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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So what is the heavies camper anyone has pulls with their Honda?

We want to upgrade our camper and was wondering how big we could go.

BTW were in Colorado, thin air.
 
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My pop-up is 3072 on the sticker. Naturally, I put some gear in it when we go, so I'm probably riding close to the 3500lbs limit. The Odyssey does it with ease and braking is no issue either with the Tekonsha Prodigy brake controller. I have the full Honda tow package except for the wire harness, which won't work if need have a trailer with brakes.
 

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The official story is that the 3500 lb limit only applies when the van is empty, no passengers or cargo. As you add passengers and cargo, your tow limit decreases. For your 06, it's discussed in the manual here https://techinfo.honda.com/rjanisis/pubs/om/HJ0606/HJ0606O00312A.pdf

It will pull more than it's rated to pull, especially over level ground, but the problem eventually becomes braking and handling, especially in the steep twisties.
 

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The sad fact is car companies have been rating mini-vans at 3500lbs for probably for 15 years! I'll tell you straight-up, the Odyssey is a tank compared to the Montana's and Caravans on the road. Mine easily manages a 3000+ lb pup trailer.

Fine print: Make sure your trailer has electronic brakes, use a good electronic brake controller, and get sway control. Another thing - keep the tongue at the recommended % of weight which is usually 12-15%... I even through on airlifts for added measure.
 

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I am fairly sure Honda UNDERSTATES what the vehicle can pull for CYA purposes. I have seen 3rd Gens with fairly large fiberglass boats attached to them...not that I would recommend that.........:stupid:
 

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We just moved in July, and I had been planning to tow a trailer with the '05 Touring for quite some time. It's a 1,200 lbs empty with a GVWR of 2,995#, so we were within all the limits. The problem came when we ran out of space in the PODS for our normal household belongings and kept putting more and more stuff into the trailer. The day of the 1,000 mile trip, our poor van had over 5,200# in, on, and behind it. Needless to say, I had no choice but to see what happened and fully expected to buy a transmission... Well,

The van towed like a champ. I lost speed on hills and never dared to turn on cruise control, but went 60-65 mph on flat freeways. I would NEVER EVER DO THAT AGAIN without trailer brakes though. Trying to stop was part prayer and part luck. Stopping distance was at least doubled, probably tripled. I was paranoid the entire time, but it pulled through (no pun intended). Newport, RI to Woodruff, SC. There were big hills, but no mountains. I don't think I would have survived mountains without trailer brakes.

I can say with confidence that the van has towed over 2.5 tons over 1,000 miles, but I am not sure if I would want to do it very many times, if ever again, with that much weight.

The van goes in for trailer brakes tomorrow. With the appropriate stopping power, I will probably feel comfortable pulling 4,000# or so from Woodruff, SC to San Diego, CA along I-20. I'd rather it be more like 3,000# though. It's not a camper, but a 6'x10' enclosed V-nose trailer. I don't have weight distribution or sway control, either. It felt solid without it. Hope this helps.
 

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Swigoose, curious, is that 5200 # in the loaded trailer only, or including passenger, cargo and roof rack items ? Wonder what was the total GCVW at that point.
 

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I would have been more concerned with the axles being overloaded. When we moved from MD to IL last year, our [email protected] movers decided to leave a some of our stuff on our driveway. After giving away what we could to our neighbors, we still had to cram what we could into our Ody. I'm sure our rear axle was overloaded as I'd never seen the rear end sag so much. With that said, the 700+ mile drive was uneventful. Braking distance was just minimally affected but I also wasn't pulling a trailer.
 

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Swigoose, curious, is that 5200 # in the loaded trailer only, or including passenger, cargo and roof rack items ? Wonder what was the total GCVW at that point.
That was in the loaded trailer only. Total weight was 9,640. 2,400 on front axle, and the other 7,240 between the rear and trailer axle. I ran across that weight ticket the other day and still shook my head at how something didn't go wrong.
 

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That was in the loaded trailer only. Total weight was 9,640. 2,400 on front axle, and the other 7,240 between the rear and trailer axle. I ran across that weight ticket the other day and still shook my head at how something didn't go wrong.
Waaah??? Your rear axle was carrying more than double what they are rated for….crazy! You're the best driver ever!

P.s. - ya, don't do that again. LOL
 

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We are looking at Oddy’s. 2010 Touring specifically. Trading our 2007 Pilot because we are needing more room.

Currently pulling a #3200 pop up with the Pilot. The Pilot has a #3500 trailer limit and #4500 boat limit and it does just fine. We just seem to run out of room for our stuff J By time we load up with wood, cooler, clothes, and other misc stuff we seem to always be full. So, the Oddy seems like it will have a lot more room to swallow stuff and have more room to accommodate people traveling all other times.

I just want to make sure, and from what I think I have read in other threads I have searched, the Oddy should handle it ok. I see from what I have read too that the tow capacity is reduced by people weight and I account for two passengers. I want to make sure have everything correct that I will need.
  • Hitch, probally OEM because it is more hidden
  • Coolers-transmission and PS. Went OEM on the Pilot because it was under factory certified warranty and didn’t want to mess with any hassle. Will probally do the same if the Oddy is certified. Maybe aftermarket if not.
  • Will use my Prodigy P2 brake controller
  • Will need to get a WDH
  • Do I still need to add airbags with the WDH? I have airbags with the Pilot but can’t use a WDH with the Pilot.
Primarily most of the pulling is done here in the Midwest. Trips are anywhere from 50 miles, up to 300 miles from home. Would like to make a trip out west to the Rockies someday but would probally need to strategically plan the trip weight wise.

I am just not sure what other vehicle we would like to have other than this? We have wanted an Oddy for years. Would love a crew cab truck, but that isn’t really practical for a main family vehicle. A suburban will cost us too much.

Appreciate the feedback!
 

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I see from what I have read too that the tow capacity is reduced by people weight and I account for two passengers.
Actually, I believe tow rating is based on a 150lbs driver. Any additional passengers and weight of gear comes right off the tow rating. If you still have not purchased a vehicle, I would look at other options, as IMO, I think your rig will be overloaded. Plenty of mid size suvs with more stout towing capabilities than the Pilot that are more spacious. The Toyota 4Runner comes to mind, so does the Acadia/Traverse/Enclave. As for the Suburban, we bought our 2008 LTZ for much less than our 2009 CPO EXL. It came with a lot of miles but had it checked by independent mechanic and got a good bill of health. Still made the dealer throw in a warranty but so far no issues and we have done a ton of doing with it taking our boat to our favorite area lakes ranging from 70-250 miles away.

If you're set on an ODy though, I think you've got what you need covered. I would pass on the airbags as the proper WDH will allow your suspension plenty of travel and will help reduce rear end squat. I would also recommend getting a weigh. It's eye opening for most people.
 

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If you're set on an ODy though, I think you've got what you need covered. I would pass on the airbags as the proper WDH will allow your suspension plenty of travel and will help reduce rear end squat. I would also recommend getting a weigh. It's eye opening for most people.
No, haven’t made any purchases yet. I am a researcher. Have been looking at Oddy’s for a while though and the wife just said, the extra room would be nice. So, then I wanted to make sure we would be ok pulling the camper as I knew it was already close in weight by the camper itself, not to mention all the crap she has to bring along. A man can bring, his chair, some food, wood, and some beer. Women, want to bring half the house and half the toy room. Lol. And we aren’t small people, so the 150# isn’t us. More like double us.

So, appreciate the honest feedback. We have considered the 4 runner, but the wife really likes having the 3[SUP]rd[/SUP] row seating. Don’t use it all the time, but as the kids get older and have more people in the car, that becomes handy. So, that is out. Highland is about the same size as the Pilot. We have been giving the Traverse/Acadia a serious look because they are larger. We did drive one and liked how it drove. Just haven’t owned a domestic in at least 10 years, so that will be an adjustment again. But if I were to buy a truck or large suv, it would be that.

Thanks
 

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I have posted the towing chart from the 2010 Honda Odyssey owner's manual below.

There are 3 things that I find interesting:

1 - In the table, they factor in occupants at 150 lbs each, but they make no mention of cargo inside the vehicle. They discuss cargo in the Gross numbers below the table, but wouldn't one assume that 150 lbs of beer would mean that you have to move down a row in the "Number of Occupants" column to determine the towing capacity? A logical mind would make that adjustment...I'm just surprised that they don't mention cargo in the table, specifically referring only to "occupants".

2 - There is a 1,050 lb difference in the 7 occupant towing limit between the different models listed in the notes below the table. I assume that this is because the EX, EX-L, Touring and Canadian LX models are ~1000 lbs heavier and therefore you would be pushing the Gross weight limits at the higher occupancy levels. However, it seems to me that if we have to reduce the towing capacity at those occupancy levels due the extra weight of those models, then the towing capacity for the other models should be higher at the lower occupancy levels. If they are going to include 2 towing capacities at the 7th occupant level to account for the extra weight of those models, why not include 2 towing capacities at all occupancy levels? Shouldn't all the other models be able to tow 1000 lbs more at the lower occupancy levels? Is there some other factor that comes into play at the higher occupancy levels for those models?

3 - Why the drastic reduction in towing capacity when that 8th 150 lb occupant climbs into the van? In the EX, EX-L, Touring and Canadian LX models, that one extra passenger reduces the towing capacity by 900 lbs. The combined weight of the 8th occupant and the seat itself don't add up to 900 lbs so why the 900 lb reduction for that 1 extra occupant?

Maximum Total Trailer Weight

Number
-- of --
Occupants *1


1 ------------------ 3,500 lbs (1,580 kg)
2 ------------------ 3,350 lbs (1,520 kg)
3 ------------------ 3,200 lbs (1,450 kg)
4 ------------------ 3,050 lbs (1,380 kg)
5 ------------------ 2,900 lbs (1,310 kg)
6 ------------------ 2,750 lbs (1,250 kg)
7 ------------------ 2,600 lbs (1,180 kg) *3 1,550 lbs (700 kg) *4
8 ------------------ 650 lbs (290 kg)


*1: Including driver. Based on 150 lbs (70 kg) per occupant.
*2: See page 407 for information about fluid coolers.
*3: U.S. LX and Canadian DX models
*4: EX, EX-L, Touring and Canadian LX models

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR):
The maximum allowable weight of the vehicle, all occupants, all cargo, and the tongue load is 6,019 lbs (2,730 kg).

Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR):
The maximum allowable weight of the vehicle, all occupants, all cargo, and the tongue load must not exceed 2,910 lbs (1,320 kg) on the front axle, and 3,197 lbs (1,450 kg) on the rear axle.

Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR):
The maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded vehicle and trailer is 8,410 lbs (3,815 kg).
 

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Ok my above reply to max towing weight being 0 lbs with an Oddy transmission
is suppose to be humorous.
I don't want anyone to go off the "edge" here and start a 5 page post about
the new and improved Honda transmissions!!! :)

2001 Oddy 176000 miles with original transmission
and yes, I never towed with it
 

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Stay away from the early copies of the acadias. We had one for 6 months before we got our ody and it was a hot mess. I think it made some list of used cars to avoid. Newer ones I've heard are a vast improvement but then again, it is GM so you never know. Even with our good luck with our suburban so far, there have been no problems other than simple fixes and annoying rattles on the body. Another domestic you might consider is the new ford explorer, my wife's daily driver. Great and it has a good amount more room behind the third row than the pilot. The cabins though are pretty comparable.

Odysseys IMO should only tow very light weights and short to medium distances. I've heard people having good luck with them but coming from a dedicated tow vehicle to an Ody is like night and day difference.
 

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...snip...

Odysseys IMO should only tow very light weights and short to medium distances.

...Snip...
What is your definition of "very light" and "short to medium" as it relates to towing with an Ody?

"Very light" can mean very different things to different people and can certainly mean different things in different situations. When compared to what a tractor trailer can haul, the 3500 lbs that the Ody is rated for would be considered "very light".

"Short to medium" could mean "around the block" when compared to driving across town or it could mean hundreds of miles when compared to driving across the country.

What do you mean by "very light" and "short to medium" in this specific case?
 

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If you're looking for specific weights or distances from me, I can't oblige because I've never tried to find out what my limits to towing with our Ody are. I will say that I towed my 14' fishing boat with 3 additional passengers up to about 40 miles for some time before we got our suburban and felt pretty comfortable doing that with the Ody. Even on the boat ramps with a steep incline, was always able to pull the boat out of the water with just the Ody's FWD. Got invites to fishing trips to much farther lakes though and always offered to spilt costs to climb onto someone else's boat instead of tow that distance with the Ody. I just didn't want to risk it.

There are some that think they can tow anything as long as it "tows fine" and there are others who are the towing police. I think the take home message though is to use common sense. I always liked the rule of thumb that if you have to ask if you can tow it, then you probably shouldn't.
 
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