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Discussion Starter #1
I sold my 2015 Touring last year in May but kept the VCMuzzlerII. This week picked up 2018 Ody EXL and want to install VCMuzzlerII on my new Odyssey. Did anyone install VCMuzzlerII on their 2018 year model? If yes, how did you remove the engine cover? Seems it is hard to install the muzzler with the engine cover on.

Thanks in advance.
Roman
 

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I have about 4500 miles on my EX-L and I don't think I have ever felt the engine switch into 3-cylinder operation. Is this really still an issue for Honda?
 

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It's becoming clearer and clearer that the VCM3 system on the 2018+ Odyssey is a vast improvement over the older VCM2 system that the gen 4 Ody got. With that said, I can understand, for example, why folks might like all 6 cylinders working all the time in a vehicle as big and heavy as an Odyssey.

The need to shut down VCM does not seem as urgent as it once was but that doesn't mean there aren't any reasons to not do it. Fortunately, it now seems to be more of a question of preference.
 

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I wish there was a way to check how many cylinders you're using. Like GM products (v8/v4 indicators)

Is there a way to know if the vehicle is working in v3 mode?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Installed VCMuzzlerII about 100 miles ago and the vehicle performs much better when accelerating. I'm surprised there is not much talk about VCMuzzlerII on 2018 Odyssey. There is more talk about it on Ridgeline/Pilot forums. I believe it's the same engine. The only bad part about VCM on the new Ody models vs previous model years, there is no light that comes up letting the driver know if they are on 3 or 6 cylinders.
 

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If I cannot tell when VCM is activated without a visual indicator, how would I know it performs much better with VCM disabled permanently?
 

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I would occasionally feel a vibration when I was coasting and I felt the car did not accelerate well from a stop or when trying to get back up to speed. With the MuzzlerII I no longer have any vibration when coasting and you can feel the improved acceleration which I presume is because you have all six cylinders working and not three and then six. It just runs better.
 

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I can feel the VCM kick in during light acceleration around 40-50mph.

Does the VCM muzzler require changing the resistance connectors for each season of extreme climate change?

My only concern with this modification is if you actually overheated your engine the light wouldn’t come on until it’s too late. Actual engine temps of 270deg would only report 216deg on the cars computer and temp gauge.


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It's becoming clearer and clearer that the VCM3 system on the 2018+ Odyssey is a vast improvement over the older VCM2 system that the gen 4 Ody got. With that said, I can understand, for example, why folks might like all 6 cylinders working all the time in a vehicle as big and heavy as an Odyssey.

The need to shut down VCM does not seem as urgent as it once was but that doesn't mean there aren't any reasons to not do it. Fortunately, it now seems to be more of a question of preference.
I am not sure how you arrived at this conclusion.
VCM2 was introduced 2008 of Gen3 models and carried fully into Gen4.
Long term effects of VCM only become reality after driving many miles.
Nobody, including Honda can predict what the long term effects of the technology are. It works perfect in theory, but as VCM2 reality is here to attest, it did not work out so well for Honda.
I am also not sure if 18+ are using VCM2,3 or whatever else.
Honda went full mute mode on their VCM info, nothing beyond the fact that engine has VCM on their web site.

Based on previous experience, I would still recommend muzzling the car.
Just remember that there are side benefits, such as full power at all times, less Active engine mount activations, etc...

If new generation of Ody has similar issues in 60-80k miles as current one, it will take another class action lawsuit to get Honda to respond.
 

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I am not sure how you arrived at this conclusion.
VCM2 was introduced 2008 of Gen3 models and carried fully into Gen4.
Long term effects of VCM only become reality after driving many miles.
Nobody, including Honda can predict what the long term effects of the technology are. It works perfect in theory, but as VCM2 reality is here to attest, it did not work out so well for Honda.
I am also not sure if 18+ are using VCM2,3 or whatever else.
Honda went full mute mode on their VCM info, nothing beyond the fact that engine has VCM on their web site.

Based on previous experience, I would still recommend muzzling the car.
Just remember that there are side benefits, such as full power at all times, less Active engine mount activations, etc...

If new generation of Ody has similar issues in 60-80k miles as current one, it will take another class action lawsuit to get Honda to respond.
I don't disagree with a single thing you have written here. If I were buying a 2018+ Odyssey myself, I would almost certainly muzzle the VCM - I don't think the fuel savings are worth the potential hassle. But my personal biases aren't really important here; I'm trying to be objective.

But I do believe that cautious optimism is appropriate at this point in time. The current generation Acura TLX, and Honda Odyssey, Pilot and Ridgeline all use the same J35Y6 engine, which uses the VCM3 system. [LINK] There is a lot more mileage across the fleet of vehicles that uses this engine than we might initially think - it's been in the TLX since 2015. If the same kind of problems that the VCM2 engines suffered were going to happen, they'd be cropping up; if not in an Odyssey, then probably in a 3-4 year old TLX. There must be a few of those pushing 60,000 - 80,000 miles on the odometer by now. I don't go to the Acura forums, but I do skim over the Pilot and Ridgeline forums from time to time, and as far as I can tell they don't talk about VCM very much with the new models.

I also think VCM problems would be exposed and reported especially quickly because we are now looking at a much more savvy and experienced group of owners. Lots of people buying 2018+ Odysseys are coming out of 2011-2017 Odysseys, which means that they are familiar with VCM and how it works (or doesn't work). These people who come to forums like this are likely to be particularly sensitive to how VCM feels when they drive because they're likely to be aware of how bad it can get when things go sideways. I don't think we're getting very many "Oh no - here we go again" complaints - at least not so far.

You're absolutely right that no one knows what the future holds with these things - least of all me. After all, lots of people thought VCM2 was great until it started to become clear that it wasn't. So I will reserve the right to change my opinion if evidence that I am wrong starts to show up. I don't mind to admit when I'm wrong. I'm here trying to learn, just like everyone else.
 

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I don't disagree with a single thing you have written here. If I were buying a 2018+ Odyssey myself, I would almost certainly muzzle the VCM - I don't think the fuel savings are worth the potential hassle. But my personal biases aren't really important here; I'm trying to be objective.

But I do believe that cautious optimism is appropriate at this point in time. The current generation Acura TLX, and Honda Odyssey, Pilot and Ridgeline all use the same J35Y6 engine, which uses the VCM3 system. [LINK] There is a lot more mileage across the fleet of vehicles that uses this engine than we might initially think - it's been in the TLX since 2015. If the same kind of problems that the VCM2 engines suffered were going to happen, they'd be cropping up; if not in an Odyssey, then probably in a 3-4 year old TLX. There must be a few of those pushing 60,000 - 80,000 miles on the odometer by now. I don't go to the Acura forums, but I do skim over the Pilot and Ridgeline forums from time to time, and as far as I can tell they don't talk about VCM very much with the new models.

I also think VCM problems would be exposed and reported especially quickly because we are now looking at a much more savvy and experienced group of owners. Lots of people buying 2018+ Odysseys are coming out of 2011-2017 Odysseys, which means that they are familiar with VCM and how it works (or doesn't work). These people who come to forums like this are likely to be particularly sensitive to how VCM feels when they drive because they're likely to be aware of how bad it can get when things go sideways. I don't think we're getting very many "Oh no - here we go again" complaints - at least not so far.

You're absolutely right that no one knows what the future holds with these things - least of all me. After all, lots of people thought VCM2 was great until it started to become clear that it wasn't. So I will reserve the right to change my opinion if evidence that I am wrong starts to show up. I don't mind to admit when I'm wrong. I'm here trying to learn, just like everyone else.
Thanks for the link, good x-ref on all the j35 applications.
As the say, proceed with caution :)
I agree with your logic here.
 

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Long term issues from previous model years are well documented, I get that. But I am skeptical of the "immediate benefits" reported. Prior to getting the van I had a 2007 Accord, which was equipped with an J30A5; 2007 was the last model year the North American Accord was equipped with a non-VCM V6. Transitioning to the van was seamless, I have not noticed any hesitation or vibration relative to the sedan I drove for ten years on the same highways and backroads. I am not saying that there is no difference, I can only state that I do not perceive a difference.
 

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My only concern with this modification is if you actually overheated your engine the light wouldn’t come on until it’s too late. Actual engine temps of 270deg would only report 216deg on the cars computer and temp gauge.
That is why I like the S-VCM Controller!! It is not resistor based. It is some type of computer chip or module device. If the engine overheats why you are driving, the S-VCM will bypass itself to let the true coolant temp show on the drivers dashboard. The onboard computer will also get true signal readings from the coolant temp sensor. So if you are using a scangauge or other digital gauge, you will know your true temperature.
 

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That is why I like the S-VCM Controller!! It is not resistor based. It is some type of computer chip or module device. If the engine overheats why you are driving, the S-VCM will bypass itself to let the true coolant temp show on the drivers dashboard. The onboard computer will also get true signal readings from the coolant temp sensor. So if you are using a scangauge or other digital gauge, you will know your true temperature.
Thanks. I just ordered it. https://www.svcmcontroller.com


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I installed the S-VCM Controller today. To be honest, it feels like a flimsy piece of junk. But, as long as it works and lasts, I can overlook that. So far so good. Installation was easy. I took a test drive and the VCM didn't kick in.
 

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I installed the S-VCM Controller today. To be honest, it feels like a flimsy piece of junk. But, as long as it works and lasts, I can overlook that. So far so good. Installation was easy. I took a test drive and the VCM didn't kick in.
I can't even tell when the vcm kicks in lol. How do you know?

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I felt the vibrations (albeit very subtle) in the pedals and the steering wheel when VCM engaged. There was also a noticeable hesitation when the van was accelerating from a crusing speed (e.g., going up a hill or passing a car on the highway).

I have the VCMuzzler II btw. My wife is definitely not sensative at all when it comes to cars but even she said the van drives alot smoother now. I hooked up a scan tool to monitor the temps in order to verify its working. Temps sit around 165F, peaking at 167F in traffic or sitting at a stoplight. My understanding is that VCM won’t engage unless temps hit 168-169+




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I've never heard of the VCMuzzler before. Could you explain exactly what it does, how it works and if it voids the warranty? Thanks!
 
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