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My wife's 2004 EX-RES is now over 65,000 miles and I have no idea if/when the plugs were ever changed, I haven't changed them in the 3 years I've had the van. Looking at some of the threads here it looks like it is fairly simple, use a hex key to get the coil packs off then you gain access to the plugs themselves. My question is the probability of a plug being seized into the head, is this common at all? How do I go about removing the plugs with the least likelihood of breaking a plug off in there?

I will use a small length of tubing to put the new plugs in to make sure I don't cross any threads and will put some anti seize on them too but if these van's are knows for having seized plugs I will most likely bring it to my mechanic to do.

Thanks guys
 

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2011 Odyssey LX, 120k miles
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I had no problems when I replaced in my '99 at 105k miles. No problems again just now at 190k miles. Antiseize is good to use.

I found that my spark plug socket (5/8"?) was a near-perfect fit in the metal tube that the coil fits in. Like 1 mm or less of clearance. So this alone makes it virtually impossible to cross-thread.

6mm allen wrench for the coils. If you want to be extra careful, put some dielectric grease on the end of the coil, where the coil rubber meets the spark plug ceramic.

But the plugs are supposed to last 105k miles, and mine did that just fine, so I don't think you need to be overly concerned on this.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great thanks! I wasn't aware they were rated for 105k, I'll just leave them alone then. Anything specific I should do to the Ody for 65k? I change oil regularly and just changed the air filter last week.
 

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My question is the probability of a plug being seized into the head, is this common at all?
I've replaced plugs on 4 different 3rd generation Odys, all at around 105K miles. 24 plugs, and no issues with any plug being seized. That being said, I did use anti-seize when I installed the new plugs.
 

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Anti-seize is always a good idea when installing steel plugs in an aluminum head. Just a small amount is all you need, I put a "line" of anti-seize down one side of the plug's threads. As you turn the plug in it will spread the anti-seize along the threads.

I've pulled plugs out that were installed properly (broke loose, twisted out by hand) and installed without anti-seize (fought ALL THE WAY OUT). Considering how long the plugs are supposed to stay in, it's cheap and easy insurance to put a little dab on.

Dale
 
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