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Discussion Starter #1
When I've changed the tranny fluid on my 02 Odyssey before, I've used a topside extractor. But next time I want to drain it through the drain hole, in part to clean off the debris from the bolt and in part to use the fluid more efficiently (I can only get 1.7 quarts out at a time with the topsider method).

I'm assuming I'll be able to pry the bolt loose (though not necessarily with ease). My concern is tightening it. I'll need to tighten it by feel (since I won't have it up on a lift and I'm not sure I trust my cheap torque wrench).

Can anyone describe for me, in terms other than ft-lbs., how tight it needs to be?

Also, I noticed that the exterior of the bolt is a bit rusted. I wonder if it's a good idea to replace the bolt every once in a great while.

Thanks!
 

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Consider buying a better torque wrench. It will pay for itself with the savings in labor charges. Even though this is routine work, you are working with precision parts and so you need a good torque wrench.

Honda also recommends replacing the drain plug washer. It's a deforming type to ensure a good seal but it's not reusable, although many here do just that with no problems.

Ignore any external rust on the drain bolt. It won't get inside the transmission.

- Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
davedrivesody said:
Consider buying a better torque wrench. It will pay for itself with the savings in labor charges. Even though this is routine work, you are working with precision parts and so you need a good torque wrench.

Honda also recommends replacing the drain plug washer. It's a deforming type to ensure a good seal but it's not reusable, although many here do just that with no problems.

Ignore any external rust on the drain bolt. It won't get inside the transmission.

- Dave
All good points. It would still be helpful to have a description of how to tighten by feel. I'm sure it turns fairly easily as the washer is crushing, then meets more resistance. Once resistance is met after the washer is crushed, what portion of a rotation would I still tighten? Seems like those who have regularly done this might be able to provide some guidance.
 

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sherwoodsri,

Do you change your own oil? If so do you use a torque wrench to re-tighten the bolt? If so use the same wrench and tighten to the torque spec, IF NOT THEN THIGHTEN THE TRANSMISSION DRAIN BOLT AS YOU TIGHTEN YOUR OIL PAN DRAIN BOLT. In the end you don't want the bolt to loosen or for the bolt / washer to leak. If you have been successful with your oil pan bolt then you should be successful with your transmission drain bolt (the oil pan on the Odyssey is Aluminum, the same material as the transmission housing). Lots of luck, Russ.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
rberman999 said:
sherwoodsri,

Do you change your own oil? If so do you use a torque wrench to re-tighten the bolt? If so use the same wrench and tighten to the torque spec, IF NOT THEN THIGHTEN THE TRANSMISSION DRAIN BOLT AS YOU TIGHTEN YOUR OIL PAN DRAIN BOLT. In the end you don't want the bolt to loosen or for the bolt / washer to leak. If you have been successful with your oil pan bolt then you should be successful with your transmission drain bolt (the oil pan on the Odyssey is Aluminum, the same material as the transmission housing). Lots of luck, Russ.
I change my oil with a topside extractor...so I've never touched the drain bolt.
 

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That drain bolt is huge. As for the amount to tq I usually go roughly 25-45 degrees past resistance if it continues to leak, give it another 45 degrees.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
gregersonke said:
That drain bolt is huge. As for the amount to tq I usually go roughly 25-45 degrees past resistance if it continues to leak, give it another 45 degrees.
That's helpful...that's the kind of quantification I was looking for.
 

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I did 90 degrees after hand tightning the drain bolt. This is because the washer should get deformed/crushed to have a 100% seal.
 

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davedrivesody said:
Consider buying a better torque wrench. It will pay for itself with the savings in labor charges. Even though this is routine work, you are working with precision parts and so you need a good torque wrench....*snip*....

- Dave
You'll be glad you bought one for all of your fastening needs that specify a torque value. You'll also be amazed how far off your Mark 1 torque-sensing elbow can be compared to using a real torque wrench.

OF
 

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Harbor Freight routinely sells similar one cheaper.

HOWEVER, torque wrenches are inaccurate at their low end and should not be used for first 20% of the reading. Since this one goes from 5-80, you are good for any torque setting between say 20 through 70 ft-lb.

- Vikas
 

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varads, mine are from Utica and S-K. They're pricey. I've found that Sears makes one that looks, in all respects, like my S-K 1/2-inch drive wrench at a much, much more reasonable price. At first glance, it looks like they contracted with S-K to build it for them. The price is right, and you get that Craftsman warranty. I'd try that as one of your shopping options.

OF
 

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...unless you've got a good one. The local PMEL guy happens to be my kid's soccer coach, and the expensive wrenches (mine included) usually do well over their entire range, and stay in calibration.

However, Sears also makes a wrench nearly identical to my S-K 3/8 drive as well. For what I paid for the bigger one, you could get both from Sears, and they are great wrenches.

I'd agree, though, that if I bought a much lesser wrench I'd only use it in the middle 60% of its operating range. It just seems most purely mechanical weight or torque measuring devices are like that.

UTICA-Bonney seems to be in a class by itself. Mine is still within mfgr limits with no lock ring adjustments required for many, many years.

OF
 

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Discussion Starter #15
sontakke said:
1/2 inch should not be used for low torque settings.
I'm afraid I learned that lesson the hard way using a torque wrench for the first time to tighten the oil filter housing on my Benz. :( Snapped the bolt....had to have it towed.
 

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sherwoodsri said:
I'm afraid I learned that lesson the hard way using a torque wrench for the first time to tighten the oil filter housing on my Benz. :( Snapped the bolt....had to have it towed.
Using a torque wrench wouldn't cause this...you have to feel for the impulse when you reach the proper value. Is it possible to get distracted and miss, and cause damage, even when wrenching on something with a higher torque value (like a cylinder head nut)? You betcha.

OF
 

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0dyfamily said:
Using a torque wrench wouldn't cause this...you have to feel for the impulse when you reach the proper value. Is it possible to get distracted and miss, and cause damage, even when wrenching on something with a higher torque value (like a cylinder head nut)? You betcha.

OF
Yes, the impulse is weakest at the low end of the scale and more noticeable at the higher torque settings. Another reason to size the torque wrench to the job. I have two - 3/8 and 1/2-inch drive.
 

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sherwoodsri said:
I'm afraid I learned that lesson the hard way using a torque wrench for the first time to tighten the oil filter housing on my Benz. :( Snapped the bolt....had to have it towed.
That is why it is better to hand tighten spark plugs or drain plugs unless you are extremely sure that your torque wrench is going to click and you can hear the click. You really only need to snug them up as they are not fasteners i.e. keeping two parts bolted together. You just need it tight enough so that vibration will not loosen them.

On a vehicle, for most tasks the torque range is

1) Spark Plug tight
2) Caliper bolt tight
3) Wheel lug night tight

Most of us can differentiate those three values.

- Vikas
 

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You forget "plastic valve cover tight", i.e. NOT VERY!


(not applicable to the Ody, thankfully)
 
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