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So with 4/32-inch of tread on the original 235-60-18 Bridgestone Turanzas at 44k miles but with winter coming, I decided to pull the trigger on a set of new Michelins during Costco's black friday $150-off sale. I went back-and forth between the Defender T+H and the Defender LTX/MS. Had a set of the earlier-gen LTXs on a '97 Expedition we once had and they were great - quiet and smooth, and at 60k miles looked like they still had half their tread left.

Didn't want the Premier at 60k warranty, nor the Primacy Touring at 55k. Minivans are hard on tread wear, and the Defender T+H had a 80,000-mile warranty, while the Defender LTX was still stout at 70k. I want long tire life and smooth/quiet, with handling competency. Both were highly-rated on Tire Rack and most reviewers with Ody or Sienna praised both tires.

However, I ended up choosing the more car-like Defender T+H, because they still met the 103 load rating, and a big reason we bought (another) Ody is we really liked the car-like handling of the 2019, and in my research I read somewhere (could have been here on OdyClub) that someone who had put the Defender LTX on their Ody said they made it "handle like a truck." 95% of the Ody's miles are unloaded or lightly-loaded and so I didn't think the handling sacrifice was worth it for the LTX and their heavy-duty load rating of 107.

On our 2006 Ody EXL, sold at 227k, we went thru multiple sets of the OEM Michelin LS, which rarely lasted much past 40k miles, and a set of Cooper Grand Touring 5's, which were decent but not great. The 2019's OEM Turanzas have miserable ratings on Tire Rack, but I think they've done OK. I have rotated them every 5k and watched psi like a hawk.

Getting the Defender T+H installed tomorrow. Will update with initial impressions then.
 

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Great in depth post. Looking forward to the follow up. Thanks!
 
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The 2019's OEM Turanzas have miserable ratings on Tire Rack, but I think they've done OK. I have rotated them every 5k and watched psi like a hawk.

Getting the Defender T+H installed tomorrow. Will update with initial impressions then.
I’m interested to hear about your impressions on the Defender T+H, as hadn’t really heard about that tire.

I was “the handle like the truck“ guy as I put LTXs this year on my Odyssey and was shocked how the handling changed with them and felt exactly like a Tahoe I recently rented. Cant wait til those LTXs are done.

what was your take on the Turanzas driving those? I was impressed with handling on those on a Pacifica I rented for a couple weeks.
 

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I’m interested to hear about your impressions on the Defender T+H, as hadn’t really heard about that tire.

I was “the handle like the truck“ guy as I put LTXs this year on my Odyssey and was shocked how the handling changed with them and felt exactly like a Tahoe I recently rented. Cant wait til those LTXs are done.

what was your take on the Turanzas driving those? I was impressed with handling on those on a Pacifica I rented for a couple weeks.
I thought the Turanzas were very quiet and smooth, and at 44k (almost 45) miles, they still had 4/32" tread indicating they should make it to at least 50,000 miles - if it was summer, but with Winter coming I didn't want to leave them. 50k miles isn't bad - as mentioned I got mid-30s to maybe 40 on each of the three sets of Michelin Energy LX (LS?) tires on our 2006 Ody.

The Turanzas also did "good enough" in snow. We don't get a ton of snow but we live in a hilly area and I recall my wife getting around ok in 6" to 8" of a surprise snow here and ended up getting stuck behind a RAV4 who had come to a stop on an uphill part of the road. Never stop moving in snow if you can avoid it!
 

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Got the Defender T+H installed last night at Costco. I won't go into what hell a Costco tire center can be on a Sunday evening, but I'll just note that someone else with a 5-pm appointment to fix a slow leak in one tire was told he'd have to wait 2 to 3 hours. Thankfully I got there at 3:20 for my 5pm appt (long story).

Anyway, first impressions of the T+H are good, in that they don't seem much different from the OEM Turanzas in terms of handling feel, cornering, and ride quality/harshness. It still feels like an Odyssey!

Noise level on most surfaces seems comparable too, altho I would have to say that the OEM Turanzas were maybe a smidge quieter. The Michelin Primacy Tour are crazy-quiet tires and they were available in the Ody's 235-60-18 size, but I wanted more than 55,000 promised miles out of them.

So overall I am happy I got the T+H, but time will tell whether they wear ok. My 2015 Accord taught me the value of rotating the tires every 5k (which is why I didn't get the Michelin "Cross Climate" - they are directional and cannot be rotated to the other side of the car), and I am religious about tire air pressure, and we live in a rural area (mostly highway driving), so I am hopeful of max mileage out of these.
 

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I was “the handle like the truck“ guy as I put LTXs this year on my Odyssey and was shocked how the handling changed with them and felt exactly like a Tahoe I recently rented. Cant wait til those LTXs are done.
If the Defender LTX are anything like the old "LTX M/S" we had on our erstwhile 1997 Expedition, those Defender LTXs won't be done for a LOOOOONNG time. At 60k they only looked half worn if that on our Expy. Sorry.
 

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"LTX M/S" we had on our erstwhile 1997 Expedition, those Defender LTXs won't be done for a LOOOOONNG time. At 60k they only looked half worn if that on our Expy. Sorry.
Ya kinda worried about that! Which is why I originally got them. Hopefully desert heat, high speeds and towing will wear them out quicker.

Turanzas were very quiet and smooth, and at 44k (almost 45) miles, they still had 4/32" tread indicating they should make it to at least 50,000 miles
sounds like you got a lot of life out of the Turanzas! I only got around 30k out of two different sets of mxv4s that handles about as good as the Turanzas but we’re noiser.


first impressions of the T+H are good, in that they don't seem much different from the OEM Turanzas in terms of handling feel, cornering, and ride quality/harshness. It still feels like an Odyssey!
That sounds like a promising start with the T+H, as I immediately noticed the LTX felt way different on way back from the tire shop after getting them on. You’ll have to keep us posted as they wear or notice more things.

sounds like both the MichelinT+H and Bridgestone Turanzas are both good options for the odyssey!
 

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So with 4/32-inch of tread on the original 235-60-18 Bridgestone Turanzas at 44k miles but with winter coming, I decided to pull the trigger on a set of new Michelins during Costco's black friday $150-off sale. I went back-and forth between the Defender T+H and the Defender LTX/MS. Had a set of the earlier-gen LTXs on a '97 Expedition we once had and they were great - quiet and smooth, and at 60k miles looked like they still had half their tread left.

Didn't want the Premier at 60k warranty, nor the Primacy Touring at 55k. Minivans are hard on tread wear, and the Defender T+H had a 80,000-mile warranty, while the Defender LTX was still stout at 70k. I want long tire life and smooth/quiet, with handling competency. Both were highly-rated on Tire Rack and most reviewers with Ody or Sienna praised both tires.

However, I ended up choosing the more car-like Defender T+H, because they still met the 103 load rating, and a big reason we bought (another) Ody is we really liked the car-like handling of the 2019, and in my research I read somewhere (could have been here on OdyClub) that someone who had put the Defender LTX on their Ody said they made it "handle like a truck." 95% of the Ody's miles are unloaded or lightly-loaded and so I didn't think the handling sacrifice was worth it for the LTX and their heavy-duty load rating of 107.

On our 2006 Ody EXL, sold at 227k, we went thru multiple sets of the OEM Michelin LS, which rarely lasted much past 40k miles, and a set of Cooper Grand Touring 5's, which were decent but not great. The 2019's OEM Turanzas have miserable ratings on Tire Rack, but I think they've done OK. I have rotated them every 5k and watched psi like a hawk.

Getting the Defender T+H installed tomorrow. Will update with initial impressions then.
Got the Defender T+H installed last night at Costco. I won't go into what hell a Costco tire center can be on a Sunday evening, but I'll just note that someone else with a 5-pm appointment to fix a slow leak in one tire was told he'd have to wait 2 to 3 hours. Thankfully I got there at 3:20 for my 5pm appt (long story).

Anyway, first impressions of the T+H are good, in that they don't seem much different from the OEM Turanzas in terms of handling feel, cornering, and ride quality/harshness. It still feels like an Odyssey!

Noise level on most surfaces seems comparable too, altho I would have to say that the OEM Turanzas were maybe a smidge quieter. The Michelin Primacy Tour are crazy-quiet tires and they were available in the Ody's 235-60-18 size, but I wanted more than 55,000 promised miles out of them.

So overall I am happy I got the T+H, but time will tell whether they wear ok. My 2015 Accord taught me the value of rotating the tires every 5k (which is why I didn't get the Michelin "Cross Climate" - they are directional and cannot be rotated to the other side of the car), and I am religious about tire air pressure, and we live in a rural area (mostly highway driving), so I am hopeful of max mileage out of these.
Thanks a ton for sharing. I've been eyeing Costco tires for a while now and have always been curious. Our Ody is still very new so a tire replacement is far into the distant future from now, but I've been looking at possibly getting winter tires, rather some donuts + Tires at Costco that'd I'd keep on through the winter.

I'm also very religious about tire pressure and rotation. Out of curiosity, what psi do you keep your tires at? Just the stock psi all around?
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks a ton for sharing. I've been eyeing Costco tires for a while now and have always been curious. Our Ody is still very new so a tire replacement is far into the distant future from now, but I've been looking at possibly getting winter tires, rather some donuts + Tires at Costco that'd I'd keep on through the winter.

I'm also very religious about tire pressure and rotation. Out of curiosity, what psi do you keep your tires at? Just the stock psi all around?
I have a friend that lives in the next city over who has had nothing but good experiences with his Costco and no problems getting appointments to bring it in while he is still young. So your mileage may vary on that topic.

As far as tire air pressure, due to our mostly interstate/highway driving I generally run a little more psi than specified on the door jamb sticker but over the years I've learned not to get too carried away. So for the 2019 Ody I aim for 36 or so, F&R, which apparently worked well on the OEM tires.

As for my 2015 Accord Sport, it has a staggered OE spec - something like 33 front, 32 rear (or 32/31, i can't recall right now). Over time I've found 37 psi front and 35 psi rear generally has resulted in the best handling with still a decent ride and generally even tire wear. This time of year (fall) you have to check psi more often as temps are dropping; in the spring the checking frequency can be decreased since temps trend upward. The 2007 Mazda3 has a 32/32 spec for its 205-50-17 tires and lively suspension; I shoot for 36 F&R on that. OTOH, the 2001 Camry, with its Buick-like suspension and 205-65-15 tires, gets just a 1 psi nudge over stock, to 33. Because: Camry.

The last two are my kids' cars so I keep on top of them as much as my own tires. A big key to this has been the purchase of a tool I bought on Amazon called "Air Hawk". I bought it for $32 back before the price shot up. It's like a 12V or 18V cordless drill but puts air in your tires. No wires, but will run off 12V if need be. Otherwise the 120V charger charges up the battery that allows me to top off all 4 cars on one charge no problem. The onboard digital gauge is accurate and it shuts off automatically at whatever psi you set. There are other brands, but the AirHawk is what I have and after two years I still love it. I have a separate air compressor but only use it for tools now, because the AirHawk is so convenient.

In short, don't be afraid to experiment a little, keeping an eye on the max psi stamped on your tires' sidewalls.
 

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I have a friend that lives in the next city over who has had nothing but good experiences with his Costco and no problems getting appointments to bring it in while he is still young. So your mileage may vary on that topic.

As far as tire air pressure, due to our mostly interstate/highway driving I generally run a little more psi than specified on the door jamb sticker but over the years I've learned not to get too carried away. So for the 2019 Ody I aim for 36 or so, F&R, which apparently worked well on the OEM tires.

As for my 2015 Accord Sport, it has a staggered OE spec - something like 33 front, 32 rear (or 32/31, i can't recall right now). Over time I've found 37 psi front and 35 psi rear generally has resulted in the best handling with still a decent ride and generally even tire wear. This time of year (fall) you have to check psi more often as temps are dropping; in the spring the checking frequency can be decreased since temps trend upward. The 2007 Mazda3 has a 32/32 spec for its 205-50-17 tires and lively suspension; I shoot for 36 F&R on that. OTOH, the 2001 Camry, with its Buick-like suspension and 205-65-15 tires, gets just a 1 psi nudge over stock, to 33. Because: Camry.

The last two are my kids' cars so I keep on top of them as much as my own tires. A big key to this has been the purchase of a tool I bought on Amazon called "Air Hawk". I bought it for $32 back before the price shot up. It's like a 12V or 18V cordless drill but puts air in your tires. No wires, but will run off 12V if need be. Otherwise the 120V charger charges up the battery that allows me to top off all 4 cars on one charge no problem. The onboard digital gauge is accurate and it shuts off automatically at whatever psi you set. There are other brands, but the AirHawk is what I have and after two years I still love it. I have a separate air compressor but only use it for tools now, because the AirHawk is so convenient.

In short, don't be afraid to experiment a little, keeping an eye on the max psi stamped on your tires' sidewalls.
I've always carried a portable air compressor with me and have cycled through quite a few over the years, some good and some just dollar store quality. For the Ody I use this (w/ a digital read out), and it has been pretty darn accurate as I always double check with my digital tire pressure gauge just to make sure after airing up the tires. I made sure the digital gauges on both were accurate as I've tested it with my more expensive digital gauge on the air compressor. The read out from the van is a hit or a miss that's usually off by +/- 1.

The sticker on the door frame for the Elite states 36 psi all around. I've been keeping it at 37 psi for around town and it has been pretty good. After a recent mini road trip I filled up all four to 38 psi since I had a heavy load with cargo and the van averaged 28-29 MPG, which was pretty impressive.

During the summer I always measure the psi cold while the van is still in the garage and usually keep it right at the recommended 36 psi as the heat drives up that psi well into the low to mid 40's. For the colder months of the year like now, I put anywhere from 1-3 psi over depending on the scenario. My go to psi for road trips has been 38psi and that seems to be the sweet spot as I've managed my best MPG at that psi.

Without a load/cargo on a fairly flat surface on a road trip cruising at 60-70 MPH, ECO OFF, it's not uncommon to hit 30 MPG+. I don't have a heavy foot since the little one is usually with us, but even when I'm by myself although I may have a heavier foot getting onto the hwy ramp etc... the avg. hwy MPG is always 29-30 MPG. The secret to good MPG is making sure that you're alignment is on point, which I've just recently had done.

With all that said, adding a few more psi is a heavily misunderstood topic and practice, where if done right within reason it can benefit without sacrificing the tire or safety. The hybrid crowd of folks are crazy about over inflating. :LOL: Makes our few psi's look like nothing, although it'd be crazy to overdue it on a van for obvious reasons. That optimal stopping power is key and with less rubber on the road from over inflating, that's a big no no on a heavy vehicle.

It's nice to see folks like you who are keen and aware about this stuff. I can't tell you how many times I've check tires on rental cars when on business where I've seen them all over the place. You can bet that the very first thing I do is to hit that air pump at the gas station. Otherwise it'd drive me crazy. Literally.

BTW what's the psi on the door frame sticker for your Ody? 35-36?
 
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BTW what's the psi on the door frame sticker for your Ody? 35-36?
I went out to the garage to look at the door jamb sticker and it says 35 psi front and rear. for the EXL So I shoot for 36-37 when cold.

Your road trip scenario of 38 psi is one I intend to try - if we go on another road trip in 2021. We barely got one in back in June 2020. What a weird year.

You portable air compressor looks very nice for the price. I also have double-checked my Airhawk with a pro-grade round dial tire gauge I have, but in every case the Airhawk was dead-nuts on so lately I just trust the Airhawk with only occasional spot checks.
 
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I've always carried a portable air compressor with me and have cycled through quite a few over the years, some good and some just dollar store quality. For the Ody I use this (w/ a digital read out), and it has been pretty darn accurate as I always double check with my digital tire pressure gauge just to make sure after airing up the tires. I made sure the digital gauges on both were accurate as I've tested it with my more expensive digital gauge on the air compressor. The read out from the van is a hit or a miss that's usually off by +/- 1.

The sticker on the door frame for the Elite states 36 psi all around. I've been keeping it at 37 psi for around town and it has been pretty good. After a recent mini road trip I filled up all four to 38 psi since I had a heavy load with cargo and the van averaged 28-29 MPG, which was pretty impressive.

During the summer I always measure the psi cold while the van is still in the garage and usually keep it right at the recommended 36 psi as the heat drives up that psi well into the low to mid 40's. For the colder months of the year like now, I put anywhere from 1-3 psi over depending on the scenario. My go to psi for road trips has been 38psi and that seems to be the sweet spot as I've managed my best MPG at that psi.

Without a load/cargo on a fairly flat surface on a road trip cruising at 60-70 MPH, ECO OFF, it's not uncommon to hit 30 MPG+. I don't have a heavy foot since the little one is usually with us, but even when I'm by myself although I may have a heavier foot getting onto the hwy ramp etc... the avg. hwy MPG is always 29-30 MPG. The secret to good MPG is making sure that you're alignment is on point, which I've just recently had done.

With all that said, adding a few more psi is a heavily misunderstood topic and practice, where if done right within reason it can benefit without sacrificing the tire or safety. The hybrid crowd of folks are crazy about over inflating. :LOL: Makes our few psi's look like nothing, although it'd be crazy to overdue it on a van for obvious reasons. That optimal stopping power is key and with less rubber on the road from over inflating, that's a big no no on a heavy vehicle.

It's nice to see folks like you who are keen and aware about this stuff. I can't tell you how many times I've check tires on rental cars when on business where I've seen them all over the place. You can bet that the very first thing I do is to hit that air pump at the gas station. Otherwise it'd drive me crazy. Literally.

BTW what's the psi on the door frame sticker for your Ody? 35-36?
I remember back in the 1990 there was a huge war going on between Firestone/Ford Bronco/Labor at Decatur plant and Management, all dealing with Broncos having tires that separated treads and causing many accidents. NHTSA stepped in due to the accidents and everyone was pointing their fingers at one another. Air pressure was the main fight, with low pressure/over pressure and defects of the tire. NHTSA never came out with a exact cause, over 1500 employees at the Firestone Decatur plants were fired (with management) and Ford saying that they would never use a Firestone tire again. However NHTSA said all was at fault. Would you like to be a lawyer at that time and place with a client that died due to the tire on the Ford Bronco... Imagined all the tire manufactures and Auto Makers came up with having the same pressures to one another to cover their behinds on this occasion.
 
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