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Discussion Starter #1
1999 Ody. Manual sliding doors

I have been having problems with the interior lights and "Door Open" dash warning light (Passengers side sliding) flickering on and off when going over bumps.

So I took apart the switch and cleaned the contacts. The switch itself appears to be working OK now, but the problem persists. Further investigation revealed that the sliding door (manual) when closed wasn't making adequate contact with the switch, even though it appears closed from the outside. Pushing in on the door from the outside turns off the interior lights, until I drive over bumps again. I noticed a small rubber bumper about the size of a USD $0.25 on the door. Is that the part that completes the depression of the switch? And if so, I should be able to replace that or just shim it out, right?

Thanks,

Todd K.
 

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Here's One Solution For You

Here’s how I fixed the problem on my 2000 LX using a plastic clip to more fully compress the switch. It’s quick and easy despite my lengthy description.

1. At the dealer buy one plastic Clip, part # 91503-SZ3-003, $3.03. (There are about 10 of these on your plastic radiator fan shroud.) Back at home, park on level ground.

2. Open the sliding door. Get a dab of peanut butter, cake icing, or Nutella and put it on the switch where it contacts the door. Choose a sticky spread with a color that contrasts with your van’s paint. Apply only enough for the switch to leave a footprint on the door when it’s closed. You could use grease but water-soluble food makes clean-up easier.

3. Close the sliding door and immediately open it again. Find the switch’s footprint on the indentation at the back of the door. Take a permanent marker (i.e. Sharpie) and closely circle the footprint. You may need a small mirror. If you don’t have enough clearance to hold your marker, slide the door so the footprint circle is even with the wheel well. After the ink dries wipe off the spread.

4. Brace the door or have an assistant hold it so the footprint circle is even with the wheel well opening. Put a 10mm (25/64”) drill bit in your drill, and align it to make a hole through the footprint circle, using a small mirror if needed. Prior to drilling, pull the bit into the center of the circle hard enough for the tip to dent the thin metal. This creates a seat that leads the bit into the metal without drifting off target. Drill the hole.

5. Open the plastic clip, then push it into the hole. You’re done. No more flashing dome lights on bumpy roads and cloverleaves! If you want to check your work you can put fresh spread on the switch.

I used an expensive Honda clip but you can find similar plastic clips at auto parts stores. If you go this route, you should TEST the hole size/clip compatibility on a tin can prior to drilling your door. And make sure the Clip head is significantly bigger than the footprint.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for that. Something like that crossed my mind yesterday. I was going to glue a rubber pad there. For that matter, a blob of hot melt glue probably would have worked too. In the end though, I ended up adjusting the latch strike so the door would close in a bit more. The latch strike is on the rear of the door frame. it is the "U-bolt" looking thing held on by two large phillips head screws. It took an impact driver and few whacks with a hammer to get the screws loose.
 

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Explanation

You're welcome. On the latch strike solution, I saw that idea here, too, and even tried it. But I changed my mind because I've had the sticking door problem and thought, "Why am I pressing the door even harder into those sticky rubber seals?" (Even though the seals don't stick anymore since I replaced them and keep silicon spray on them.)

Also, I didn't like the way the door handle felt harder to pivot when opening and closing it. I've broken the handle once already due to the sticking doors, and don't want to replace it again.

So I moved my latch striker back into the old position, and used my Clip solution which works great. I hope your switch fix does just as well.
 

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Simple fix

I found a very simple way to fix this without having to drill out a hole. There is a little indention on the door back side of the door, about 4-5 inches above a rubber stopper. I washed this area down, and then cleaned it with a rubbing alcohol. Then I took a little felt cousin that I had laying around that we use for the bottom of chairs on our hardwood floors. I stuck this in the indentation and that fixed the problem. I now this is not as permeant of a solution, but it did the trick in under 2 minutes and $.20. I will wait and see if it falls off or has problems.

Also you might notice that there are clear stickers on the opposite side of where these contacts are supposed to be made.
 
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