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It is suggested that we turn on the AC periodically to excersize the seals-- preventing them from drying out and loosing the coolent.
Selecting the defrost automaticly turns on the AC, but what about the rear?? Does the freeon flow to the rear register whenever the front is on? or is there a machanical in-line cutoff on the hose?
Should we be turning on the AC to the rear from time to time to lube the seals (if any?
 

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The seals that need attention are the shaft seals on the compressor. If the compressor is not run periodically the shaft weight can deform these seals enough to cause leakage of the r134a refrigerant. Do not worry about the rear a/c. There is only one compressor.
 

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I recall a '76 Plymouth Monaco that would automatically energize the AC clutch for about 5 seconds every time you turned off the ignition, winter or summer. I'm sure that was intended to keep the seals lubricated.
I doubt that is the case with the Odyssey.
 

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The shafts weight is carried by the shaft bearings not the seals. Deforming of the seals from the weight of the shaft is a new one on me. The AC system shaft seals may tend to stick to the shaft and be damage on startup of rotation of the compressor and leak if the seals are not kept lubricated by running the system on a regular basis however. The seals will also deteriorate over time regardless of how often the system is operated, but life will be greatly extended by keeping them lubricated.
-Mark


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Canodyssey:
The seals that need attention are the shaft seals on the compressor. If the compressor is not run periodically the shaft weight can deform these seals enough to cause leakage of the r134a refrigerant. Do not worry about the rear a/c. There is only one compressor.</font>
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'96 Maxima SE(Mods: FSTB, RSTB, RSB, Winter Blizzaks on GXE rims).
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[This message has been edited by Aardvaark (edited 02-28-2002).]
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Canodyssey:
Do not worry about the rear a/c. There is only one compressor.</font>

I thought there was a complete AC and heater unit for the rear located under the right sidepanels. (Maybe I misunderstood the salesman who was explaining everything about the van to us.)
 

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On the other end of the spectrum, for those living in tropical climates, it is a good idea to run the heat now in then so that fresh coolant gets run through the heater core. This helps prevent corrosion and premature failure.

Stay warm dudes, 46 degrees in South Florida this morning.

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Craig
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by htown:

I thought there was a complete AC and heater unit for the rear located under the right sidepanels. (Maybe I misunderstood the salesman who was explaining everything about the van to us.)

</font>
The A/C compresor is bolted to and is run off of the engine. That's where it gets its power. There would be no good way to power a second compressor in the rear (second engine? electric motor?) not to mention that they aren't small. The other parts are duplicated in the rear though, so it can run independantly of the front.


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D Schaefer
1999 Odyssey EX - Mesa Beige, 9" TV/VCR w/Steel Horse Tote, SmartScreen rear delay wiper in process
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Odyssey A/C has one Compressor (belt driven from engine) but two separate evaporators (one in the dash and one in the right rear quarter with the rest of the rear HVAC. One compressor is all that is needed if it is big enough. It's the evaporators that make cold air.

As far as exercising the system, I'd run both front and rear (it only takes several minutes). Refrigerant is a moisture magnet (kind of like brake fluid is. Not only that, but the combo of refrigerant and moisture is very corrosive. That's why all A/C systems have a little muffler-looking deal called a Filter/Dryer. Don't ask me how that works, (that's one of those "then a miracle occurs" processes) but it has somthing to do with the fact that the whole system operates in a vacuum. Anyway, running the whole A/C system will keep moisture from finding an insideous hiding place to do damage. Also there are O-ring seals in the hose and line connections.

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As an engineer, I feel compelled to jump in here whether I really know something or not!

The filter/dryer unit has dessicant in it that absorbs the moisture in the system. Think of it as little white packets of dessicant that comes in all electronic equipment packages that say "Do not Ingest" on them, only in a much bigger package!

A filter is often included to strain out any metal shavings coming from the compressor, so they are not continually ingested by the compressor causing premature failure.

In any case, in addition to two evaporator cores, there are two heater cores also. One in front and one in back.

Now, lets explore how the air conditioning system really works..... NOT!
 
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