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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just took our 2000 EX for the 30K maintenance. We didn't take it to a dealer, but an authorized Honda repair shop.

I was told that the rotors had to be turned and brake pads replaced. so I have 2 questions.

1 - Are rotors covered under the original Factory Warranty? - I'm assuming that brake pads are not.

2 - If I don't feel any vibration nor see any grooving on the rotors, do they really need to be turned?
 

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If I were replacing the pads myself, I would avoid turning the rotors unless I felt vibration. That being said, the norm for places that offer "lifetime" warranties on brake jobs seems to be to turn the rotors. Was that just part of the deal, or did they person say you really needed to turn the rotors? Any justification from the shop?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No justification, just told me that the rotors had to be turned. I pressed, but didn't get any real good answers.

I've done this type of maintenance on my other cars so looks like I need to buy some pads. Any suggestions?
 

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I have never turned the rotors on my Integra and don't plan to unless they are warped (pedal vibrates). My feeling is that when you turn them, they are thinner and more suceptible to warping. I think the new pads will seat to the grooves in the rotors quickly. I would recommend only Honda pads.
 

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I've got 167,000 miles on my VW Golf GT and I always have done the front pad installs myself. (I used to do the rears also, but not last time). I have NEVER had the rotors (or the rear drums) turned. Not once. I wouldn't do it unless you felt vibration in the pedal on braking. Sure you can see some grooves in the rotors, but I feel they don't affect braking unless they are scored deeply.

The only thing I can say about this situation is this (and this is one possible reason shops love to turn the rotors): if the rotors are not smooth (a little rippled) and the new pads are smooth (as they are), when you first step on the brakes after the pads are changed, you might feel the braking is inefficient. If might take more pressure or a longer time to stop. It takes a few stops to allow the new pads to develop corresponding ripples that match the ones in the rotors. I could imagine all the customers coming back to shops saying, "Hey, you just replaced my brakes, and they don't work so well".

The other reason shops like to turn the rotors is $. They get a few bucks to turn the rotors, and you will have to have the rotors replaced after a few brake jobs.

Bryan


[This message has been edited by schuckb (edited 01-31-2002).]
 

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If you have done brake jobs in the past, and don't mind getting dirty, I would suggest doing it yourself. The calipers on my 2002 looked pretty standard. Either of the normal parts distributors listed around here will carry Honda pads.
 

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Don't turn them unless there is vibration. By the way, the vibration will be in the steering wheel, not the pedal, on front discs. I have always replaced the pads myself and never had them turned unless warped. Never had a problem. If you do it yourself, make sure to use the anti-squealing shims and compound on the backs of the pads. The compound is a thick black goo, and it came with the Honda pads for my Accord. And save yourself some grief, use only Honda pads. Others will likely squeal, grind, and wear out faster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all of the advise.

Will pick a set of pads from the dealer or an online source that sells genuine Honda parts.

Can the front caliper pistons simply be pushed back or do they need to be rotated at the same time?
 

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Just push the pistons back, being careful to not damage the rubber.

127,000 miles on my 99 Ody EX. Front pads replaced at 60,000 and 120,000 miles. Rotors not turned yet.
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">I have never turned the rotors on my Integra and don't plan to unless they are warped (pedal vibrates).</font>
Do keep in mind that Honda's recommendation is that NEW rotors should be turned on the car at the time of install.

And indeed, I found out firsthand that this is good advice. If you don't, you'll immediately have vibration during braking. And it won't go away on its own.
 

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I got a 01 EX with about 20,000Km on it and I took it in to my regular Honda Dealer for the 18k service. I mentioned to them that both rotors had deep scoring on them and I felt some pulsation from the brake pedal when I brake fast from high speed.

When I pick up the car, they turn the rotors under warranty. I didn't ask them to and I wish they had asked me first. Now I'm worry about getting them warp.

If they do become warp in the future I hope Honda will give me new rotors at that time. Do people think Honda will replace them in the future if they become warp, I guess having them turn at 20k is early, is it?

We got a 98 A4 and Audi say they never turn the rotors, buy new ones if you need them.

[This message has been edited by Saltygarfy (edited 02-05-2002).]
 

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Turning the rotors isn't necessarily a bad thing, it is necessary in certain situations, such as if they are warped already or are grooved too much. Turning unnecessarily just removes metal and makes them thinner, which in the long run makes them wear out quicker. I don't think having them turned will make them more or less likely to warp.

If there was a problem with your brakes causing grooves, then turning them and replacing whatever caused the grooves was probably the right thing to do. I just think we wouldn't recommend turning rotors when you change brake pads if the rotors have no problems.
 

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I had noticed a slight vibration when braking at highway speeds on my 2000 LX. With 32K miles, dealer turned the rotors and replaced the brake pads - UNDER WARRANTY! Can't complain about that! Point is, if you are being told that rotors need to be turned, I would take it to the dealer and ask that it be done as warranty work. If they turn the rotors, they should replace the pads at no cost to you.

[This message has been edited by fourmoshers (edited 02-05-2002).]
 

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Some of you may have had good luck just slapping on new pads, but I don't believe that it is good practice.

If your rotors are warped, they have been stressed (or stress relieved) I'd replace them, because they will likely warp again, next time they go through a rapid heating/cooling cycle. The Brembo's I have been using on my Maxima run around 70 bucks blank, about $110 drilled and slotted (each), so it is not a horrible expense. OEM rotors could be higher, discouraging people from replacing them. As a side note, BMW specifies rotor replacement for the M3 ANY time pads are replaced.

More seriously, though, is replacing pads on scored rotors. Pad material is HARD. It does not just conform to the scored pattern for many hundreds, possibly thousands of miles. Because the pads initially touch on only a fraction of the braking surface (only the highest spot) they cannot be properly seated (also called bedding in), plus they can fade almost instantly on a demanding stop (like emergency braking 80 mph to 30mph or so) because the little touch area can't handle the heat build up. Not a good way to find out. I learned this the first (and only) time I just put pads on the front of my (then) '85 Mustang GT. It felt like there was oil on the discs. After I had the discs turned, the same pads worked fine.

Taking the discs off is not a big job, and turning them is inexpensive. It would seem like foregoing a lot of quality-of-repair for minor savings in time or money. Granted, that's only an opinion (mine)

Cheers,
John
 

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My take on turning rotors: it is clear in the Honda (Helm) service manual that there is a runout limit on rotors, at which time rotors should be turned. Also, visual inspection for score lines, etc... is needed too.

I think the main issue is that most shops don't take the time to use a dial indicator to measure runnout, since it's easier and more convenient to just turn the rotor and know that they are true.

On the other hand, most guys who change their own pads don't have the equipment to measure and/or turn the rotors, so thus they just replace the pads. (again, most convenient)

The really right way is to check and see if they require it. Not many people actually do this though.....

So, it boils down to a call made by the individuals, what they are comfortable with. Like anything else, there's recommended procedure, there's what people prefer, and there's what's convenient. To each their own, but people should make informed choices.

My 2 cents.

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-Shin John
'01 DEP EX, and I'm workin' on it! (slowly)
 
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