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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
So unfortunately I'm having to replace my ignition lock cylinder. I'm ordering the new replacement cylinder on RockAuto (link) and my main question is regarding whether or not I'll need to pay a locksmith to program this thing once I install it. The new cylinder comes with 3 keys, but I don't think any of those keys have a chip in them and my current key has a chip (non-remote key), however I doubt that will be any issue. I'm really hoping this will just be plug & play and won't require me spending a fortune on a locksmith. I've already removed the old cylinder, currently waiting on the one from RockAuto in the mail.
 

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2007 Odyssey EX-L
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The car needs a reading from the chip in your current key to run, so yes, you will need to get it programmed.

Just an idea. I have no idea if this will work. But, what if you tape your current OE key with the active chip right next to the steering column, or straight up tape it at a 90 degree or 180 degree angle over your new keys (that way it doesn't get in the way of entering the new key into the ignition). Will the chip be read and the car will work? I thought it was the ECU that needed to be programmed to read the chip, not the ignition cylinder itself.

I just bought an ignition lock cylinder for my 2001 Toyota the other day from RockAuto. The key is having difficulty turning after 19 years of use, I guess. Luckily for me, that car does not have chipped keys.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The car needs a reading from the chip in your current key to run, so yes, you will need to get it programmed.

Just an idea. I have no idea if this will work. But, what if you tape your current OE key with the active chip right next to the steering column, or straight up tape it at a 90 degree or 180 degree angle over your new keys (that way it doesn't get in the way of entering the new key into the ignition). Will the chip be read and the car will work? I thought it was the ECU that needed to be programmed to read the chip, not the ignition cylinder itself.

I just bought an ignition lock cylinder for my 2001 Toyota the other day from RockAuto. The key is having difficulty turning after 19 years of use, I guess. Luckily for me, that car does not have chipped keys.
Honestly that's one of the first things I thought of doing when I started looking into fixing the issue myself. If the chip is store in the base of the key, I can just chop off the metal part of the key itself and tape it directly to the back of the new key that isn't programmed. That way the chip is still active. However it still leaves me questioning whether the lock cylinder itself has any programming. Because if you think about it, the new cylinder won't be able to be unlocked from the old key, that is unless the chip communicates to a completely different part and the cylinder itself just does what the immobilizer tells it to do.
 

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Since the new ignition switch also comes with a new immobilizer receiver built into it It's likely that the replacement keys WILL have a chip in them that can be programmed. The immobilizer reads the chip in the key and sends that info to the PCM which decides if it's right and will allow the vehicle to be started. You might be able to get away with taping or zip tying the old key to the new ignition switch so that it's always reading the old key but if ever that key falls off or moves slightly out of place you'll be left with a no-start condition...this usually makes a spouse quite irritated!

I would recommend just paying someone to program all the new keys to the vehicle. The one time cost will make life easier down the road.

The keys are programmed into the PCM.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This issue has been resolved. I ended up painstakingly removing the chip out of the old key and gluing it to the new key. Doing so saved me about $200 not having to get a new key programmed and made.

A tip to anyone that’s thinking about doing this; make sure you have the chip facing the ignition and positioned as if it was in the old key. So make sure you remember what direction the chip was facing inside the key.
 
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