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I've noticed my '08 Odyssey Touring is slipping a little too much on wet roads even with a light foot. With winter coming, should I get a set of winter tires and then come spring get other tires? Or should I just get all season tires. On a tighter budget but I want what is best as I am a young driver! Also I live in northeast ohio.
I'm in Colorado, and have All Season Goodyear Triple Tread tires. They are great in snow and ice even in our snowy mountains on this heavy Ody with front wheel drive. They have lasted extremely well since I keep after the pressure and rotations twice a year. The tires look like they were designed by a kid with a CAD system, and I was skeptical at first. They have been great tires.

By contrast, I had a Subaru where the OEM tires were lousy and I would spin out on ice. So I got some Kumho Izens with cheap rims for winter. It was a twice a year ritual to swap them. I'd say the Subaru performed better, but not by much. It used to get high centered in deep snow, but the winter tires could literally climb up and out in most cases.

Four wheel drive has the advantage in snow only when the wheels are turning. Once you use the brakes, it makes no difference whether you have FWD or AWD. So, in snowy/ icy conditions, you get better tracking by downshifting and letting the wheels turn. Also, I found that antilock braking pulses are not guite as effective as a human who knows how to pulse the brakes for given conditions. Most problems going off the road in winter are related to going too fast for conditions and not leaving enough room ahead.
 

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I was recently reading about the Michelin Crossclimate all weather tires on Tirerack. They rate in the 9's for all the criteria they look at. Ratings are also excellent. I'd be putting those on if I was in need of tires.
 

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I live in upstate New York & we’ve always had studded snow tires on 5 civics & 3 Odyssey’s. We are in one of NY’s “ higher elevations “ , so get lots of ice & simply cannot get up the hilly roads to home without the studs.
 

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It is like this - if you have ever stepped on the brakes and kept right on going with no control, unable to steer, unable to slow down - then you need a set (4) of snow/ice tires. Tested: Winter vs. All-Season vs. Summer Tires on Ice I Tire RackThose
and Winter tires VS All Season Tires. Proof that you need WINTER TIRES!!
I learned to drive in the snow and ice. I have driven tractor-trailer over thirty years with twenty of them hauling gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel on snow and ice during the wintertime. I do run snow/ice tires on my CRV. I have a brand new set of all-season tires on my Ody. Those new all seasons will be more than adequate in the traction area for one year. Next year I may have to put snow/ice tires on the Ody. If we have a bad ice storm, the Ody will stay in the garage. If I need to go somewhere, the CRV will be called into duty. If the roads are iced up like a hockey rink, neither car will move!!! I love driving on powery snow, but ice is unforgiving!!!
 

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just to make sure he realizes that your idea is the old idea (to get all-season tires, if can afford only one set), before "All Weather" type tires were available, as they are now. Again, the unique in ability and durability Michellin Cross Climate tire, is the one that Consumer Reports, including in their videos, has recommended for those who want one tire for both seasons. Not going to be ideal in high speed summer, and not going to be as sticky in extreme cold, but amazing abilities for everything in between. That's a biiiig deal in tire engineering.
Didn't realize All season tire was such an "Old" idea LMAO.
And Michelin cross climate IS an all season tire. But I definitely wouldn't recommend it for someone on a "budget".
 
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