me some headaches was getting the lower dash piece to fit back in under the radio/climate controls. I unscrewed the bottom two screws holding the radio in to give it a little more "flex" going in. It took a lot of wiggling and trying different angles, along with a few pauses to take a deep breath and collect myself before getting frustrated and breaking something, to get it in but it eventually popped back in place. The clips on the far left seemed to need some extra "oomph" to get them back in place.

While I had it apart I also ran a second USB Type-C cable from inside the console coming out from under the console next to the passenger seat and up between the "Drop Stop" and the seat for the passenger to use. I love the Drop Stop for keeping stuff from falling between the seat and console. With this console not being removable and the gap so small I consider them a must have.

Here is the final result. I just tuck the USB Type-C cable into the vent when not in use. The Echo Auto is mounted behind the radio display. I think it turned out pretty slick! Hopefully this helps the next person fed up with ugly cable clutter.

Center Console with mat removed

Center Console with mat installed

Odyssey 18.jpg


Dash cables

Odyssey 20.jpg
 

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Thank you for the write up! BTW, this is probably the easiest forum to embed pictures on and it keeps them for you. No need to embed. Just FYI or if you want to edit and upload directly onto your first post. ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the write up! BTW, this is probably the easiest forum to embed pictures on and it keeps them for you. No need to embed. Just FYI or if you want to edit and upload directly onto your first post. ?
Thanks for the tip! Ten of the most helpful pics are now embedded. I searched the forum and found a great write up from long ago explaining how to upload pics. At the time you could only have one pic per post so I did links. Live and learn!
 

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Thanks for the tip! Ten of the most helpful pics are now embedded. I searched the forum and found a great write up from long ago explaining how to upload pics. At the time you could only have one pic per post so I did links. Live and learn!
Glad I could help! Now the write up looks even better! I couldn't bring myself to start drilling and filing the new dash, at least not yet! ?
 

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Thanks for the post!

Can I recommend you to use a crimp connector to replace the twist style maretts, or at least put tape over them? It scares me to see them hanging loose like that and I find they are not the best connection for small gauge stranded wires. They tend to come loose and being in a high vibration environment it may happen easier than expected.


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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the post!

Can I recommend you to use a crimp connector to replace the twist style maretts, or at least put tape over them? It scares me to see them hanging loose like that and I find they are not the best connection for small gauge stranded wires. They tend to come loose and being in a high vibration environment it may happen easier than expected.


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Good idea. On a lot of my installs I tend to prioritize being able to "leave no trace" when I pull them out. Maybe when I get around to taking it back apart to strip back the sheathing and move the add-a-circuit to the switched fuse location I'll upgrade to a better crimped connection. I agree that wire nuts aren't the best at securing things like tiny 22ga wires I've had good luck with them in all of my radio installs over the years as long as you use the proper sized wire nut, even on the small stuff. This power cord has 16ga wires and the add a circuit looks like 18ga. The picture makes it look worse than it actually is, the wires are partially tucked behind the fuse box. You would need to find a way to kick past the fuse box and brake pedal arm to reach it. That being said, it never hurts to shoot for a cleaner and more reliable/durable install.
 

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Good idea. On a lot of my installs I tend to prioritize being able to "leave no trace" when I pull them out. Maybe when I get around to taking it back apart to strip back the sheathing and move the add-a-circuit to the switched fuse location I'll upgrade to a better crimped connection. I agree that wire nuts aren't the best at securing things like tiny 22ga wires I've had good luck with them in all of my radio installs over the years as long as you use the proper sized wire nut, even on the small stuff. This power cord has 16ga wires and the add a circuit looks like 18ga. The picture makes it look worse than it actually is, the wires are partially tucked behind the fuse box. You would need to find a way to kick past the fuse box and brake pedal arm to reach it. That being said, it never hurts to shoot for a cleaner and more reliable/durable install.
At the very least I would recommend wrapping it with electrical tape to help secure them. Last thing you want is to have a short to diagnose.

I’m not sure if you have considered this yet or not so I’ll put bring this up also... If you are tapping into an existing circuit then I would highly suggest installing your Piggy Back fuse tap in the position that runs the two fuses in series with each other. I’ll attach a photo I drew up long ago, regarding another post, to help clarify what I mean.



Without knowing what ampacity the relay serving the switches source is capable of you run the risk of burning it out if you install the fuse in a parallel setup.... this turned into a long and elaborate debate with someone else who was basing their whole argument on the hope that the automotive manufactures would use oversized relays to control devices. They are taking a huge leap of faith with that approach and considering that larger relays cost more I would be highly opposed to blindly installing the piggy back in a parallel configuration without doing my homework first to make sure the circuit can handle a load when it faults out.

Another thing to consider (and you may already have because I haven’t checked to see what fuse numbers you suggested are run to), never install a piggy back fuse on a circuit used for safety. That would include airbag, horn, power steering, power breaks, etc...


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At the very least I would recommend wrapping it with electrical tape to help secure them. Last thing you want is to have a short to diagnose.

I’m not sure if you have considered this yet or not so I’ll put bring this up also... If you are tapping into an existing circuit then I would highly suggest installing your Piggy Back fuse tap in the position that runs the two fuses in series with each other. I’ll attach a photo I drew up long ago, regarding another post, to help clarify what I mean.



Without knowing what ampacity the relay serving the switches source is capable of you run the risk of burning it out if you install the fuse in a parallel setup.... this turned into a long and elaborate debate with someone else who was basing their whole argument on the hope that the automotive manufactures would use oversized relays to control devices. They are taking a huge leap of faith with that approach and considering that larger relays cost more I would be highly opposed to blindly installing the piggy back in a parallel configuration without doing my homework first to make sure the circuit can handle a load when it faults out.

Another thing to consider (and you may already have because I haven’t checked to see what fuse numbers you suggested are run to), never install a piggy back fuse on a circuit used for safety. That would include airbag, horn, power steering, power breaks, etc...


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Excellent point for cars that happen to run individual lines from the battery to each fuse or fuse section in a fuse block. I've never come across a car set up that way. Thankfully our vans run the fuse panels like a water header: large gauge wire to one of several fuse blocks and then smaller gauge wire to each load. It's hard to tell in the picture but the fuse block I used has a large gauge black wire feeding the fuse block in the lower left corner. It seems like it's around a ten or an eight gauge. I wound up not actually tapping off of an existing circuit since Honda was nice enough to leave us a lot of open slots, especially for those of us who couldn't or wouldn't afford an Elite. I could have pulled the extra fuse but I figured I'd leave it there as a ready spare. The one I'm plugged into is normally a 15A slot for the heated windshield which my EX-L lacks. Also, this is a smaller load that would normally have been run through the existing Accessory circuit, it's just running through my cable instead of through the 12V power outlet on the center stack of the dash. The safety issues you mention should only crop up if someone were to try running something big like a stereo amp off an existing fuse block with an add-a-circuit or if they tried using a vampire tap on the wire of an existing load.
 

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Excellent point for cars that happen to run individual lines from the battery to each fuse or fuse section in a fuse block. I've never come across a car set up that way. Thankfully our vans run the fuse panels like a water header: large gauge wire to one of several fuse blocks and then smaller gauge wire to each load. It's hard to tell in the picture but the fuse block I used has a large gauge black wire feeding the fuse block in the lower left corner. It seems like it's around a ten or an eight gauge. I wound up not actually tapping off of an existing circuit since Honda was nice enough to leave us a lot of open slots, especially for those of us who couldn't or wouldn't afford an Elite. I could have pulled the extra fuse but I figured I'd leave it there as a ready spare. The one I'm plugged into is normally a 15A slot for the heated windshield which my EX-L lacks. Also, this is a smaller load that would normally have been run through the existing Accessory circuit, it's just running through my cable instead of through the 12V power outlet on the center stack of the dash. The safety issues you mention should only crop up if someone were to try running something big like a stereo amp off an existing fuse block with an add-a-circuit or if they tried using a vampire tap on the wire of an existing load.
... or if there’s a small short like a wire rubbing the chassis causing a drain but poor enough connection to blow the fuse. Add that with a normal amperage and it could cause damage. It’s all hypothetical and you can play out whatever scenario you want to prove any point really. Being in a sector of an industry where I am tasked with repairing these sorts of issues I can tell you I’ve seen it before.

Keeping in mind I have not looked at this vans wiring schematic I can only make assumptions based off of what I’ve seen. I’ve seen fuse boxes that are not supplied by a large cable like you brought up, being split up using a buss bar type arrangement and feeding multiple fuses in parallel. If the fuse panel was fed from a single power cable then branches off through each fuse then I would assume the whole fuse box would be switched. They would use a large relay to make a set of contacts when the accessory is turned on. For your other fuse box that you are currently installed onto it sounds like that one is always powered. So every fuse in that box is powered if it is off of a buss bar.

If that doesn’t sound correct then it would be worth a second look at the wiring diagram to confirm the setup.

If it does sound correct then as long as the connection from the fuse terminal to the buss bar is sufficient awg or directly connected , and sufficiently sized for additional load then you should be good either way.

It’s not the additional load of the device that you are worried about here. It’s in the event that something fails is what you are planning for. Could be a shorted connection in the component that gets plugged in or any other type of failure.

Anyway, sounds like I’m preaching to the choir so not much point to continue, at this point I’m really just adding these comments for other people who may not have much experience in these types of modifications and giving them food for thought to be safe with their projects.


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