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Select the US Climate Zone you are from and response to Transmission Failure or not.

  • Zone 1 - Failure

    Votes: 10 7.6%
  • Zone 1 - No Failure

    Votes: 10 7.6%
  • Zone 2 - Failure

    Votes: 9 6.8%
  • Zone 2 - No Failure

    Votes: 23 17.4%
  • Zone 3 - Failure

    Votes: 10 7.6%
  • Zone 3 - No Failure

    Votes: 13 9.8%
  • Zone 4 - Failure

    Votes: 14 10.6%
  • Zone 4 - No Failure

    Votes: 20 15.2%
  • Zone 5 - Failure

    Votes: 11 8.3%
  • Zone 5 - No Failure

    Votes: 12 9.1%

  • Total voters
    132
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I did not see a survey poll on transmission failures by US Climate zone. I was giving some thought about the transmission failures and whether the climate zone or temperature had an influence on the failures. For example, I'm from NJ and have 184k miles on my original trans, which I shamefully admit I replaced the trans fluid once at 160k with 3 qts of Honda Transmission Fluid.

I have attached a picture of the United States that outline each states temperature zone. Please review the map and then select the poll answer. For those of you from another country find the climate zone that corresponds to your area and select the appropriate response. You may need to click on the link to display the map of the U.S.

Hopefully everything goes okay when I submit this post.

 

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184k :) nice. Nice to see this chart too. If only it wasnt the failure problems that brought them to this forum. It might be more accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hopefully we do have others that are here for other reasons than the trans failures. So far, based on the responses the poll most are still on their original transmission.
 

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I'm glad that this topic was finally put in a poll. I've been wondering this myself. The other finer tuning that I would add to this is whether or not the van is garaged. I also live in NJ. We garage our Van. The garage is not heated - but our 30 yr old house leaks enough heat into the garage, that even on the coldest 5 degree night - it still remains above freezing in the Garage (I store our bottled water in there, haven't seen one bottle turn to ice yet, I also bring my temperature sensitive semi tropical plants in there for the winter - not one has died in 9 years). The reason I ask - is that most of our trips originate from the Garage. If we go grocery, mall shopping or car pool (mostly), our van either started from the garage - or warmed up to operating temperature and we weren't parked long enough for it to cool down too much while at the grocery store or mall, etc. I own a 2002 - I do change the fluid more often than the recommended frequency - but the fluid has been clean + so far no issues.
 

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After massive research, I've theroized something similar. However, my theory goes more indepth, not only with the climate, but also factoring in the traffic conditions, road condtions, and terrian.

I would say that 65%-75% of the driving here in the DC Metro area is stop and go. The terrain does yield some upgrades and downgrades, but nothing extreme.
 

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my_dogs_ody said:
yes, mikey - that's why I put a smiley face after it - you knew I was kidding....maybe now would be a good time for you to re-read what we've discussed in the off-topic forum. I know you enjoy, as you stated "rattling" the cage...and that's why it'd be smart to follow the direction of the moderators.
No problem on my end.........Im good, just a kind reply in passing, thats all.:) :) :)
 

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my_dogs_ody said:
I have two theories...one is the trans components that fail (the 3rd gear pack?) were built in a different factory/subcontracted out. Kind of like the ford 351 windsor vs the 351 cleveland engines...one engine was built in a different factory, and suffered a major oil starvation issue.

My other theory is "the roll". When you stop, and shift into park, the van rolls and inch, and is stopped by the transmission....older mercedes dealt with this roll by putting in a "flex disc" in the driveline. When I stop, I put the van in neutral, fully engage the park brake, then shift it into park.

Could be neither...could be both...
Those are good theories.


"The Roll" is something Im concerned about as well. I have to try your Neutral method to see if things change. Ive noticed, if I dont warm the van up in the mornings, when I shift into reverse or drive, it will yield a rather loud clunk and the van jerks.
 

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My driveway is at about a 10%+ slope (which is where the ODY is parked). We always engage parking brake, then to neutural, then to park.
 

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herrhaus said:
My driveway is at about a 10%+ slope (which is where the ODY is parked). We always engage parking brake, then to neutural, then to park.
I'm going to start trying that one. Thanks for the insight :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
NGUSPEED said:
I'm going to start trying that one. Thanks for the insight :)
My neighbor had owned a 2001, like myself. He replaced his transmission 3 times by Honda. The forth time the transmission failed he had 145k miles on the car and desided he had enough and sold it.

A few things we discussed that were different with how we treated our cars.

1) His wife drove the van and would back out of the driveway and without coming to a complete stop shifted from reverse to drive.
2) She also had a lead foot, proceeding down the road a 40 mph with the tac at 3000 rpms, all on a cold transmission and engine.
3) Additionally, they had a steep driveway and never used the parking brake, and the car always rolled and put added pressure on the transmission with shifting being hard.

Interesting that he and I bought our vans at the same time. He had 145k miles and needed four transmission replacements, and I with 185k miles still have the original trans.

Is it luck or how we treat our vans?
 

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williamhaas said:
My neighbor had owned a 2001, like myself. He replaced his transmission 3 times by Honda. The forth time the transmission failed he had 145k miles on the car and desided he had enough and sold it.

A few things we discussed that were different with how we treated our cars.

1) His wife drove the van and would back out of the driveway and without coming to a complete stop shifted from reverse to drive.
2) She also had a lead foot, proceeding down the road a 40 mph with the tac at 3000 rpms, all on a cold transmission and engine.
3) Additionally, they had a steep driveway and never used the parking brake, and the car always rolled and put added pressure on the transmission with shifting being hard.

Interesting that he and I bought our vans at the same time. He had 145k miles and needed four transmission replacements, and I with 185k miles still have the original trans.

Is it luck or how we treat our vans?

And factor in the weight of a 2 ton van!!!
Makes beans to me.....:)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
And factor in the weight of a 2 ton van!!!

I nerver thought of it that way, the force of the van and the acceleration forward. Pretty tough on the trans.
 

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factor in the weight of a 2 ton van
Too bad the transmission was not designed and built to do the job properly. Just because it is heavy is not a valid excuse. If a skyscraper collapsed, nobody would accept the excuse, "just because building was big". I do not expect the Empire State Building to fall just because it is large.
 

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baseball said:
Too bad the transmission was not designed and built to do the job properly. Just because it is heavy is not a valid excuse. If a skyscraper collapsed, nobody would accept the excuse, "just because building was big". I do not expect the Empire State Building to fall just because it is large.
I agree, but common sense should kick in on how people drive a vehicle that is over 2 ton. I know my wife when she drives the Ody it is driven like there is a sale and everything is 100% off at every craft store in Ohio. :(
I dont drive my CRX like I drive my MH.
My point is knowing that something is that heavy...and knowing there is maybe a reason of concern...why not give it a break. Im not saying that it is all the reasons of failure. Just a after thought. and just my opinion.:)
 

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Suburban's have got to weigh more.....maybe we should find some statistics on how many Suburban/Yukon XL trannys pack it in? What about tractor trailers....they weigh more as well? Many tractor trailers get 1/2 million miles + out of a transmission.

I'm with BASEBALL, I'm not sure the weight really should be a factor.
 

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GM and Ford truck trannies are built like bank vaults. They also use a combination of sun and planetary gear sets, and the basic design has been in use for a long, long time, with many durability improvements over the many years. They're also pretty big.

If you remove the bell housing and TC on our tranny, you end up with something that is not a whole lot bigger than a high-end countertop bread cooker. Not a lot of size to transmit all that torque. I'd guess that making everything 5% larger, while adding some mass (one of the big items car designers try to keep under control), would contribute immensely to the durability of the item.

OF
 

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So when you start looking at the relative size of the clutch packs compared to the HP rating and the vehicle weight.....they just aren't up to the task.

The point is....if Honda is going to purposely design a vehicle with a defined GVW, and 250 HP engine, they should keep those factors in mind when designing the tranny, eh?
 

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Heat, weight, size....it all comes together.
Knowing that, does the maint. or the way the van is driven cause a issue. Very well could be. The subject thread/poll with the zone area that tells location of failures is a theory. Or a reason.
Just as the some fail, some dont bring a mind boggling theory all its own.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well, so far only 39 people responded thus far. The results of the poll are somewhat interesting looking at transmission failures by climate zone.

Failure percentage by climate zone
Zone 1 - 40%
Zone 2 - 33%
Zone 3 - 22%
Zone 4 - 30%
Zone 5 - 66%
Over all Failure including all 5 zones 33%

Looking at the percentages, zone three has the least percentage of failures, which by the way is the zone where I live and still on original trans w/186k mi.

It looks like there is a high failure in extreme cold or hot climates, as indicated by zone 1 and 5. What else is interesting with zone 1 and 5 is the low response, which could mean a good percentage of the vans are in the junk yard now and the failure rate is even higher than our statistics listed indicate.

Thanks to those of you that responded.
 
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