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Some repair/recondition, others replace.
 

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Ah, so you went the route of replacing it rather than reconditioning the old part?
Correct, I read a few months what @John Clark did a few years ago, but didn't wanted to deal with the whole opening and stuff ... My wife and the kids usually have a timer when I'm working on the car ....are u done yet....are u done yet...? I was like let me just take the easy way and call it a day. I still have the old around to play with...it was bad the stickiness...but it drive me nuts when something doesn't work correctly....it was pretty quick process. i was able to remove the clip with a metal scraper.
154877
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Correct, I read a few months what @John Clark did a few years ago, but didn't wanted to deal with the whole opening and stuff ... My wife and the kids usually have a timer when I'm working on the car ....are u done yet....are u done yet...? I was like let me just take the easy way and call it a day. I still have the old around to play with...it was bad the stickiness...but it drive me nuts when something doesn't work correctly....it was pretty quick process. i was able to remove the clip with a metal scraper. View attachment 154877
Ah, I read on YouTube someone recommended using a towel to get off the door handle clip, and it worked to perfection. I had it off in 10 seconds, no scratching to worry about. I used a microfiber cloth and stuck it behind the door handle, and then tugged down on it, which sent the clip flying out.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Alright, final update from me in this thread.

Went ahead and replaced the center roller on the door today. I wasn't having any of the symptoms of a bad roller, but there was some movement in the roller, so decided to do it anyway as preventative maintenance. I did notice when I took the old roller out there was definitely play in the yellow (now black) wheels, but they hadn't fallen off the post yet.

Anyway, I learned a few things doing it that I thought I'd share:

Even if you've turned the interior lights off so they don't turn on, if you leave the tailgate open after removing the taillight, make sure to turn the switch for the trunk light off. I didn't realize this until later on, when I was almost done with the job, but luckily it didn't drain the battery much and I was still able to start the car without issues.

When removing the screw in the front that holds the trim piece that covers the track, try grabbing the door handle with the door fully open, and then pull on it again when it's about halfway closed. This will stop the door in a place where you can get your screwdriver in there without the interior handle being in the way.

I used a plastic caulk remover tool to aid me in pulling off the tail light, but be persistent and wiggle it around a bit until you get it out. Definitely don't pull on the plastic around the tail light screws, it's thin and you don't want to break it.

Yet again, when you're removing the trim piece covering the track, rather than rolling down the window to get the door to only go back part way, use the same trick as with the screw, and with the door fully open, pull the door handle, and right as it's making the 90 degree turn on the track, pull on it again to stop it. This will put the door in a spot where it's open enough to push the panel forward, but it won't be in the way, so you won't have to worry about scratching the paint.

If you don't have anything else to support the door, the scissor jack that comes with the car happens to work great for this job, just put a towel or something on the jack surface so it doesn't damage the door.

I did try to remove the clip and knock the pin out without unbolting the bracket, and while I was successful in removing the clip, I didn't have a proper tool to hammer with to knock the pin out, so I decided to just mark it with a sharpie (even though my Odyssey is light blue a blue sharpie worked perfect!) and unbolt it.

Make sure the power door switch is set to OFF when you're working with the cables. You don't want to trigger the motor and lose your cable.

Interestingly enough, removing the cables were a breeze, even the first one. Putting the second cable on however, was a completely different story. Having an extra set of hands is very valuable when doing that.

The pin came out easy enough now that I was able to hammer on it properly. Even after getting it past the knurled bit it was stuck in there pretty good, so i used a nail to hammer on it the rest of the way. I also used some grease on the pin, spring, and where the pin slides through, to hopefully make it easier to press in, and make it easier to remove in the future. As I expected, it slid to the knurled part just fine, and after hammering it in all the way, it went in no problem at all. The clip got bent a little bit when I removed it, but I was able to make it work.

I was able to use the sharpie mark to get the alignment perfect on the first try, which was nice. No adjustment needed. Again, it helps to have an extra hand when tightening down the bolts to ensure it doesn't move.

Unlike some people who I saw do this, I did not have to perform the door reset procedure to get things back to normal.

The last thing is that make sure you align the track cover trim piece properly. It should be almost flush with the quarter panel below it. I had to remove mine and reattach it a couple times until I got the alignment perfectly. Also, when you're putting the bolt and screw back, put the bolt in, but don't tighten it all the way, just get it in there so it won't fall out. Then, tighten the screw all the way, and finally, tighten down the bolt all the way. The order is important.

All in all, took me a couple hours, but that's with time for finding the right socket sizes in my messy-to-say-the-least garage, as well as the time it took to get the second cable back in. If I did it again it would probably take me an hour max.
 

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Alright, final update from me in this thread.

Went ahead and replaced the center roller on the door today. I wasn't having any of the symptoms of a bad roller, but there was some movement in the roller, so decided to do it anyway as preventative maintenance. I did notice when I took the old roller out there was definitely play in the yellow (now black) wheels, but they hadn't fallen off the post yet.

Anyway, I learned a few things doing it that I thought I'd share:

Even if you've turned the interior lights off so they don't turn on, if you leave the tailgate open after removing the taillight, make sure to turn the switch for the trunk light off. I didn't realize this until later on, when I was almost done with the job, but luckily it didn't drain the battery much and I was still able to start the car without issues.

When removing the screw in the front that holds the trim piece that covers the track, try grabbing the door handle with the door fully open, and then pull on it again when it's about halfway closed. This will stop the door in a place where you can get your screwdriver in there without the interior handle being in the way.

I used a plastic caulk remover tool to aid me in pulling off the tail light, but be persistent and wiggle it around a bit until you get it out. Definitely don't pull on the plastic around the tail light screws, it's thin and you don't want to break it.

Yet again, when you're removing the trim piece covering the track, rather than rolling down the window to get the door to only go back part way, use the same trick as with the screw, and with the door fully open, pull the door handle, and right as it's making the 90 degree turn on the track, pull on it again to stop it. This will put the door in a spot where it's open enough to push the panel forward, but it won't be in the way, so you won't have to worry about scratching the paint.

If you don't have anything else to support the door, the scissor jack that comes with the car happens to work great for this job, just put a towel or something on the jack surface so it doesn't damage the door.

I did try to remove the clip and knock the pin out without unbolting the bracket, and while I was successful in removing the clip, I didn't have a proper tool to hammer with to knock the pin out, so I decided to just mark it with a sharpie (even though my Odyssey is light blue a blue sharpie worked perfect!) and unbolt it.

Make sure the power door switch is set to OFF when you're working with the cables. You don't want to trigger the motor and lose your cable.

Interestingly enough, removing the cables were a breeze, even the first one. Putting the second cable on however, was a completely different story. Having an extra set of hands is very valuable when doing that.

The pin came out easy enough now that I was able to hammer on it properly. Even after getting it past the knurled bit it was stuck in there pretty good, so i used a nail to hammer on it the rest of the way. I also used some grease on the pin, spring, and where the pin slides through, to hopefully make it easier to press in, and make it easier to remove in the future. As I expected, it slid to the knurled part just fine, and after hammering it in all the way, it went in no problem at all. The clip got bent a little bit when I removed it, but I was able to make it work.

I was able to use the sharpie mark to get the alignment perfect on the first try, which was nice. No adjustment needed. Again, it helps to have an extra hand when tightening down the bolts to ensure it doesn't move.

Unlike some people who I saw do this, I did not have to perform the door reset procedure to get things back to normal.

The last thing is that make sure you align the track cover trim piece properly. It should be almost flush with the quarter panel below it. I had to remove mine and reattach it a couple times until I got the alignment perfectly. Also, when you're putting the bolt and screw back, put the bolt in, but don't tighten it all the way, just get it in there so it won't fall out. Then, tighten the screw all the way, and finally, tighten down the bolt all the way. The order is important.

All in all, took me a couple hours, but that's with time for finding the right socket sizes in my messy-to-say-the-least garage, as well as the time it took to get the second cable back in. If I did it again it would probably take me an hour max.
Wow, thanks for sharing. Got any pics by any chance?
 

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Discussion Starter #26

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Discussion Starter #28
Here's a video showing the center roller replacement.

This has been posted in this thread before.

Eric's video shows how to unbolt the bracket and remove it - what I did. He unfortunately does not show stopping the door in the almost closed position to get the panel off.

Personally, I like Other Eric (South Main Auto)'s video on how to do this repair. While it doesn't show the same method of unbolting the bracket, instead showing how to knock the pin out with the bracket still bolted to the door, it does show how to stop the door when it's almost closed to get the panel off. In my opinion that trick alone is worth watching his video.
 

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With moving the door, just switch the master off, then move the door manually. And if you want pictures, here's my web page: Odyssey Rollers where I document doing it on my '99. Did the same on my brother's '07, only difference was that some screws were bolts and vice versa.
I didn't bother removing the hinge pin, but I found that often it was stiff and needed to be lubricated. And rather than replacing the entire roller assembly as some do, I just replaced the broken or missing rollers. Although it's documented in the 2nd Gen section for $5 roller repair, worked fine on my bro's 3rd gen.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
With moving the door, just switch the master off, then move the door manually. And if you want pictures, here's my web page: Odyssey Rollers where I document doing it on my '99. Did the same on my brother's '07, only difference was that some screws were bolts and vice versa.
I didn't bother removing the hinge pin, but I found that often it was stiff and needed to be lubricated. And rather than replacing the entire roller assembly as some do, I just replaced the broken or missing rollers. Although it's documented in the 2nd Gen section for $5 roller repair, worked fine on my bro's 3rd gen.
I've seen threads like that on the 3rd gen from back in '08. When you replace just the rollers, did you use the same kind of material as the stock rollers or is there something stronger?

Speaking of differences between this job on 2nd and 3rd gens

Why on earth did they decide to make the trim piece slide forward to release in 3rd gen? It was slide back on 2nd gen, and they went back to sliding back for 4th gen...
 

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I've seen somebody use metal rollers or bearings, but these are nylon- kinda like plastic. Don't know how long they last, maybe as long as the original? But they're so low cost and easy to replace.
Don't know about the engineering design choices between generations!
 
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