Honda Odyssey Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is on our '04 Ody w/76k (no history of trans issues),

I've found other grinding sound-related postings, but an admittedly-risky diagnostic test I tried has me in doubt.

The grinding sound is definitey speed-dependent, with longer pulses (that are most obvious) at slow speeds.

I jacked up each of the 4 corners, spun each tire and did not hear the noise, leading me to think the rotors are not the issue.

I then lifted the front on jack stands with both wheels off the ground. With the wheels already turning pretty fast at idle (surprising, I thought) I slowly accelerated - still no grinding noise.

My thought is taking the weight off the front tires points to something, but I've hit the limit of my diagnostic skills.

Any ideas of test suggestions?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
I'm not able to give you any solid help without more details, but it could still be rotor/pad related. Just because you spun the wheels doesn't mean they are fine.

I'd see if you can get someone to drive next to you and listen to the sound. Sometimes they can pinpoint the noise better than you can from inside your car.

And it is grinding and pulsing you say? One way to help eliminate the braking system is to lightly press the brake pedal at a slow speed and see if the noise goes away. Then try a hard press and see what happens.

Next, make sure it isn't more of a clicking noise, like a bad cv joint. Does the sound seem to be louder or softer when turning? What other things effect the noise besides speed?

What I'm getting at, is that more details could help us help you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
It is quite possible the noise is coming from one of the tires. Our Mustang is making some awful tire noise similar to what you are describing from the two front tires but we're milking a few more miles out of them before replacing before winter.

Following this similar thread may help:

http://www.odyclub.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=47217
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,163 Posts
Jack the front up again and this time pull the wheels and get in and look at the rotors and brake linings. Also look for loose rust wedged in between shields etc. These type of problems require a close inspection and check of all components not standing back and trying to guess what is wrong. I would expect wheel bearings to give off a wine more than a grinding sound. If they are giving a grinding sound you should be able to feel it by slowly turning it by hand.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,606 Posts
When our front wheel bearing (right) failed it was isolated by jacking up the front with both wheel off the ground, engine on in gear spinning about 20 mph, you could feel significant vibration on the right side vs. the left with was perfectly smooth.

Isolating the rear was much easier jacking up each side and free spinning by hand and the same vibration could be felt. At no time was there any increase in noise levels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
My wife more specifically says that the grinding/scraping sound happens when the Ody is moving between 0 - 20 mph, and when in reverse.

They start as about ½-second pulses that get shorter/quicker as speed increases, and are gone once past about 20 mph.

I've dealt with failed cv-joints before, and know the "dreaded clicking when turning" sound. Not the case here, and a quick inspection underneath shows no boot tears, leaks or other damage.

As for bearings, I would expect the noise to continue regardless of speed.

I also checked the trans fluid - level was fine and no burnt smell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Sounds very much like brakes to me. In fact, we had the same symptoms a month or two ago just before I replaced the brakes. Rears were the culprit(at 95K, metal on metal), and I did the fronts at the same time because the pads were getting too thin.

Sometimes when isolating a noise, I find it useful to find a large flat building to drive next to for a while. The sounds reflect really well back to the car. All the better if your wife can drive while you sit with your head at the passenger window(note, depending on how much you trust your wife, you could even put your head out of the window....)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I like the sound reflecting idea, and the drive-along, and will try them.

Walking alongside didn't work too well (-:

About the brake pads - failed to mention that I changed the fronts about 8 months ago. Rears had plenty of pad left.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Almost three weeks later and we found the problem - it was the tires!

I swapped the rears to the front yesterday, and the sound seemed to shift. By now, though, it had gotten so loud that it was hard to tell where it was coming from.

The tires were Uniroyal Tigerpaws, bought 2 years ago, with about 33k miles on them (one was a replacement, and 10k newer). They were not out-of-round, and didn't show any obvious signs of abnormal wear, with alignments done every 6 mos.

We decided they looked worn enough that they should be replaced regardless of whether they could be the problem, and replaced them with Goodyear Viva 2s, bought at Walmart for $75 each (don't think I've ever seen GYs that cheap, BW!).

I fully expected to hear the rubbing/grinding noise again, and am still shocked that it was completely gone. I tell you all the noise we were hearing was not rubber straining against the street.

Disks and pads, BTW still look good - though I completely stripped the two philips head bolts that hold the disks on attempting to get them off for a better view. Any ideas on getting them off?

Thanks for all the advice - I thought I'd share the results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
To remove those philips screws on the discs, an impact screwdriver is really helpful. It won't help at all now that they are stripped.

To get them out now,use a drill bit very silightly larger than the shaft of the screw, and drill the head off. The thing that's sticking the bit is actually the head, not the threads. I did this very successfully on one or two screws, and could remove the remainder of the screw with only my fingers(once the disc was off). Since your immediate problem is solved, I'd just leave them on, and be prepared to drill during the next brake job.

Always anti-sieze the screws you're having problems with, and if you can, at the first tire rotation of a new Odyssey, these screws should be removed and anti-siezed, as a preventative action.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The impact screwdriver was the last option, and unfortunately what did the stripping (-:

Great tip on using the drill bit - I'll do just that...the next time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
I second Nussbaum on the screws aren't necessary to hold the rotors. What I have done with succes when I have stripped out a philips head screw; is to take a slighlty bigger flathead screw driver and hamer it into one of the cross sections of the philips head. Has worked for me everytime. I would leave them alone for now since you have no reason to take them off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Have an 07 Oddyssey with a grinding noise very noticeable when driving around 50 mph. Let off the gas and then slightly press the accelerator, grinding noise every time. Vehicle is still under warranty, but Honda says that this is not a common problem, and cannot diagnose the noise. Told me that the noise has been documented and to just keep driving it until it becomes louder or a real problem develops.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
I'd be surprised if it wasn't one of your wheels bent. I had a bent wheel a few years ago that made a specific sound on one of the tires. It was inside the rim so you couldn't see it till you had it in the air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Bumping this thread after 15 months because the noise is back - quietly at first, but now louder than ever (but still only to about 20 mph).

I'm going to remove the front wheels tomorrow and look around. As loud as it is, there must be some observable damage.

We'll see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Well,

Suspecting a warped passenger side rotor this time, I swapped them both out and replaced the pads as well (superdad was right, BTW: the retaining bolts turned by hand after drilling the heads off). No dice - the same grinding/friction sound.

I then put on the temp spare and the noise was gone! This isolated the completely normal-looking wheel/tire as the issue.

Then it hit me: I scrubbed down the whole tire, reinstalled it and tested again - the noise was gone again!

Pass the doofus award because - after a set of tires, and a front brake redo - I think I found the culprit: Hot Shine High Gloss Tire Coating, specifically overspray thereof on the tire treads. (In fact, the noise came back a little bit after a couple of miles, or in about the time it took for the tire to dry off). I suppose there's still a chance the tire's the issue, but like the last time, there's nothing visibly wrong with it.

While a bit comedic, the effort wasn't a waste, as at 103k the rotors were never turned and that work needed to be done.

Assuming this result holds up, I need suggestions about how to remove all the buildup in the rubber of the treads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Just a thought. My 90 4 runner with some AT tires would start to growl after 8K miles or so. Id rotate them front to rear, rear to front keeping left side on left, right side on right. The noise would go away untill time to rotate again (8K miles). Seems the tread would wear in such a way as to cause the growl.

Just a thought.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top