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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if anyone's installed "air-ride" or air bag suspension on their Gen 4?

Looking for the ability to instantly lower and raise the height (per situation) and maintain a comfortable ride.

Not doing this for looks, but for practicality and easy of access into the vehicle while parked. And also hopefully for improved aero @ speed.
 

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Looking for the ability to instantly lower and raise the height (per situation) and maintain a comfortable ride.

Not doing this for looks, but for practicality and easy of access into the vehicle while parked. And also hopefully for improved aero @ speed.
look up vankulture on FB or instagram its been done on a lot of odyssey's not just 4thgen. Something that i considered but costly so i just did springs for now but yes its been done.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
flipside22 - thanks for the info. Looks like their website only advertises the MR coil-overs as an option.
 

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flipside22 - thanks for the info. Looks like their website only advertises the MR coil-overs as an option.
Yes on the site they only have megan but BC coilovers are available and so as h&r springs as well for the ody. As far as air suspension a couple i know thats popular for the ody are airrunner and airex and i think air lift suspension. Most use coilover over bags on theyre set up.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wonder how well the air-bag suspension rides? Too bad there's a big tank/reservoir required to be installed, need to find a better place to put this or integrate into the vehicle not to use up valuable space
 

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As far as ride quality, I can say for sure but my buddy who has a bagged S3 said that when he was buying his set up, there was 2 option. Performance or regular or something in that nature.

Just think about it though, our bus transits uses these bags as well so my guess is it can be comfortable.
 

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pg62 - thanks for the link. That's where I thought I'd consider putting the tank, would need to fit a compressor into that area too. I was thinking perhaps a composite tank which followed the curvature of that panel area would likely maximize the tank capacity?
 

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Been curious on where he put the compressor...
Airlifts in the rear, or their equivalent, will not work well to level a van. The range of height adjustment is not large - maybe an inch or so, maybe a little more. They do help with heavy loads.

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I have installed the Airlifts on my '16 EX, because I have a luggage platform on a trailer hitch, then a bike rack after the luggage rack, then a full size spare mounted on the bike rack - and it's heavy. The rear end sagged when I travel with a loaded van, and it swayed when initiating a turn. I also had these Airlifts and the luggage/bike rack on a 2000 Odyssey, and moved them over to the '16 van.

I removed each rear spring to install the air bags. I did not hacksaw the snubbers as recommended by Airlift. I put a 1-1/2" thick, 3-1/2" diameter spacer in place of the factory snubber. It required making a space (a 1" hole), for the bolt head on the spacer surface that contacts the air bag. A 2" thick spacer might be better, depending on the load you plan to carry. I made the spacers from several layers of thick, 1/2" aluminum, cut in a circle, bolted together (drilled and tapped, flat head machine screws). 1/2" Lexan (not acrylic) may also work. Finding a longer 12mm bolt to mount the spacers was not so easy, so be sure you have them ahead of time. Or - use the factory snubber bolt and drill the 1" hole through all but the last spacer plate in each assembly.

The ride height was not changed much (not at all, without those spacers). What this does, is to change the spring rate when the air bags come into play, The ride feels different than the original springs alone over larger undulating bumps, because air bags have a variable spring rate and coil springs do not. I replaced the Honda shocks with adjustable shocks, to help stiffen the rear and reduce the sway induced from the load extending way past the rear axle, but you shouldn't have to do this, because the OEM shocks are already fairly stiff. I am happy with the result, as I was with my 2000 Odyssey. But I wouldn't go through this just to add a leveling system to the rear of the car, that only has about an inch of adjustment range.

(Continued - whatever happened to the ability to cut and paste these writeups?)
I put the air pump behind the rearmost driver fascia, where that vacuum cleaner accessory would otherwise have been. You might be able to put the pump under the dash somewhere, but I didn't try. I mounted the old, original pressure gauge/switch panel directly under the steering column (the new Airlift power panel is different). The air lines went under the carpet next to the doorsill. I drilled two 1/4+ inch holes through the floor alongside the front seat, to get the air lines underneath the car. There's a depression in the sheet metal for those holes, where you can drill through at a rearward facing angle. I sealed the air lines to the floor with silicone. Underneath the vehicle I used aluminum air conditioning tape to fasten the air lines to the chassis. There is a flat spot in the rearmost corner behind the rear fascia, below the tail light, and that is where the air lines re-enter the inside of the vehicle (vertically). The air lines reach the air bags through the open channel in each lower control arm from the center of the chassis. Again, secure the air lines to the lower control arm and the center chassis with that aluminum tape. Clean the surfaces before applying the tape, and that tape will stay stuck.
 
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