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Discussion Starter #1
I've found tire siping to be a very effective and inexpensive way to gaining traction (especially on wet, icy, and snowy roads). Last year I had the tires on our '94 Nissan Quest sipped. It cost about $40 for the 4 tires. I was so impressed with the results I just had the tires on our new Ody sipped. What really sold me was being able to get around after a snow storm last year. I picked up one of our neighbors on a hill. His truck with snow chains couldn't stop slipping on the steep slopes. The siped tires did great. We had a snow storm here last night and this morning and my wife is driving around with the new Ody and its siped tires. The siping process does not remove any rubber. Rather, it places nearly invisible 90 degrees cuts in the treads. In all my research and experience I can find no draw backs to siping tires. The benefits include: increased tractiong, longer tire life, softer ride. To find out more - go to www.sipers.com. This week Discount Tires had a special and I paid $5 per tire for my new Ody. I highly recommend this if you live in an area where there is any ice or snow.

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2002 EXL-RES Starlight Silver
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The siping process would require an additional step (and cost) after the tire is actually made. I believe therefore it is primarily a cost issue BUT siping the tires generally extends the life of the tire and that may not be something tire mgf. want to do.

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2002 EXL-RES Starlight Silver
 

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""Do you turn off TCS when climbing a hill with ice or snow?""

Why would you? Those kinds of conditions are exactly what the TCS is designed to do.
 

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What I'm getting tired of is new members posting what seems like advertisement threads.

This "siping" nonsense is just something tire stores do to make extra money. And this post from Silverstreak (nothing personal) reads like an Ad from one of those tire stores.

I've had tires siped once before and noticed ZERO benefit in handling, wear, or traction. What do you think Goodyear (or others) thinks about honoring warranty claims on SIPED tires???

These tire manufacturers have experienced engineers and expensive computers with fancy software to design their tire threads. In my opinion it is a major stretch to say that some tire store worker scratching up a tire is going to do something beneficial to such a carefully engineered product.

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2002 Mesa Beige EX-L-RES w/ misaligned, hard to close driver door

[This message has been edited by pummal (edited 01-26-2002).]
 

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Never heard of this process before.
Can someone explain one thing to me?
How is it you get increased traction AND better tire wear/life?
This is an oxymoron. If the sipping process does in fact work to increase traction as stated, it should DECREASE tire life.
I'm really skeptical of this process. Somebody show me some data.

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-Shin John
'01 DEP EX, and I'm workin' on it! (slowly)
 

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http://groups.google.com/groups?q=siping+tire&hl=en&selm=3B37D157.EA14F458%40att.net&rnum=2

http://list.miata.net/miata/1998-12/4676.html

As far as I'm concerned, the tires that come with the Ody have enough siping.

Some $10/hr guy in a tire shop is going to know how much siping my tires need better than Michelin? Too, I'm not interested in voiding the warranty on the tires, nor in losing control on dry pavement due to smaller tread blocks.

IMHO, siping sounds about as necessary as the "Midwest Protection Package."

Regards,

Maugham
 

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Ever heard of the thingy that when wrapped around the fuel line increases the engine performance while decreases the fuel consumption? The results are confirmed by "independent" laboratories!

I know at least one chain store is selling that thing.

-- Hoa
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by soldbear:
Ever heard of the thingy that when wrapped around the fuel line increases the engine performance while decreases the fuel consumption?...</font>
Hey, I'd like to buy one - and wear it. Maybe it works on people!
 

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Wouldn't siping your tires void any manufacturer warranty? Many new tires come with treadwear warranties over 50,000 miles, and some with guaranteed replacement. Hate to lose that for a process that is questionable for today's tires that already have advanced tread design and compounds.
 

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While siping may help put more contact to the road which provides more traction and reduce heat, it does promote heel-and-toe wear and more tread flexing during corner.
 

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It used to be SNAKE OIL. Now it's SIPED TIRES!

www.sipers.com is available for sale!

"A fool and his money are soon parted"

[This message has been edited by f18hornet (edited 02-13-2002).]

[This message has been edited by f18hornet (edited 02-13-2002).]
 

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Siping goes way back and may have been benefical on 40s or 50s(or maybe even 60s) tires. Tire technology has come a long way since the days we thought we had something good if we had bias-ply tires with nylon cords. These days, one wouldn't install those tires on a wheelbarrow.

Jerry O.

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2001 Odyssey GG LX
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Jerry O:
Siping goes way back and may have been benefical on 40s or 50s(or maybe even 60s) tires. Tire technology has come a long way since the days we thought we had something good if we had bias-ply tires with nylon cords. These days, one wouldn't install those tires on a wheelbarrow.

Jerry O.

</font>
That's an excellent point.

When I was a kid in the 50's, we'd "sipe" any new shoes we got. Even if there was a tread pattern, siping shoes did help back then. My grandfather had siped his shoes for years.

I haven't siped a shoe for maybe 20 years. Maybe the tire industry has kept up with (or surpassed) the shoe industry
!

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Regards,

Maugham
_ ________________________ _

"I plan to live forever. So far, so good"
'02 RP EX-L
'85 Prelude
'01 Ninja folding aluminum scooter
'00 New Balance Model 658 Shoes w/ Green grass stains and '01 White Laces
Rockport MW351 Brown Boots (for winter) and '00 Brown Laces
 

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Don't forget the recent Ford Explorer tire problems, either. From a safety or liability perspective, it's not a very good idea. If your tires fail for any reason (tread separation, premature wear, etc.), having siped them would make it more difficult to collect damages from the manufacturer.
 

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DUTCH said:
""Do you turn off TCS when climbing a hill with ice or snow?""

Why would you? Those kinds of conditions are exactly what the TCS is designed to do.
Sorry for such a delay in replying :)

My experience says quite the opposite. I thought like you before I tried to climb an icy road one winter morning. TCS activated and run relentlessly, but the van just almost stopped, it literally crawled like a snail. I was afraid it could roll back (and there was already a line of cars in a mirror). I could not climb the hill, so I shamefully retracted to the side road while Caravan (!) roared past me uphill :eek: Then I turned off TCS and made the rest of that hill without any problems (I have good winter driving skills without TCS) :) Then I noticed that TCS doesn't help me at all when I start from a stop on ice or fresh snow - the van just slips around more than it pushs forward, if there is a slightest uphill. So I turned off TCS permanently (while on winter roads). I perfectly explained such a van behaviour to myself from a physical point of view, and didn't worry much about it since.

But I just wondered if Silverstreak also turned TCS off, or he got such a superior experience with TCS on, only because of that tire siping thing. Now when you suggested it should be OK with TCS in these conditions, I got puzzled again. Have you personally had the positive experience similar to Silverstreak's one, but with regular Ody tires? Is that possible that something was wrong with my TCS/tires/etc?
 

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Are you sure you haven't got the 'on' state for TCS backwards?

If the TCS light is off, it means that the traction control system is enabled. The light will then flash if wheelspin is corrected. If the light is on, TCS is entirely disabled.
 

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SuperDad said:
Are you sure you haven't got the 'on' state for TCS backwards?

If the TCS light is off, it means that the traction control system is enabled. The light will then flash if wheelspin is corrected. If the light is on, TCS is entirely disabled.
Yes, I am aware of all that, and I am absolutely sure. I turned TCS off to get the light on. In the occasion when I could not climb a hill TCS was so much on - light was flashing, tires were burning (yes, that's true, with TCS definitely working), Ody was not moving anywhere.
 
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