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Nice writeup! I just fixed my 2002. I soaked the 23mm nut in PB Blaster for a few hours and it came off with a breaker bar.

And the wiper arm shaft was corroded in the housing for me too. I pressed it out, sanded and lubed it but the motor still didn't work. I pulled off the motor and the brushes were in bad shape. I sanded off the scorch marks, sanded down the brush heads, and pressed the brushes in some. With everything reassembled, it works again!

That circlip is very hard to see for tired old eyes. I didn't notice it (or the washer) until I brought the thing inside and put it on a bench.

BTW: The philips head screws holding the motor together are PH2. If you can find a PH2 drive, they are easy to remove.
 

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rtw_travel you are the bomb!

I have an 2003 that I have owned since new and my rear wiper packed in last week, followed your excellent DIY instructions and at the cost of a 23mm socket at the local Canadian Tire store it's as good or better than it's been in a long time.

Posts like yours are what this forum I s all about!

Cheers
 

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When my wiper motor failed the brushes were shot and I could not repair reliably, bought new unit online from partstrain I believe and saved a few bucks and got a new motor, done.
 

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I am thankful for this thread! The thread helped me a lot, so I will add my tips if there are still folks with this rear wiper problem. I have an 11-year-old 2005 Odyssey that is still running well. Like everyone else here, the rear wiper started going slow. My dealer noticed this when I had them change the wiper blade. I was told I would need a new wiper motor and it would cost $350-$500. I was thinking (at that price) seeing out the rear window in the rain or snow is overrated and told them I would think about it. Two months later, sure enough it stopped working.

I am happy to say that with the help of this thread, especially rtw_travel's step-by-step instructions and pictures, I was successful! It took me about 5 hours of doing and a few more hours of web surfing to get the job done. If I knew what I know now, I could probably do it in 2 hours

Here are some thoughts:
-My wiper motor works fine, and looked pretty new inside. My problem, like many others who contributed to this thread, was the shaft was corroded and could not turn. Dealers may think it is just better to swap out the whole motor for their own reasons, but I am glad I did this fix. I am far from a master mechanic. It did take longer than I thought, but hey, for $500 I'll do it.
-If the wiper is moving slow, don't wait! Letting it seize up probably makes it harder to do the fix.
-To get the trim panel off, you must remove trim in the following order: upper trim, left and right side trims, grab handle, then large tailgate trim panel. I bought a $6 trim removal tool pack from Harbor Freight that helped, but I wish I had gotten the longer set that they had. I ended up using a garden tool that is about 1 foot long with a V (snake tongue) tip to get under the heads of the plastic holding clips, then turn to pop each one out. I found some instruction sheet titled Trim Removal/Installation-Tailgate 20-61 that looks like it came from Honda that helped. I think it is on an odyclub thread (I can't remember which).
-Read this thread (especially rtw_travel's posts) from start to finish for other instructions and tips.
-The most difficult part for me was getting the 23mm nut off. In my case, I think it was mandatory to get the nut off. The plan B many have used was to skip the 23 mm nut removal (usually after trying for hours) and to remove the shaft by pounding it through the motor casing while still attached to the window. I tried this for a bit but couldn't get it to budge. After eventually getting the 23mm nut off I could take the motor with the shaft out and work on the shaft removal on a workbench. The pounding it took to get the shaft out was more than my rear window probably could have taken. So, get the 23mm nut off if possible!
-On getting the 23 mm nut off, I would suggest the best type of oil to loosen stuck nuts and bolts you can get. You will need a deep 23mm socket ($5 from Lowe's). Removing it with a socket wrench was not successful (almost popped my eyes out of my sockets). My neighbor had an impact wrench that finally did the trick (he said it was fairly inexpensive at Harbor Freight). For those not familiar with this, it looks like a hand drill, but produces more torque and turns slower than a drill. The increased torque and probably the vibration of the impact wrench finally let me turn the nut. It took many turns to finally see the nut was coming off. I started wondering if it was reverse threaded. It was not. So go counter clockwise to remove the nut. I would also suggest more oil even while removing it to preserve the threads since the threads and counter threads will be very rusty (you don't want them to disintegrate during this step).
-After removing the motor casing from the window, you still have to open it up to pound the shaft out. Take pictures of the gears and "locomotive" arm positions. Use a marker to mark which hole in the larger gear the arm is in. Putting it back in the wrong hole I guess makes a difference. To remove the shaft, prop the casing up on 2 pieces of wood and use a punch to the outside end of the shaft. I also used a long blunt end screw since the punch was too short toward the end.
-Use lots of rubber compatible silicone grease after sanding down the corrosion.

Thanks to all the contributors to this thread! I am so glad I didn't have to go back to the dealer with the door and motor torn apart to have them complete the fix.

Good luck!
 

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excellent guidance from all! thank you! my 2003 is happy again.

my project lasted overnight as I let the 23mm nut soak with Liquid Wrench and mulled using an impact driver so close to the window ..

the 23mm deep impact socket is my new best friend. odd how my socket set skipped 23mm, so a trip to the store was needed. no way I could have removed the nut without it. not surprising for a life in salty Chicago winters. surprisingly, the motor shaft was not hard to remove, and only lightly corroded.

I have not seen others comment in detail on two items I'd suggest taking more care with ..

1) the cover for the rear door has 8 snaps ( in addition to screws ). three down low. four near the top edge .. and one on the wiper motor housing. this last one is not so much a snap as an attach point that should be released by sliding the door cover up ( toward the hinge & away from the lock ). i broke this last one off when all the other snaps were released .. and when it fell, the plastic tip of the lock handle snapped off. if i were to do this again, i'd have a helper supporting the door cover just behind ( underneath with the door open ) the wiper motor to prevent it from breaking off when the full weight of the cover is released from the other snaps onto that one point.

2) the lock mechanism on the electrical connector is unlike any other i've seen on this or other Honda vehicles I've fumbled with. the locking mechanism is shaped like an "H" with elongated "legs". the cross segment ( circled with blue in the attached ) on the "H" must be raised ( away from the body of the connector ) to release the connector. use a small pick ( maybe a gasket removal tool ) to lift it
Inked20200119_092224_LI.jpg
 
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