Honda Odyssey Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Due to my failure to properly rotate I have two OEM Michelins with a fair amount of tread left and two that are worn. I need to replace the two, and am considering going with another brand. Is this OK, or will the mismatch cause issues with ride, handling, etc.? If it is likely to cause a problem I'll just get Michelins to keep all four matched.

thanks,
bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
If you are on a budget and Ok with sub-optimum handling characteristics, it is done all the time. Being cheap I would do the same thing. But you want to try to get a tire that will be available for a couple of years so you can eventually match them up. Remember new ones in back, that way it doesn't have tendency to over-steer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
You'll be fine but just want to emphasize NEW TIRES ON THE REAR. If you want an extreme example of what could happen with a serious imbalance, try pushing a shopping cart from front to back (You know the ones that have swivel wheels in the front and fixed in the back).

I lost a family member because of worn rear tires while entering the highway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Dirkdaddy said:
If you are on a budget and Ok with sub-optimum handling characteristics, it is done all the time. Being cheap I would do the same thing. But you want to try to get a tire that will be available for a couple of years so you can eventually match them up. Remember new ones in back, that way it doesn't have tendency to over-steer.
Technically not an issue, but putting larger diameter (new vs old) on the back puts more weight on the front tires, thus adding to possible over-steer. But I again state, this is not an issue in the amount of diameter difference we're talking about.

The only problem with worn front/rear tire mismatch is ABS braking. The difference in diameters causes the sensors to reflect slightly different speeds, and this is where you can...I say can....get into trouble.

New tires on front or real...for the most part...doesnt matter. Its just not the best practice, and it is to be avoided if possible.

Were is my van, if the two old tires are in good shape, I'd put the new ones on the front for the best winter traction possible and let them wear down to match the rears. Then begin normal tire rotation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
FJRaccord said:
Technically not an issue, but putting larger diameter (new vs old) on the back puts more weight on the front tires, thus adding to possible over-steer. But I again state, this is not an issue in the amount of diameter difference we're talking about.

The only problem with worn front/rear tire mismatch is ABS braking. The difference in diameters causes the sensors to reflect slightly different speeds, and this is where you can...I say can....get into trouble.

New tires on front or real...for the most part...doesnt matter. Its just not the best practice, and it is to be avoided if possible.

Were is my van, if the two old tires are in good shape, I'd put the new ones on the front for the best winter traction possible and let them wear down to match the rears. Then begin normal tire rotation.
Don't take this as a personal attack but I have to disagree. While you are correct in stating that you will put more power to the ground by placing the new tires on the drive wheels, control is better maintained with the new tires on the rear. The logic is similar to the fact that a 4wd will not stop a car in the snow better than a 2wd will. Here's an article on tire placement http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=52 .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
It's best to place the new tires on the rear axle. I there is a blowout, a blowout on the front is a lot easier to control, since the steering wheel directly controls the tires. On the rear, a blowout is a lot harder to control, since the steering wheel has no control over the rear axle.

A friend of mine had a blowout on the rear axle and his truck skidded 360 degrees before he was able to control it. I recently had a blowout on my Civic on the front tire, at interstate speeds, and there was no problem with control. In fact, I barely noticed it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
The Tirerack article confirms to put a pair of new tires on the rear.

I am not 100% on board with their conclusion from one type of test. They only tested in a circle and in servere, constant, hydroplane condition. That takes a TON of water and speed to induce on a constant basis. They proved the fact in that test, but I'd like to see more real world testing in rain, slush and snow.

But until I can prove otherwise, I'll flip and go with Tireracks conclusion.


Blowouts though...that can happen on any tire...new or old...anytime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
True, blowouts do happen on new tires, but they are more likely on old tires, especially with age as the rubber can weaken. I did not see the Tirerack article; however, having good rubber on the rear is always better since the driver has little control over the rear tires, and you don't want the rear tires to lose traction. If the front wheels lose traction, one can control what happens by controlling the steering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Do not mix and match tire brands/compounds on the same axel. Further, I do not recommend going with different diameter wheels front and rear, however, as that will really affect handling.

To illustrate how, the Skip Barber racing schools do a skid pad exercise where they have put a larger diameter rim on the front than the rear on their RX-8's. Makes the car spin in a heartbeat.

Otherwise, while it isn't ideal, it can be done with no serious consequences.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top