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Discussion Starter #1
From John Eagle Honda in Houston:
Filter #15400-P0H-305 List $5.99 Cost $4.49
Washer #94109-14000 List $0.25 Cost $0.25
Tax $0.35
Total $5.09

From Wal-mart:
5 quarts of Pennzoil 10w30 oil Cost $8.30
Tax $0.60
Total $8.90

Materials Total $13.99

Time invested to buy materials and to actually change the oil and clean up was roughly 2 hours total.

$13.99 to change your own oil with conventional oil is not a bargain. I would personally recommend going to a Honda dealer that has a 30 minute $19.99 oil change for the first 10,000 miles or so and have them do it. After the initial break-in, I'd recommend changing your own oil with synthetic. Doing it yourself will help you recoup some of the additional cost of the synthetic over conventional oil.

Ok, I admit it. It wouldn't take the average shadetree mechanic 2 hours to round up everything and change his oil in his Ody. My time was eatten up by slow sales clerks and my letting the oil get all over the place.

Yep, we're talking about a steady stream of oil that shoots straight back about 8 inches when you first take the drain plug out. The drain hole it actually on the back side of the pan facing the rear of the van. It would have been nicer to have had it facing at a 45 degree angle or straight down like most normal cars.

After the oil was completely drained, I cleaned up the mess on the floor, oil pan and crossmember. Like I said, oil shoots everywhere.


My oil filter was on tight. Real tight. There's a splash guard in the way too. Yep, oil drained out from around the filter and got over everything when I took it off. I cleaned around the filter mount. I cleaned the splash guard. I cleaned the crossmember. I cleaned the floor. I cleaned me.

Working on cars is so relaxing.

I filled the filter up with fresh 10W30 and oiled down the gasket a bit. That should make it easier for me to spin the filter off and ruin my floor and clothes the next time.

I tightened up the filter and drain plug and proceeded to fill my baby (ok, my wife's baby) with fresh oil. The engine shrouding make it kind of hard to get the oil cap off and to clean around it. The hole is also at a weird angle and is low. I had to hold the funnel I was using while I poured the oil in. Time a longer funnel. I wonder if Honda sells one with a big ass "H" on it ...

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Jim
'01 GG EX
 

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Hey Jim,
I had the same problem with the tight filter. It was super-easy to get a filter wrench on it through the passenger side wheel-well (obviously after the tire is removed.) The filter sits right there with easy access and plenty of clearance to maneuver the wrench. Unfortunately, doing it this way doesn't help with the "getting oil everywhere" problem
I rotate my tires when I change my oil anyway so there is no extra work for me. If your not taking the tire off, it may be more work than necessary. Anyway, just thought this might help someone.

Chris

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99 EX Deep Velvet Blue; Fog Lights; Air Deflector; Splash Guards; Cargo Tray; Cargo Mat
 

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I have changed the oil in my Odyssey a couple of times so far, I know exactly what you experienced. Here is what I did the second time I did it:
First of all, I always change my oil when the engine is cold because that's when all the oil is in the pan and it's a lot safer working around a cold engine.

To prevent the oil from shooting out when you remove the drainplug, I always leave the oil filler cap and dipstik on, I remove them after the oil starts flowing.

I use a couple of different oil filter wrenches, I use honda style wrench when the filter is not tight and a strap type wrench when it is.

To prevent the oil from spilling everywhere, I slip a plastic shopping bag over the filter after it's loosen by the wrench.

I never have to remove the wheel to access the filter, but I always jack up the front of car because the drain plug is at the back of the pan, to completely drain the old oil out.

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Harry
'99 Odyssey Pictures
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nice tips. Thanks!

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Jim
'01 GG EX
 

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I'll definately start using the bag trick next time. Thanks

Chris

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99 EX Deep Velvet Blue; Fog Lights; Air Deflector; Splash Guards; Cargo Tray; Cargo Mat
 

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I was able to reach the filter by just turning the wheel all the way to the right. Just enough ground clearance to get at the drain plug. Little tougher trying to torque it though. Since I had the pan further in under the Ody when I loosened the plug, got lucky and didn't make a mess. Always have newpaper down anyway just incase.
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Jim F:
My time was eatten up by slow sales clerks and my letting the oil get all over the place.

Yep, we're talking about a steady stream of oil that shoots straight back about 8 inches when you first take the drain plug out. The drain hole it actually on the back side of the pan facing the rear of the van. It would have been nicer to have had it facing at a 45 degree angle or straight down like most normal cars.

There's a splash guard in the way too. Yep, oil drained out from around the filter and got over everything when I took it off. I cleaned around the filter mount. I cleaned the splash guard. I cleaned the crossmember. I cleaned the floor. I cleaned me.

I had to hold the funnel I was using while I poured the oil in.
</font>


Jim,
Here is how I do it:
Purchase a Prestone coolant funnel, yellow color. I find this to be ideal for adding oil on all my Hondas. It's wide and shallow, perfect for oil changes.

Next, turn your wheels all the way to the right to provide easier access, to address the splash shield issue, purchase the smallest bungee cord you can find, they have one that is very thin and about 6" long (unstretched) with hooks on each end. Hook one end to the hole in the splash shield (near the lower corner that is bent at 90 degrees - below the drain plug), attach the other end to a suspension component near the inside of the wheel. This pulls the splash shield out of the way and holds it there.


Always coat the gasket of the new filter with new oil and tighten by hand as much as you can and then use the filter wrench but don't tighten any further than ~1/2 turn.

BTW,
Harry, it's best to change the oil when the engine is warm. The oil flows faster and it drains more completely. I also use a filter wrench that is driven by a socket wrench not the strap type. I found this provides easier access and leverage in tight spaces. If you tighten the filter when the engine is cold, most people will overtighten it. You can usually turn the filter more when the engine is cooler, as the engine heats up the oil filter gasket will swell and stick to the engine making it difficult to remove.


[This message has been edited by hip (edited 04-30-2001).]
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by hip:
BTW,
Harry, it's best to change the oil when the engine is warm. The oil flows faster and it drains more completely. I also use a filter wrench that is driven by a socket wrench not the strap type. I found this provides easier access and leverage in tight spaces. If you tighten the filter when the engine is cold, most people will overtighten it. You can usually turn the filter more when the engine is cooler, as the engine heats up the oil filter gasket will swell and stick to the engine making it difficult to remove.
</font>
I agree that oil flows better when it's warm, I always do my oil change in the morning so the oil has flowed down to the pan. I've compared the amount of oil that comes out between cold vs. warm engine and saw more oil out when it's cold.

Which filter wrench do you use? I have 2 type of wrench that uses 3/8" socket wrench, one looks like an oversize socket and one is like a giant clamp with springs which grap the end of the filter tighter as you turn the wrench, but it is only for removing.
If your filter is very tight, using the one that looks like an oversize socket wrench, you might round the filter grip (the end part). But using the strap type, the more you turn, the tighter it grips.

I haven't had any problem with filter becoming too tight (knock on wood) as the result of changing it with cold engine.

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Harry
'99 Odyssey Pictures
 

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BTW, Here's another tip for all you DIY'rs:
When changing your own oil, fill the filter first, it takes several attempts as each time it is filled, it takes a minute or two for the oil to soak into the element.

The first few seconds an engine runs is critical, without oil reaching the upper cylinders right away your pumping dry. You know how it sounds when you first start your vehicle and the oil hasn't circulated? You can actually hear the grinding for ~2-3 seconds.

By filling your filter with fresh oil first, its virtually eliminated. This is especially true if you do as Harry suggests and work on a cold engine. The choke usually starts to race the engine immediately, this exacerbates the condition.

Anyway, this will prolong your engine as much if not more than spending money on synthetics, and it's cheaper


[This message has been edited by hip (edited 04-30-2001).]
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by hip:
BTW, Here's another tip for all you DIY'rs:
When changing your own oil, fill the filter first, it takes several attempts as each time it is filled, it takes a minute or two for the oil to soak into the element.

The first few seconds an engine runs is critical, without oil reaching the upper cylinders right away your pumping dry. You know how it sounds when you first start your vehicle and the oil hasn't circulated? You can actually hear the grinding for ~2-3 seconds.

By filling your filter with fresh oil first, its virtually eliminated. This is especially true if you do as Harry suggests and work on a cold engine. The choke usually starts to race the engine immediately, this exacerbates the condition.

Anyway, this will prolong your engine as much if not more than spending money on synthetics, and it's cheaper


</font>
Great tip, Hy! I never thought about that, thanks.

As for synthetic oil, I am not sure about its benefits either. I use to use full synthetic on all my cars, though I never had any engine problems despite the high mileage, I can't say that it's the benefit of using synthetic. All the cars I've owned, had over 100,000 miles.

I always change my oil and filter at 3,750 miles, and I use 2 quarts synthetic and the rest dino oil, more synthetic than buying the "Blend" oil.

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Harry
'99 Odyssey Pictures
 

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Just finished changing the oil at 2064 miles(3 and 1/2 months later;van is "severely"driven since my wife does'nt go farther than an average of 5 miles each way) andI'm telling you, this was the EASIEST access I've ever had to an oil filter ! Just turn the wheel to the right and spin it off ! Don't even have to do a wiggling of the hand.I wish all my cars oil filters were/are positioned like this.
Took everyone's advice about the oil splattering all over.
Got a 2 for 1 deal on Honda filters at my dealer(kool!). They send me coupons every month or so.Washers were free.
Used Mobil regular. Will probably go to my regular Mobil 1next oil change.
Also bougt this great funnel which hold the oil quart at the top and has a flexible/extendable spout.
Defintely a much easier oil change than the Civic I used to own.


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Rob/'01 GG LX
http://www.fototime.com/inv/F549E20307C08A3
 

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Jim (and you other DIY'ers out there):

Do you folks have lifts? If not, what process are you using to raise your vehicles? I am a bit hesitant about doing my own oil changes, simply because of the problem getting access; I would also like to be able to inspect various systems from the underside, and perhaps rotate my tires as well.

Just curious as to how you folks go about this.

Thanks.

RFT!!!
Dave Kelsen.
Can you repeat the part after "Listen very carefully"?
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Kelsen:
Do you folks have lifts?</font>
I use a floor jack and jack stands.

In my opinion, if you can get a dealer to change your oil for $20, do it! I've seen Honda dealers advertise that price in the past. They can do it in less than 30 minutes and they are liable for any damages.

Now, if you run synthetic and you don't mind getting a little dirty, you can save some money by doing it yourself.

My SE-R takes all of 5 minutes to change the oil and filter. I run synthetic in it. It's worth it to me to change my own oil in that. The Ody takes longer and is heavy. I'll still service it myself, but for the majority of Ody owners I think the dealer would be best.

Steer clear of the 15 minute oil change places that are around.

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Jim
'01 GG EX
 

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Changing the oil myself isn't worth the hassle to me. My dealer only charges about $16.50 for an oil change and I consider it cheap insurance to do it every 3000 miles.

If and when I have any problems, my service records at the dealer will show timely maintenance and loyalty to the dealer. I've learned that these are powerful tools when I'm asking for his (the dealer's) assistance in any out-of-warranty situations.

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Chuck
Click here for Ody pics, mods and fixes.

[This message has been edited by ckonarske (edited 06-29-2001).]
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Kelsen:
Jim (and you other DIY'ers out there):

Do you folks have lifts? If not, what process are you using to raise your vehicles?
</font>
Dave,
For the Ody, I don't even use a floor jack.I enjoy getting "down and dirty".

Seriously, I found it easily accessible with regards to the oil pan drain plug and the filter.


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Rob/'01 GG LX "Lagreat"
http://www.fototime.com/inv/46E6936F1F9A447
 

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BTW,
Harry, it's best to change the oil when the engine
is warm. The oil flows faster and it drains more
completely. I also use a filter wrench that is driven
by a socket wrench not the strap type. I found
this provides easier access and leverage in tight
spaces. If you tighten the filter when the engine is
cold, most people will overtighten it. You can
usually turn the filter more when the engine is
cooler, as the engine heats up the oil filter gasket
will swell and stick to the engine making it difficult
to remove.

I have to agree with hip. It is recommended to change engine oil when the engine is warm. A more important reason for doing this is that the oil is less stratified in the pan and the carbon, dirt, grit, etc. suspended in the oil does not have time to settle out in the pan before you drain it if the engine is still warm. Once the engine cools the junk in the oil tends to settle to the bottom of the oil pan and is less likely to be flushed out when you drain the oil. Then you put in the new oil and all of that old junk in the bottom of the pan gets mixed into the nice new clean oil....yuck! Your engine will appreciate it more if you change your oil when it is warm! :)

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'01 TW EX
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Odyinid:
BTW,
Harry, it's best to change the oil when the engine
is warm. The oil flows faster and it drains more
completely. I also use a filter wrench that is driven
by a socket wrench not the strap type. I found
this provides easier access and leverage in tight
spaces. If you tighten the filter when the engine is
cold, most people will overtighten it. You can
usually turn the filter more when the engine is
cooler, as the engine heats up the oil filter gasket
will swell and stick to the engine making it difficult
to remove.

I have to agree with hip. It is recommended to change engine oil when the engine is warm. A more important reason for doing this is that the oil is less stratified in the pan and the carbon, dirt, grit, etc. suspended in the oil does not have time to settle out in the pan before you drain it if the engine is still warm. Once the engine cools the junk in the oil tends to settle to the bottom of the oil pan and is less likely to be flushed out when you drain the oil. Then you put in the new oil and all of that old junk in the bottom of the pan gets mixed into the nice new clean oil....yuck! Your engine will appreciate it more if you change your oil when it is warm! :)

</font>
First of all, you DO NOT use wrench to tighten up oil filter, oil filter should only be hand tight.
Second, if you start your engine and let the oil recirculate, the carbon, dirt, grit as you call it will also be recirculated through out your engine.
And third, if you ever try comparing the amount of oil that comes out between cold engine and warm engine as I did, I doubt you'll have the same opinion as you do know.

Anyway, each of us have our own method that we feel comfortable with. My method comes from 20+ years of doing my own maintenance on each of the car that I've eve owned, I am sure you have your own reason.

-Harry
 

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Harry,

Being new to this forum I posted part of another message that I was responding to in my reply box. I agree with you that you never tighten an oil filter with a wrench! The point I was trying to make is that the reason for the oil change is eleminate the old oil and contaminants from your engine and replace it with clean oil. If you change the oil when it is warm or hot (say after a short trip to the store) you are much more likely to drain out some of the crud that contaminates your oil because it is more likely to be suspended in the oil. If you give the engine time to cool down the crud in the oil will settle out and may not be flushed from the engine.

BTW how in the heck do you place a portion of a post that you are responding to in you message so that it is in BOLD???

Thanks - Jim

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'01 TW EX
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Odyinid:
BTW how in the heck do you place a portion of a post that you are responding to in you message so that it is in BOLD???

Thanks - Jim

</font>
Hi Jim,

When I click the icon to reply to a post w/quote, it always buts the quoted part in bolt print. If your computer isn't doing this, you can force the issue by by putting in front of the text you want bolded and after the text you want bolded. There are other formatting tricks you can use too. You can read about them by clicking on the link (UBB Code is ON)to the left of the "Your Reply" box that you type in when you reply to someone elses post.

Good luck & Drive Safe,
Steve

[This message has been edited by Intrepid175 (edited 06-30-2001).]
 

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You can read about them by clicking on the link (UBB Code is ON)to
the left of the "Your Reply" box that you type in when you reply to
someone elses post.

Good luck & Drive Safe,
Steve


Thanks Steve!

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'01 TW EX
 
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