Honda Odyssey Forum banner

41 - 57 of 57 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
WD40 is not a lubricant, it's a solvent and can be used to remove rust. To lube sticky parts...use a lubricant like dry PTFE or silicone. If you're trying to unstick something, yeah maybe WD40. Lube it with something else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
I agree there may be better lubricant products to use. WD-40 is a water displacement product. That’s what WD stands for. It is was developed to coat metal to prevent rust. Over the decades it has found multiple uses beyond what it was first invented for. I think it does have some lubrication benefits and I sometimes use it as a lubricant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
Your problems sound very familiar. I have owned 4 Honda Odysseys: a '99, (2) 04s, and at present, an '08. Each Ody has had power-sliding-door problems. It has been my experience that ALL of the door problems have had a root cause: the plastic rollers that hold the weight of the door until it locks up. They are the least expensive element in the system that you can also replace yourself, if you are handy. When these rollers are worn, they not only case drag on the sliding door, but they also cause misalignment of the locks, latches, and door contacts. Unless the rollers have recently been replaced, I would start there. I have replaced motors, cables, and contacts, all caused by worn-out plastic rollers.
You may be correct. My old 2001 LX, manual sliding doors. Already replaced, the sliding door "rollers". Because, they are "Manual", I notice very quickly, when they are starting to "drag", or make a slight grinding noise. (so lubricate asap).

I can, imagine, with Power Doors, Owners will not even realize the sliding doors are starting to bind/drag. Increased
resistance. Which puts added strain, on power door motors, cables, rollers, etc.... Resulting in door issues. :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
Not hijacking the thread, just setting the record straight...

WD40 is not a lubricant ...
You might want to run that by the manufacturer and see if they agree...

From WD-40 Myths & Fun Facts | Facts About WD-40 Degreaser Products | WD-40

A QUESTION OF LUBRICATION
Myth: WD-40® Multi-Use Product is not really a lubricant.

Fact: While the “W-D” in WD-40® stands for Water Displacement, WD-40® Multi-Use Product is a unique, special blend of lubricants. The product’s formulation also contains anti-corrosion agents and ingredients for penetration, water displacement and soil removal.

In addition, there are now 2 more WD-40 products that actually use lubricant/lube in the name and description.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
When my doors didn't want to latch after pulling in, I did the spray lube trick a few times and it seemed to work, but I would still have the problem reappear every couple of months. When I took my latch assembly out, I noticed that the blue microswitch in the upper right hand corner of your picture was not being actuated when the pivot mechanism that you are pointing out, was in its final position. The switch was just barely not being made, and if I flexed the pivot manually, the swich would contact. My solution was to bend the microswitch actuator arm slightly so that it was actuated at the completion of the pivot cycle. That fix worked for over a year before I sold the van.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
I think that’s a great idea to bend the arm a smidge if it’s not actuating completely to add a bit of tension to the switch mechanism. I would do that if I had to pull the assembly out again to make sure it worked every time. Perhaps verifying with an ohmmeter would be a good idea before reinstalling the assembly since it’s such a pain in the neck to do IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I think that’s a great idea to bend the arm a smidge if it’s not actuating completely to add a bit of tension to the switch mechanism. I would do that if I had to pull the assembly out again to make sure it worked every time. Perhaps verifying with an ohmmeter would be a good idea before reinstalling the assembly since it’s such a pain in the neck to do IMHO.
I could hear the switch click as it actuated, so no need to try to trace the wiring harness out to use an ohmmeter. Maybe if you wanted to verify that the switch itself wasn't bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Agreed! Just to verify that the switch is operational before going to all the work of installing just to find out the switch was bad after all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
Greetings fellow Ody Owners,
I had the same thing happen on our‘06 EXL-RES did the same thing. The video above was terrific! That being said, I am 99% sure you can lube that pivot without taking one screw out. When I did what the video showed to do I discovered that a guy may be able to take a WD-40 straw and reach that pivot from the outside of the door (see pictures below). I have posted this a couple times hoping someone will say they succeeded in lubing that pivot and not having to disassemble the entire thing just to squirt a bit of lube on it. I know it would be a HUGE help to many out there if it did actually resolve the problem. Basically, the process that needs to be done is as follows:
1. Clean the outside of the latch well enough to to see the cam mechanism and the plastic surrounding it.
2. Roll the latch from the outside just a little toward the lock position, but not enough to put it in the first detent. If you go that far you can't access the hole. You will have to pull the door handle to release the cam and start over.
3. Insert straw as shown in picture.
4. Lube!
5. BTW, I can't see where getting a little overspray on any parts in there would hurt anything either if it didn't all get on the pivot that sticks.

I will be interested in any feedback you all may have. I hope that it saves someone a bunch of time, money and headaches.

(Images Snipped)
It finally warmed up enough (40°F) for me to dare opening the slider and trying your "spray in the hole" trick.

My cold temperature problem on the driver's side has been getting worse. The last time I opened the driver's side slider it was 23°F and it wouldn't close. Kept doing the "rear pop" thing. I ended up tying a thin piece of rope to the rear roller bracket, bringing it down around the front of the base of the captain's chair and back to the rear floor bar for the PlusOne seat. That kept enough "forward tension" on the door to keep it almost closed so I could drive to work - not enough to turn off the dash light or alarm, but closed enough. Without the rope it would slide wide open when I accelerated.

When I got to work, I set the heat to HI and before I left that day, I ran the remote start for 20 minutes. It was pretty toasty when I got in the van. As I made the right turn out of the parking lot, the rope stretched a bit and the door slid back/open a few inches. I applied the brake to allow it to slide forward and it settled in nice and easy, latched and stayed shut. No more dash light, no more alarm. :)

I left it tied up and didn't use it until today when I opened it to try your spray idea. It's going to get cold again, so I should know soon enough. Leaving the rope tied to the door bracket doesn't impede the use of the door so I left it in place, ready to be quickly secured to the floor bar if the door pops open again.

I'll let you know how things go, but it's weather related - and intermittent - so it might be awhile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
It finally warmed up enough (40°F) for me to dare opening the slider and trying your "spray in the hole" trick.

My cold temperature problem on the driver's side has been getting worse. The last time I opened the driver's side slider it was 23°F and it wouldn't close. Kept doing the "rear pop" thing. I ended up tying a thin piece of rope to the rear roller bracket, bringing it down around the front of the base of the captain's chair and back to the rear floor bar for the PlusOne seat. That kept enough "forward tension" on the door to keep it almost closed so I could drive to work - not enough to turn off the dash light or alarm, but closed enough. Without the rope it would slide wide open when I accelerated.

When I got to work, I set the heat to HI and before I left that day, I ran the remote start for 20 minutes. It was pretty toasty when I got in the van. As I made the right turn out of the parking lot, the rope stretched a bit and the door slid back/open a few inches. I applied the brake to allow it to slide forward and it settled in nice and easy, latched and stayed shut. No more dash light, no more alarm. :)

I left it tied up and didn't use it until today when I opened it to try your spray idea. It's going to get cold again, so I should know soon enough. Leaving the rope tied to the door bracket doesn't impede the use of the door so I left it in place, ready to be quickly secured to the floor bar if the door pops open again.

I'll let you know how things go, but it's weather related - and intermittent - so it might be awhile.
Just keeping the thread alive with an update. The temperature has dropped into the low 20's F and the door has not given me any issues. Maybe it's just my imagination, but it seems to sound smoother when it latches. We've got some varying weather coming up over the next few days, including some sleet and freezing rain, so we'll see how the door reacts to that.

If the door continues to work through the winter, I will be adding the "WD-40 in the hole" trick to my list of periodic maintenance items.

So far, so good. Thanks again , Rockguy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Derbydad, thank you for the posts and the trying out the WD-40 straw trick. I hope it works long term! I give it a quick shot every couple months keeping my fingers crossed that it is helping. I know some may not agree with the methodology and still want to pull the mechanism out if they wanted to inspect further. I wouldn’t blame someone who wanted to do so anyway. I figure that it may help someone who doesn’t have the time or desire to open up the door. Looking forward to seeing more after it (and you) warm up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
Alas, 'twas not to be. :( It's 18° F and the door failed to stay latched.

I was smart enough to wait to test it with temps in the teens until today (Saturday) when I had no place to go. After the failure, I ran the van with the heat set to Hi for about 20 minutes and tried the door multiple times both manually and under power, all with no luck. Just so we're clear as to what my symptoms are, I cannot close the door manually once the rear pops open. It sort of hits a hard stop when there's about an 1/2" open at the rear. (Yes, the plastic latch is in the correct position, that is not what it is hitting.) I am assuming that that is same for everyone with a latch motor failure.

Giving up on trying to get the door to latch, I decided to tie it closed again. One last time, I manually closed it as far as it would go and noticed that it seemed to close just a little bit farther. I turned the power back on, hit the dash switch to open it and then again close it. This time it latched and stayed latched.

I think I'm going to set a mid-20's lower limit and not use the door below that. Come spring, I'll pull the lath motor and see what's going on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Could also be a stiff hinge on the center roller. That's what caused my door issue. Pulled the center rollers to see if it needed repair, rollers were still good. That's when I discovered the hinge would not move. I used WD40 and couple pliers to get it free, then lubed with lithium grease. After reassembly, the door worked properly with the motor. And my issue with random overnight battery drains disappeared
Lacking a garage, this would still be a springtime repair for me in the warmer weather. :giggle:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
Could also be a stiff hinge on the center roller. That's what caused my door issue. Pulled the center rollers to see if it needed repair, rollers were still good. That's when I discovered the hinge would not move. I used WD40 and couple pliers to get it free, then lubed with lithium grease. After reassembly, the door worked properly with the motor. And my issue with random overnight battery drains disappeared
Lacking a garage, this would still be a springtime repair for me in the warmer weather. :giggle:
Thanks for the suggestion, but I replaced the roller about 6 months ago when I replaced the sliding door motor. The hinge was taken apart, cleaned, etc. at that time.

I've never had any battery drain issues. I've heard about that being a problem but I don't know why that is involved in this. Do you know what causes the the battery drain for those that experience it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
The battery drain (0.4 amps) is caused by bad microswitches in the rear latch module.
Apparently that is not my issue, as least as far as I know of.

My door is either fully latched. (no light, no alarm) or not even close to latched. Once the rear pops, it is free to slide open on its own. As long as I keep the interior lights set to off, I've never experience a dead battery, although I've never checked for parasitic draw.

Since my issue is temperature dependent, it could be a totally different issue. Maybe not even latch motor related.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Derbydad, thank you for the posts and the trying out the WD-40 straw trick. I hope it works long term! I give it a quick shot every couple months keeping my fingers crossed that it is helping. I know some may not agree with the methodology and still want to pull the mechanism out if they wanted to inspect further. I wouldn’t blame someone who wanted to do so anyway. I figure that it may help someone who doesn’t have the time or desire to open up the door. Looking forward to seeing more after it (and you) warm up!
08 EX with just shy of 170k. Driver side slider started acting up out of the blue around a month ago. It’s been intermittent since then - the only noticeable symptom being the annoying door ajar alarm going on and on and on - fortunately it’s been off more than on.
It came on again two days ago and I lubed the latch mechanism via Rockguy’s wd40 straw suggestion. And it worked! At least so far....:)
Full disclosure, I used silicone spray instead of wd40 - in my experience wd40 will provide some lubrication but it is not the best and definitely short lived. I would’ve used sprayable lithium based lube if I could have found the can (still not organized after recent move).
Some great info here, I really appreciate everyone sharing their knowledge and experience.
 
41 - 57 of 57 Posts
Top