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Makes me wonder if the mechanic might have added 'his' secret' ATF additive? :)
Or, could it have been an electrical connection in one of the solenoid connectors that just happened to make good contact at the same time the ATF was changed?
One drain and fill causing that first problem almost immediately and the last drain and fill fixing that problem almost immediately . ???
Lots of 'IFs' :eek:
Buffalo4
PS: Very happy to hear that it is working well now. If that 'other' ATF is still suspect, I would surely do 3 more drain and fills.
 

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Well, I went to Walmart to pickup the order. They "substituted" ATF with engine oil because they ran out of ATF????

I'm done with "substitute", "compatible", and "equivalent"!

Must wait for tomorrow to go to the dealer to get DW1.
I would not use Honda atf
 

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o_O Same post, same time
I do mine ever 10k now that I did the 3 times fill and dran at the 3 time a change it which was at 280k on it i would say the bast thing I done recently was muzzled it its like a hole different van with all 6 cylinders love it
 

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in that case throw some lubeguard red in there.

if its oil related, that will sort it out.
I agree that stuff is good. I don't have that bad an issue but the mechanics all seem to think the Shop fluids are just fine.y. I just had my Volvo C70 trans fluid exchanged, not by sucking it out but tapping into the coolant line, keep pouring it in until it runs clear. Mechanic told me his Pennzoil fluid was just fine. Online everyone said use the factory non synthetic or Valvoline. I think they were right , when I punch it, the downshift is slower. Just an FYI the Volvo has an Aisin trans ( Toyota). Valvoline worked great in my Lexus cars. Going to take it back since I spent $300 doing this and see what he says

My Van is a 2000 with 170,000 and I keep it for home depot or costco runs. Still going great ( after a rebuilt tranny).
 

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Agree that the fluid is 100% to blame. And of course the mechanic too. I will talk to him to see what happened to his supply/process. He himself has been super nice. He would let me use the lift and tools for free if I'm inclined to fix small things myself when he is too busy. He only charge me when he has to do the work.

I find it amazing that 1 fluid change (1/3 volume) can make a smooth-like-butter car a jerky one so fast. And I am sure he put ATF, not piss or engine oil :).
I would tell him exactly how the vehicle behaved just before and immediately after he drained and filled the transmission fluid.
Ask him what fluid he used, and recommend he never use it for Honda Odyssey transmissions. Tell him that you changed the fluid three times and after each change, the shifting improved dramatically.
If you feel comfortable asking him to pay for his mistake (you say he lets you use the garage equipment when possible and he doesn't always charge you for work), let him know what it cost you for three transmission fluid changes.
 

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Agree that the fluid is 100% to blame. And of course the mechanic too. I will talk to him to see what happened to his supply/process. He himself has been super nice. He would let me use the lift and tools for free if I'm inclined to fix small things myself when he is too busy. He only charge me when he has to do the work.

I find it amazing that 1 fluid change (1/3 volume) can make a smooth-like-butter car a jerky one so fast. And I am sure he put ATF, not piss or engine oil :).
If an incorrect fluid was used, or if the transmission was not filled properly (under or over full), it will cause shifting problems. When you drained and filled the transmission, did you put back the same amount that was removed?
Also, when you checked the fluid level when hot, was the car in park, or neutral, and on a level surface?
 

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I have been very careful with the van since the beginning (Muzzled, ATF change every oil change). Everything works great so far. Today I changed ATF and the van immediately started slipping after that. As I speed up, I can see the RPM moves up and down as if it is gear hunting but I think it's just compensating for the slippage. Sometimes, letting go of the brake will not move the van and I have to give it gas >1-1.5K RPM to actually move it.
The van is 2017, 67K km.
I used to do all my ATF change, this is the only time I did it at the garage. I guess that was the mistake??? I'm thinking of just order some ATF and do a 3 drain-fill cycles to see if it helps. Is this a good idea. It has been running perfectly before the ATF change so I don't think there is damage to it.
Thanks for your inputs.
Either you are waiting too long to change your engine oil or your wasting money changing the ATF fluid too often. Engine oil and filter should be changed about ever 7500 miles. ATF can go 30 k miles . The next quest is what ATF are you using? You need to use the right one, otherwise you will have problems. Lastly, did you check to make sure you didn't leak out any fluid?
 

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Either you are waiting too long to change your engine oil or your wasting money changing the ATF fluid too often. Engine oil and filter should be changed about ever 7500 miles. ATF can go 30 k miles . The next quest is what ATF are you using? You need to use the right one, otherwise you will have problems. Lastly, did you check to make sure you didn't leak out any fluid?
You should probably read the rest of the posts before replying...
 

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are you sure its not a bad pressure switch?

there were some other posts of pressure switches going bad with low mileage like you on 2017's.

what are the exact symptoms?

MrRangerZr1 as always did a great job documenting this.

I suspect one or more:
  • wrong transmission fluid - only use Honda DW1. It's inexpensive and guaranteed to be correct. Drain and refill with DW1 3 times to get concentration of correct fluid high enough for proper operation. Never use chemical flushes - they damage clutch packs and void warranties per Honda Service Manual.
  • underfilled or overfilled transmission fluid level. Check fluid level: 1. Run engine to "hot" - engine cooling fan comes on twice. 2. Shut off engine and within 60 seconds: pull and wipe transmission dipstick, reinsert, and pull for level reading. If low, top up with DW1. If overfilled, drain or siphon fluid (easiest) to adjust to the correct amount of fluid.
  • too frequent transmission fluid drain and fills (changes). This should only be done when the maintenance minder indicates. Correct transmission operation requires a certain amount of clutch particulate matter to be suspended in it. It is the friction modifier which is why a new transmission or rebuilt one must have a friction modifier added at the beginning. "Overmaintaining" causes problems.
  • clutch packs are failing - rebuild or replace transmission
 

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You should probably read the rest of the posts before replying...
First two have been covered.

Last one is N/A; OP has restored operation.

This one is just an internet myth:
Correct transmission operation requires a certain amount of clutch particulate matter to be suspended in it. It is the friction modifier which is why a new transmission or rebuilt one must have a friction modifier added at the beginning.
If you ever have such a high concentration of the entire spectrum of transmission wear materials suspended in the ATF that it actually affects operation, that is really, really bad. Wear materials are not "the friction modifier."

We have two family friends who worked for Exxon-Mobil, one with product development, the other a chemist (now recently retired). We've had the occasional laugh over that internet myth. No ATF manufacturer ever adds solid material (particulate matter) to modify friction in any way (clutch kinetic, clutch static, shell bearing or ball bearing FM's), ever. There are several classes of compounds in solution to perform these functions. None of them result in suspended solids.

I have no idea how this myth has gained so much traction over the last few years.

"Overmaintaining" causes problems.
"Overmaintaining" doesn't "cause problems". If you have exactly the correct quantity of ATF during each servicing, you could perform a drain/refill every day, and not cause any difficulties. Clean ATF with a fresh additives package, clear of all contaminants is the ideal physical state for the ATF.

Scores of Odyclubbers use Magnefine filters in their ATF cooling loop return lines. At one time I had them on ALL of our Hondas (sold two of them, recently). By that internet legend, using those filters to remove suspended particles would cause the transmissions in those Hondas to slip. We have not observed that, ever.

OF
 

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0dyfamily. So I bought a 2015 minivan with maybe one ATF change at around 80k miles. Now the van has 197k miles. The transmission is fine, maybe a little shaky around 30mph but nothing major. Do you recommend a change the ATF even if the color is brown?!?!!?
 

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0dyfamily. So I bought a 2015 minivan with maybe one ATF change at around 80k miles. Now the van has 197k miles. The transmission is fine, maybe a little shaky around 30mph but nothing major. Do you recommend a change the ATF even if the color is brown?!?!!?
Brown means should be changed ASAP. It's black that should have you a little concerned.

You definitely should be changing fluid more often than that...at least every 30k.
 

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Brown means should be changed ASAP. It's black that should have you a little concerned.

You definitely should be changing fluid more often than that...at least every 30k.
Agreed.

2015OdyEXL189000, this is a bit far away from the OP's now-solved transmission problem on this thread, but here it is: common thinking on this forum for neglected ATF servicing is to perform the full ATF change of 4x ATF drains/refills. ATF has a relatively weaker detergent concentration (compared to motor oil), which means this: do a single drain/refill, and let the ATF do its job for a couple weeks of regular driving, or a month, or whatever. Then, do another ATF drain/refill, let it do its job for a couple weeks....rinse, wash, repeat.

2015OdyEXL189000, you have a van with close to 120,000 on the current load of ATF in the sump. Have vehicle owners (not just Odyclubbers) in this same situation had their automatic transmission quit working after that first drain/refill? It's happened, but it's not the newly introduced ATF that caused the mechanical calamity...it's the sheer neglect that causes things to stop working.

On the flip side, that "maybe a little shaky" transmission will never operate better if you don't replace that load of old, dark (not red) depleted ATF currently sitting in the sump of your 2015 Odyssey. It may actually run more smoothly and possibly last a whole lot longer if you change it, but it won't run better or potentially last longer if you do not.

No crystal ball here. I can't direct you what to do. If it were me? Heck yeah, I'd change it.

OF
 

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First two have been covered.

Last one is N/A; OP has restored operation.

This one is just an internet myth:
If you ever have such a high concentration of the entire spectrum of transmission wear materials suspended in the ATF that it actually affects operation, that is really, really bad. Wear materials are not "the friction modifier."

We have two family friends who worked for Exxon-Mobil, one with product development, the other a chemist (now recently retired). We've had the occasional laugh over that internet myth. No ATF manufacturer ever adds solid material (particulate matter) to modify friction in any way (clutch kinetic, clutch static, shell bearing or ball bearing FM's), ever. There are several classes of compounds in solution to perform these functions. None of them result in suspended solids.

I have no idea how this myth has gained so much traction over the last few years.

"Overmaintaining" doesn't "cause problems". If you have exactly the correct quantity of ATF during each servicing, you could perform a drain/refill every day, and not cause any difficulties. Clean ATF with a fresh additives package, clear of all contaminants is the ideal physical state for the ATF.

Scores of Odyclubbers use Magnefine filters in their ATF cooling loop return lines. At one time I had them on ALL of our Hondas (sold two of them, recently). By that internet legend, using those filters to remove suspended particles would cause the transmissions in those Hondas to slip. We have not observed that, ever.

OF
Good stuff as always Odyfamily. (y)

Back in the 80's when I was still driving my first car ever, I worked in a lab with a project looking at using a magnetic particle clutch as part of an "ECAT" = Electronically Controlled Automatic Transmission program. (i.e., what every AT is today, but back then it was research)


I know that is different vs. the friction clutch you're talking about, just interesting maybe.
 

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I know that is different vs. the friction clutch you're talking about, just interesting maybe.
I had no idea such a thing existed.

After reading the link you posted, I'm awestruck. How do people come up with these fantastic ideas and make them work?

Just amazing.

OF
 

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I had no idea such a thing existed.

After reading the link you posted, I'm awestruck. How do people come up with these fantastic ideas and make them work?

Just amazing.

OF
Read up on magnetorheological shocks... also awesome.

-Charlie
 
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Read up on magnetorheological shocks... also awesome.

-Charlie
Also amazing...man, this would be useful for the Odyssey if you had a maxed out Yakima 4-bike rack and a couple of really big people sitting on the rear bench.

OF
 

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I have no idea how this myth has gained so much traction over the last few years.
Manufacturers trying to justify their sealed-for-life transmissions. ;)
 
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