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Discussion Starter #1
I'm just about to clean the shift solenoid and the linear solenoid, change the OEM filter. If UPS gets here before I am done I will also install an LPD trans cooler.

Should I disconnect the trans cooler/ radiator and flush it (not the trans itself) with LubeGuard "Kooler Kleen" Trans line flush?


AND YES, I DID SEARCH THIS ONE BEFORE I POSTED.
 

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I posted my results from my Accord OEM radiator in-tank ATF cooler (same cooler as our Odys) using a HECAT flusher hooked up to my big (relatively speaking) shop compressor. I think next-to-last page of the "Meet your AT Filter" thread

The in-tank cooler is not very big, so a can of Kooler Kleen will be sufficient to remove the fine debris (looks like black sediment from a riverbed) residing in the cooler below the line level of the inlet/outlet hose barbs sticking out of the radiator's bottom tank.

You can then pour some ATF down the inlet via a funnel and tube, and get ride of the Kooler Klean that way (they're miscible with each other).

I used my HECAT heat exchanger flushing setup, and that level of sophistication was simply not necessary for that little OEM in-tank cooler. Overkill.

OF
 

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The OEM cooler is actually junk when it comes to cooling. But cleaning it out will prevent anything from going elsewhere in the system.
 

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Yup, the in-tank cooler is not worth much for heat exchange....

I just changed an OE Honda radiator in my 1998 Accord. Below is the new Koyo radiator, with the hose barbs for the ATF lines coming from and returning to the A/T.



Now, the bottom tank removed from the old radiator. The side facing us is the side that faces the motor. You can see the connection that returns coolant back to the engine on the right side.



A different shot to show the orientation of the ATF in-tank cooler.



Now, below, is the cooler removed from the tank, next to a 7/8"-15/16" combo wrench.



The cooler upended to show it is nothing more than a pair of concentric tubes sealed at both ends to form a jacket that the ATF can run through, with the center of the smaller tube left open on both ends. The coolant runs around the bigger concentric tube, and through the center of the smaller concentric tube. I cannot comment on its efficiency as a liquid-to-liquid heat exchanger, but it does have a good amount of surface area along with larger cross-sectional area to slow the speed of the ATF (but not the overal volume/second) so that the ATF moving through it can hang around a little longer in the cooler.



One thing I can say, efficiency aside...from gathering data via my 4-channel thermocouple thermometer, these radiator in-tank ATF coolers leave a lot to be desired. As noted by gregersonke, if your goal is to pull a lot of heat from your ATF, you need something a little more effective added to the mix to move more BTU's.

Now, below is a shot of the coolers through the years...the OEM items that Honda tells you to add if you install a hitch. 2007 got a pretty nice ATF cooler, while 1999-2006 (the years that could've used a better ATF cooler) ended up with a finned drinking straw. At least Honda finned both legs of the U-tube for 2005-2006.



OF
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Kooler Kleener

I ran the Kooler Cleaner through the radiator trans cooler as the instructions stated. I then put the magnetic inline filter after that cooler and before the LPD cooler. It made sense to me. Took a 100 mile trip. ran perfect. hope it lasts a while.
 

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chris, I sure hope it lasts a while...a long while.

BTW, thanks for re-formatting the sig line with that impressive list of cars. I was beginning to think it was my arthritis that was keeping me from scrolling down the pages as quickly as I used to.;)

Totally off topic, but now I just noticed your Alfa GTV...was it the 1.8L or 2.0L Alfa twin cam? I really like Italian cars from the 70's.

Hope the pics verified for you that a single can of Kooler Kleaner can easily take care of that OEM radiator in-tank ATF cooler. gregersonke is correct...it doesn't have a lot of "holdup volume", and doesn't do a lot for us.

Glad to hear the good news, :nice: and I'm not just keeping my fingers crossed, but praying for good results. Always seems to work for me, no matter what the outcome.

OF
 

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Discussion Starter #7
sig line

No prob. I changed the sig line based on friendly advice from another member. I will make the font smaller when I get a chance.
The GTV had a two liter twin cam and this funky mechanical fuel injection. I was told by an alfa tech told me was a converted diesel injector. That was a wild ride.
 

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Re: sig line

chrisarnt said:
....The GTV had a two liter twin cam and this funky mechanical fuel injection. I was told by an alfa tech told me was a converted diesel injector. That was a wild ride.
SPICA mechanical injection! Holy smokes, I forgot that these guys didn't use Webers. SPICA made stuff for gas and diesel, and I could never tell them apart....man, talk about a trip down memory lane.

I've got a hankering to buy another X1/9....

OF
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'd like to pick up a little convertible.

I'd like to pick up a Fiat convertible.

What do you think most reliable
Alfa
Fiat
Triumph
????
 

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Man, I'd say all of those, from that time period, has its own respective set of Achilles tendons. I'm definitely more comfortable with the Italian machines, and I think parts are a little bit less expensive. Old Triumphs are a little bit more exclusive, though...you won't hardly ever see somebody with another one these days.

OF
 
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