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Discussion Starter #1
Good morning
My wife has had a draw that takes her batter down to nothing overnight. As I am checking things off that need done, one was the middle rollers for both sliding doors. I replaced them both over the weekend. Wow what a difference. I never put a meter to see what the draw was before doing the replacement rollers. We have been disconnecting the negative terminal over night then reconnecting in the morning. This morning I put a meter on the negative side and it settled at 22 milliamps. I still have to replace both from door lock actuators as well but I'm curious if some how worn rollers can be a cause of a parasitic draw?
Thanks as always for your help.
 

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The worn rollers should not directly but they may be causing the actuator to pull or not seat correctly. I know I had something related to the draw, I'll link it if I find it

Sent from my ONEPLUS A5000 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the responses. The doors both looked like they closed fine (when they were closed) 22 milliamps sure does seem low for a draw to drain the battery overnight
 

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Worn rollers absolutely do NOT cause a battery draw. The battery draw is caused by one of the switches in the rear latch assembly in one or both of the sliding doors. I agree with the above where a worn roller might not allow a door to latch completely, but I've never seen that in all the worn rollers I've replaced. The latches that don't latch completely are usually a problem in the latch and can cause a battery draw. The other common source of battery draw is the AC compressor relay.
 

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22mA is a great number for dark or off current - most cars I measure are in the 50mA range. There is no way that low of a current would cause your problem. I'd suspect one of the rear door switches that are built into the latch assemblies - there are plenty of threads here on this problem, which also affected my 2001 (and it took the battery to dead in two days, not one) and I was never able to catch it in action. I finally gave up and installed an on-board maintainer and we just plugged the van in overnight.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So the latch draw can be intermittent ? I replaced the AC relay a few months ago. Such great feedback here. I appreciate all of your insights.
 

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Just saw this thread and I may be able to help. About 2 years ago, our 2010 with 70,000 miles began draining the battery unexpectantly. As the battery was 3 years old, i opted to replace it but that did not solve the problem, battery would be completely dead within a day or so of no driving. It took me a while and much research but it ended up being the air conditioning relay located in the under hood fuse box. Got it at Advance Auto parts p/n R6242. If you search around, this is a well known failure. I keep a couple spares in the glove box for safe measure but so far after 25,000 miles not a single problem. Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just saw this thread and I may be able to help. About 2 years ago, our 2010 with 70,000 miles began draining the battery unexpectantly. As the battery was 3 years old, i opted to replace it but that did not solve the problem, battery would be completely dead within a day or so of no driving. It took me a while and much research but it ended up being the air conditioning relay located in the under hood fuse box. Got it at Advance Auto parts p/n R6242. If you search around, this is a well known failure. I keep a couple spares in the glove box for safe measure but so far after 25,000 miles not a single problem. Good luck
We may have posted at the same time so you might have not seen it but I did replace that relay.
 

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I've also had the same relay go bad a couple of years ago and cause battery drain (like, completely dead overnight kind of drain). Replaced relay and all is well...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've also had the same relay go bad a couple of years ago and cause battery drain (like, completely dead overnight kind of drain). Replaced relay and all is well...
Yup, common issue but I have already replaced the relay. Looks like it may have been related to the rollers. I have left the battery connected overnight for three nights now and no issues the next morning.
One new issue is the Passenger side sliding door is closed but dash indicator says its still open.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Was the passenger side roller plate rebolted to the original position on the sliding door?
Pretty darn close and I just got a note from my wife that it was happening before the rollers were replaced. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Update: No drain for a few weeks since I changed the rollers then yesterday my wife calls and says, battery dead. She mentioned the door open light had been on the dash for the passenger side sliding door(When closed). When she got home I checked for the draw and sure enough it was pretty high. I did not have time to pull the fuse for that door but I'm guessing it is part of the problem. the push in button (switch) seems fine mechanically. Thoughts?
 

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Worn rollers absolutely do NOT cause a battery draw. The battery draw is caused by one of the switches in the rear latch assembly in one or both of the sliding doors. I agree with the above where a worn roller might not allow a door to latch completely, but I've never seen that in all the worn rollers I've replaced. The latches that don't latch completely are usually a problem in the latch and can cause a battery draw. The other common source of battery draw is the AC compressor relay.
I unplugged the A/C relay and test the current that it is still there, does this test rule out AC relay problem?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Worn rollers absolutely do NOT cause a battery draw. The battery draw is caused by one of the switches in the rear latch assembly in one or both of the sliding doors. I agree with the above where a worn roller might not allow a door to latch completely, but I've never seen that in all the worn rollers I've replaced. The latches that don't latch completely are usually a problem in the latch and can cause a battery draw. The other common source of battery draw is the AC compressor relay.
John sorry to dig up my old thread but I wanted to be clear on what the problem is, is it the actuator for the door that prevents it from closing completely causing the draw?
 

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I'm sure John will reply, but as he indicated before the issue is with the micro-switches in the door latch module. It typically results in a 0.4 amp parasitic drain on the battery. The door may still close completely. This seems to be a very common issue most easily solved by replacing the latch module.
 

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I'm sure John will reply, but as he indicated before the issue is with the micro-switches in the door latch module. It typically results in a 0.4 amp parasitic drain on the battery. The door may still close completely. This seems to be a very common issue most easily solved by replacing the latch module.
^This.
 
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