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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I searched, and maybe I just don't know how to do that very well, so I am sorry if this is answered somewhere else.....

We have a 2006 and it has almost 105K on it. We were told it needed a major tune up to include the spark plugs. Are they hard to get to? How do you change them? And is there anything else in particular? We have changed the air and cabin filters regularly, oil change regularly, and drained and refilled the ATF every 24,000 miles. Thanks in advance for any help.
 

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Try searching on words like "spark plug replacement" and "timing belt replacement" in the 2005-2010 Odyssey threads for more info.

Also, your owner's manual will have the recommended service items for the 105K interval.
 

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Just did them today on my 05 - pretty trivial - access isn't that bad (make sure you have the right length extensions (or can cobble something together) - the plugs are way down in there!)

At 105k you have all sorts of stuff to do - timing belt, idler, adjuster, water pump, serpentine belt, and coolant.
 

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What Dr. D said +1

The plugs are the least of your efforts on the major service. Make sure you have the gonads for the timing belt job (and tools) before attempting. I have not needed to do this yet, but have read about it and the harmonic balancer bolt is on pretty tight for one thing...but if you are detail oriented and like this stuff, dig into it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks all for your replies. I used the search query New Dad suggested and came across a write up another fellow did. As far as the timing belt service, etc. I forgot to mention that. It is done. I didn't do it because I did not have the time to set aside to do that myself. The plugs I figured were relatively easy, but being new to Hondas, was trying to see if there were any special tips/tricks out there. Thank-you again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes sir. That's the one I found after posting this. Thank-you!
 

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I just changed the spark plugs on my 2006 Honda odyssey ex. I bought the plugs(ngk laser premium 1zf5k11 original oem) at auto zone for about $90.00. The plugs were about 13.50 each. I had trouble getting the electrical connectors off the real coil. I removed the hex nut and pulled the coil up a little bit so I could get to them. Had to work at it to get them off. I used a screw driver to push the release button in and a putty knife to pry them off. Another tip is buy yourself some hex sockets to get the little bolt off instead of trying to use a Allen wrench's, also 1/2 inch sockets work a lot better than 3/8inch. Had no problem getting the spark plugs out. Make sure you use anti-seize on the plugs for the next time you change them.
 

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JCsHonda,

That is one thing I disagree with NGK. It sounds good on paper (i.e. do not use antiseize) but in reality antiseize does help at the next removal.
I discussed this issue of antiseize in detail in the DIY link above (thread #6 above).
Personally, I use antiseize and torque it to the same torque, zero issues whatsoever.
 

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I posted it mainly because of what NGK says in the write up about how the use of anti-seize can cause people to over tighten the plug. (I agree that this is most likely in extreme cases, as you pointed out in your post mentioning torque values of 100lbs/ft.) My guess is that NGK got tired of people saying that their plugs break frequently and decided to give an official response. Can't say that I blame them.

Since lot's of folks on here are not always as experienced, let alone own a torque wrench, a broken plug could conceivably happen. Compressing the washer on a spark plug, while seeming simple, is much easier with years of experience. So, kind of a heads up for newbie anti-seize users/spark plug installers.

Personally, I agree with the use of anti-seize. I've used it on lot's of things over the years and a bottle of it is always available when I'm working on a vehicle or piece of equipment of any kind. It's absolutely essential on rotor screws and around the hubs when using steel wheels. The trick for people to remember is to use it conservatively, a little bit goes a long way.
 
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