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Time to swap out the axles with the Autozone Duralasts like I do... if they go bad you can keep swapping them out Since they got lifetime warranty
Personally, I'd prefer to pay a bit more and install a new one and be done with it for another 200K miles. We're fortunate that axles for these vans are less than $300. On Toyotas and Nissans they are $500+.
 

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If I'm not mistaken, he said in post #186 that he ran it on the lift with and without the wheels on and had the vibration in both scenarios.
 

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Time to swap out the axles with the Autozone Duralasts like I do... if they go bad you can keep swapping them out Since they got lifetime warranty
This post made me chuckle. I assume you are pulling our leg. Lifetime warranties are such a farce. Genuine Honda OEM axles are not that expensive and are the only good solution. Never install aftermarket axles; especially the AutoZone junk.
 

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I just posted in another thread somewhere about a simple oil pressure switch (not even a pressure sensor, just a switch for an idiot light) I installed on a PT Cruiser a few weeks ago. It came back on Saturday and I found it leaking through the case into the connector. I bought it at Autozone--lifetime warranty. What do I do? Do I go back to AZ and get another one and send the customer on his way again? Nope. I eat the cost and go to the dealer and get one that I can trust. If you don't mind changing parts all the time go with aftermarket. If you want to do the job once, get the dealer (or dealer quality) part.
 

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I could easily be a outlier case, but at this point, my Ody is running on 2 aftermarket axles. The driver's side was replaced about 6 years ago with an axle from Napa, still works great, the passenger side was replaced a few weeks ago. Both quality axles, and they haven't given me any issues.
 
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My 98 Nissan has a replacement axle from Napa from about that amount of time ago. The back story is it took three different axles to get one that worked and lasted. Today, things are even worse when it comes to quality and fitment.
 

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This post made me chuckle. I assume you are pulling our leg. Lifetime warranties are such a farce. Genuine Honda OEM axles are not that expensive and are the only good solution. Never install aftermarket axles; especially the AutoZone junk.
But I am serious :)
 

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I could easily be a outlier case, but at this point, my Ody is running on 2 aftermarket axles. The driver's side was replaced about 6 years ago with an axle from Napa, still works great, the passenger side was replaced a few weeks ago. Both quality axles, and they haven't given me any issues.
Normally, I like to use OEM parts, especially for things like the timing belt/water pump/thermostat or any other part of the cooling system, but I'm not sure how great OEM Honda axles are, given mine were vibrating like crazy by 82K, especially with the OEM price premium. Mine are also aftermarket. I guess I'll see in a few years time if they hold up.
 

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Normally, I like to use OEM parts, especially for things like the timing belt/water pump/thermostat or any other part of the cooling system, but I'm not sure how great OEM Honda axles are, given mine were vibrating like crazy by 82K, especially with the OEM price premium. Mine are also aftermarket. I guess I'll see in a few years time if they hold up.
Yeah. My left side axle was replaced at around 65k or so, right axle at 92k. I don't believe they were ever vibrating, just leaking.
 

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Here’s a video with the wheels on
It's hard to tell in the video, but is it correct that the axles don't appear to be vibrating at all?
If that's the case, the problem has to be down stream of the axle, narrowing it down to wheel bearing, warped wheel, or tire. Since you've already replaced the tires and you've swapped wheels around, I'm still thinking wheel bearing.

You could try measuring wheel roundness with a dial indicator just to be sure.
 

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This whole thread is going in circles. The videos aren't really helpful in any way that I can see. He already said the vibration is there even with the wheels off so that leaves very little it can be.
 

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Discussion Starter #213
It's hard to tell in the video, but is it correct that the axles don't appear to be vibrating at all?
If that's the case, the problem has to be down stream of the axle, narrowing it down to wheel bearing, warped wheel, or tire. Since you've already replaced the tires and you've swapped wheels around, I'm still thinking wheel bearing.

You could try measuring wheel roundness with a dial indicator just to be sure.
I noticed the runout in the wheels, thought maybe the tires are oblong. Then removed the wheels and vibration was still there. The axles are moving up and down, hard to tell in the video.
 

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Discussion Starter #214
Normally, I like to use OEM parts, especially for things like the timing belt/water pump/thermostat or any other part of the cooling system, but I'm not sure how great OEM Honda axles are, given mine were vibrating like crazy by 82K, especially with the OEM price premium. Mine are also aftermarket. I guess I'll see in a few years time if they hold up.
That's the thing...OEM axles don't seem to hold up any better. Same problem on my 2017, axles blew at less than 50k miles.
 

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I think I have said this before, if you use aftermarket axles, don't turn in your old axles until you're sure your new axles correctly match up to the old ones. I learned this the very, very hard way.

Also, I have modified a mechanics ear stethoscope to act like a directional microphone. All you have to do is replace the 'metal stinger' of the stethoscope with a long piece of plastic tubing. In your case, you'll need a very long piece of extension hose, maybe externally stiffened so it doesn't flop, and a large life insurance policy.

The part that is vibrating will be 'noisy', and your directional microphone should give you some idea of its source.
 

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Wiggle CV joint up and down. Observe if it’s moving the splined shaft entering the transaxle or the joint itself. Report the findings.
 
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