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Has anyone ever use one of these filtermags?



http://www.filtermag.com/

I have always liked the vehicles that have magnets in the oil drain plug to catch the small metal particles. The honda does not but this filter magnet seems like a good idea instead.

BrianB
 

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BrianB said:
Has anyone ever use one of these filtermags?



http://www.filtermag.com/

I have always liked the vehicles that have magnets in the oil drain plug to catch the small metal particles. The honda does not but this filter magnet seems like a good idea instead.

BrianB
Could not hurt.....
 

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egads said:
Of course the engine is made out of aluminum.
Doesn't it have iron cylinder liners, an iron crankshaft, iron piston rings, oil pump gears, and iron camshafts, rocker arms and valves? All of that stuff is subject to some wear and a magnet surely could not hurt anything.

Jerry O.
 

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They exagerate the effectiveness

I am also a fan of using magnets to catch wear particles
and as was mentioned they can't do any harm..

My only complaint is how they advertise the effectiveness of their
product.

They show a filter cut open after using them with the material
trapped by the magnets stuck to the inside of the oil filter
casing...

But this part of the filter is where the oil enters. So it is quite possible that most/all of the material that the magnet has trappped at this point would be caught by the oil filter anyway.
 

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I used a very strong magnet once on the bottom of the oil pan of my Ford Bronco for the longest time, when I needed the head gasket replaced, my mechanic had commented how "clean" the inside of the engine looked even with 195k miles. I guess it helps-but every time I had to change the oil I would find nails, screws, a fork or spoon attached to my oil pan.

It also slowed me down going over bridges for some reason. :um: :dunno:
 

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happywith3 said:
I guess it helps-but every time I had to change the oil I would find nails, screws, a fork or spoon attached to my oil pan.
:D :D

happywith3 said:
It also slowed me down going over bridges for some reason. :um: :dunno:
Wow, that must have been one hell of a magnet!!!! :heh:
 

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I have switched to the FilterMag (RA300) after using the ForceField filter. The ForceField had a tendency to get slightly loose when I checked it at filter-change-time. I guess I could have safety wired it, but did not want to go to the trouble.

The ForceField definitely works. There was no metal grossly visible on the magnet. My autopsy showed a moderate amount of metal dust (claimed down to 5 microns) on the magnet and attendant metal plates -- visible only when wiped off. When I wiped the magnet and plates with Kleenex and paper towels the metal dust came off and looked like smudges of black pencil lead on the paper.

Based on these observations I wish that I had had the FilterMag from the day I drove off the lot.

I will post autopsy pics when I remove the other forcefield from Mom's Civic.

Notice in this video how the Forcefield (supposedly tight) turns a bit more when the tech tightens the oil filter on top of it.

Here is the FilterMag promo:
 

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On the 2006+ the oil filter is already pretty low to the ground so I would hesitate to squeeze in an adapter. I think the concept is sound and although some of what these magnets trap would be trapped by the filter lots of smaller ferrous particles will be trapped that would otherwise circulate in the oil. The wrap around type seem to make the most sense to me. Trapped iron goes out with the old filter with no extra work.

The most damaging particles for an engine are those small enough to pass though the filter (less than 25 microns) and larger than the oil film between moving parts (~ 3 microns IIRC).

I have added a rare earth magnet to the end of my drain plug on all my cars and there is usually a small amount of build up at each change.
 

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These things work. I started out with one RA300, which fits about half the circumference of the filter, but it is too tall for the Honda filter (it is the same height as the filter) and you have struggle to unseat it in order to fit the filter wrench onto the flats on the end of the filter.

I subsequently went to two SS300 Filtermags which are the same radius as the above, but are shorter and do not cover the flats on the end of the filter and allow room for the fitting of the filter wrench.

The two SS300's cover almost 360 degrees of the filter and there is "black dust" on the inside walls of all my filters when I cut them open.

I wish that I had been using these puppies from mile zero. They just take a minute to "slap on" and are well worth the investment.
 

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Magnetic filtering of very small ferrous particles is not a bad idea, IMHO.

I mean, even if most of it is less than 2-3 microns (i.e., really, really small and will live within the film of oil covering bearings without causing bearing surface wear damage), iron particles hurt oil badly in other ways.

The big deal is that most oil analysis companies (like Blackstone, for instance) test for a TBN (total base number) when they do a UOA for a customer. If the TBN is too low, they'll recommend a shorter OCI (oil change interval).

Iron acts as a co-catalyst (for lack of better words) for oxidation, which acts with other chemical reactions occuring in your motor oil to lower the oil's TBN. If you use a magnet to clump it in one place (like against the casing wall of your oil filter), you've greatly reduced the available surface area of those ferrous particles, which means they can't do as much damage to the oil from a solutions chemistry standpoint.

In short, this should allow your oil to be chemically "healthier" (again, for lack of better words) for a longer period of time. That's good for your engine.

sinbad, thanks for the post on your experience with FilterMag products.

OF
 

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I have always liked the vehicles that have magnets in the oil drain plug to catch the small metal particles. The honda does not but this filter magnet seems like a good idea instead.
You can buy an aftermarket oil drain plug with a magnet in it.
 

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DSCN1921.jpg
Here is the inside of my cut oil filter after 4,000 miles with two of the #SS300 FilterMags magnets attached to the outside of the oil filter, 180 degrees apart. Only one side is seen. The other side looks identical. I had to remove the magnets in order to attach my filter cutter to the oil filter, so I probably lost some of the metal dust in the process. I had previously run about 6,000 mile with a ForceField filter (see below) in place, so metal particles are still being generated. Bottom line, this thing works.

dscn0647web.jpg
Here is the ForceField filter in place above the oil filter, with cooling fin gizmo attached around the oil filter. I beveled the top of the cooling fins for clearance, but eventually removed them after judging them to be too close to the CV joint boot and shaft. Permanent install would have to be safety wired for piece of mind. I later chucked the ForceField after it kept getting loose and after it scoured a grove in the mating surface on the engine bracket.
 

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Save your money. It won't catch non-ferrous particles and it certainly won't improve gas mileage.

The engine in the Ody will usually outlast just about everything else in the van with regular oil and filter changes.
 

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I found this magnet for oil filters. Oil Filter Magnet by GWR saves fuel, increases enging life, reduces wear, reduces oil change intervals. Patented magnet fit inside oil filter and saves fuel.

In "theory" it looks to do a better job than the filter mag, or Forcefield. I have not tried any of these, I'm trying to find which would be the best. Your opinions and comments would be helpful. Let me know what you think ???
I do not recommend the ForceField, that screws on between the filter and the engine -- it does not make a good seal and will work loose; it you tighten it then it can scour the face of the oil filter bracket.

The GRW magnet inside the filter could come loose and obstruct flow -- so I do not like that possibility.

My "slap-on" FilterMags continue to work great -- I have two of them on the circumference of the oil filter. I continue to find metallic "dust" (as depicted in my above post) adhering to the inside of the filter after every oil change.
 

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I also changed my drain plug to a magnet one just like on ATF pan plug ($6) with no other mods. That was only because I once had a bad bolt and needed one in the evening. Ended up with that. Only one time I noticed some black deposit on it and most of the time its clean. Magnets do not hurt but wonder if its better in the pan or filter.

This filter magnet that wraps around or inserted into oil filter is kind of like the magnet that was available long time back that supposed to be zip-tied to fuel line. The idea was the same. As fuel passed through it would realign the molecules, blah blah. Here supposedly it will catch the particles.

Might be good to have flat magnets at pan and around oil filter ($5 for 4 at micheals + large hose clamp like in one pic above). I would not buy those $20+ things. It definitely won't help too much. There are a few in this forum that have passed 350k miles and that was all unmodified filtration miles right?
 

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i use filtermag on ALL of my cars. I also have one that goes between the filter and the block, but forgot what it's called. Never installed that one.
For the filtermag, I was sold when i saw it about 8-10 years ago at SEMA. It catches worn or loose metallic debris(obviously magnetic) in your engine, so I'm not sure what's there to debate about. I mean, you're not catching 100% debris in the engine, there are obviously nonmagnetic material. OEM uses magnets on drain plugs.
There are universal neodymium magnetic drain plugs you can buy. These are usually the first things i buy after i purchase a new/old car/van.
 
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