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Please tell me you did not use Jiffy Lube's "T-Tech" service.

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I understand that if the fluid is crap (after 150K without changing) then it could very well cause the slippage if new fluid is used.
This is an internet legend. New ATF does not cause any automatic transmission to begin malfunctioning. I've purchased multiple used cars over the years that had between 65,000 to just over 100,000 miles. One had 155,000 miles (perfect, white 1998 Accord LX driven by a little old lady from north Texas...it was a bargain!).

None of these vehicles had any documented ATF servicing. Not once did I hesitate to do a 4x drain/refill as first order of business. All of them either continued running well, or ran better...one of them, a lot better.

in that case throw some lubeguard red in there.

if its oil related, that will sort it out.
Our ancient 1998 Accord LX needed 4x ATF drains/refills just to make the ATF red again. 4x more with Honda ATF. It ran much, much better in terms of shifting and eliminated transmission shudder at idle.

That Accord still had a worrisome, profound torque converter shudder under spirited acceleration. Lubegard (red bottle) fixed that. We put about 100,000 more miles on that car; best we ever paid for a car in terms of cost per mile.

I became a Lubegard convert after I used Lubegard to notably lessen harsh reverse gear engagement in both of our Odysseys. So, I did not hesitate to get another bottle and try it in our old Accord.

I'm thinking of just order some ATF and do a 3 drain-fill cycles to see if it helps.
I think that's a good idea. I'm pretty sure we all think that's a good idea.

After being so diligent with service since new, you probably let your guard down by trusting the shop to use a truly Honda-compatible ATF. "Import" + "equivalent" = Kryptonite.
As well, I'd still like to know exactly what ATF he did use.

Slipping is tough on the clutches. Don't drive it any more than absolutely necessary until the 3-times drain/fill is complete
Agreed. Very much agree with this! That rise in RPM before engagement, followed by an RPM drop as the clutch fully engages is called "flaring", and if it is doing this for other gears as well, the slipping involved will destroy the affected clutch packs in short order.

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The PCM will continually "learn" to a low but finite slip RPM target. This is to shed pump loadcaused by more head pressure than absolutely necessary.
dick, you might be talking about a different transmission design.

These Hondas don't have a PCM-directed constant maintained slip over any clutch package for any engaged gear, ever, for the Honda 5 and 6 speed boxes, at any throttle lever angle. I can't speak for the Gen 5 kit.

If that type of slip happens, it will eventually throw a 0720 code for the output shaft sensor due to a miscompare with expected values from the countershaft in that particular engaged gear (been there, done that, long story). The code can be cleared, as the actual physical sensor is not kaput.

On that note, back to the problem...for Nhu, is there a Check Engine Light illuminating during all of this?

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I'd still like to know the ATF he used. It doesn't sound like anything that our forum members have ever used (Honda OEM, Valvoline, AmSOil, Red Line, Mobil 1, etc.)

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You should probably read the rest of the posts before replying...
This, yes.

First two have been covered.

Last one is N/A; OP has restored operation.

This one is just an internet myth:
Correct transmission operation requires a certain amount of clutch particulate matter to be suspended in it. It is the friction modifier which is why a new transmission or rebuilt one must have a friction modifier added at the beginning.
If you ever have such a high concentration of the entire spectrum of transmission wear materials suspended in the ATF that it actually affects operation, that is really, really bad. Wear materials are not "the friction modifier."

We have two family friends who worked for Exxon-Mobil, one with product development, the other a chemist (now recently retired). We've had the occasional laugh over that internet myth. No ATF manufacturer ever adds solid material (particulate matter) to modify friction in any way (clutch kinetic, clutch static, shell bearing or ball bearing FM's), ever. There are several classes of compounds in solution to perform these functions. None of them result in suspended solids.

I have no idea how this myth has gained so much traction over the last few years.

"Overmaintaining" causes problems.
"Overmaintaining" doesn't "cause problems". If you have exactly the correct quantity of ATF during each servicing, you could perform a drain/refill every day, and not cause any difficulties. Clean ATF with a fresh additives package, clear of all contaminants is the ideal physical state for the ATF.

Scores of Odyclubbers use Magnefine filters in their ATF cooling loop return lines. At one time I had them on ALL of our Hondas (sold two of them, recently). By that internet legend, using those filters to remove suspended particles would cause the transmissions in those Hondas to slip. We have not observed that, ever.

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Brown means should be changed ASAP. It's black that should have you a little concerned.

You definitely should be changing fluid more often than that...at least every 30k.
Agreed.

2015OdyEXL189000, this is a bit far away from the OP's now-solved transmission problem on this thread, but here it is: common thinking on this forum for neglected ATF servicing is to perform the full ATF change of 4x ATF drains/refills. ATF has a relatively weaker detergent concentration (compared to motor oil), which means this: do a single drain/refill, and let the ATF do its job for a couple weeks of regular driving, or a month, or whatever. Then, do another ATF drain/refill, let it do its job for a couple weeks....rinse, wash, repeat.

2015OdyEXL189000, you have a van with close to 120,000 on the current load of ATF in the sump. Have vehicle owners (not just Odyclubbers) in this same situation had their automatic transmission quit working after that first drain/refill? It's happened, but it's not the newly introduced ATF that caused the mechanical calamity...it's the sheer neglect that causes things to stop working.

On the flip side, that "maybe a little shaky" transmission will never operate better if you don't replace that load of old, dark (not red) depleted ATF currently sitting in the sump of your 2015 Odyssey. It may actually run more smoothly and possibly last a whole lot longer if you change it, but it won't run better or potentially last longer if you do not.

No crystal ball here. I can't direct you what to do. If it were me? Heck yeah, I'd change it.

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I know that is different vs. the friction clutch you're talking about, just interesting maybe.
I had no idea such a thing existed.

After reading the link you posted, I'm awestruck. How do people come up with these fantastic ideas and make them work?

Just amazing.

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Read up on magnetorheological shocks... also awesome.

-Charlie
Also amazing...man, this would be useful for the Odyssey if you had a maxed out Yakima 4-bike rack and a couple of really big people sitting on the rear bench.

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