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Hey Ed!

With the shop manual and the tips found here, I could not believe how easy this was! Cost was $45 delivered for the belts from RockAuto.com and $2.50 for the dipstick o-ring from the local mower shop since Honda uses the same o-ring on their mower dipsticks and I wasn't paying the dealer $12 for it.

Took about 6.5 hrs. Book time is 7 and the techs normally do it in 5-6. Vehicle has 31k on it so all I did was change the 3 belts and inspect the tensioners, idler and water pump which were all fine. I used all Gates belts since I recall reading here that Gates is the OEM timing belt manufacturer. T286 timing belt, K040438 P/S & K060458 A/C. Original P/S belt was a Mitsuboshi, A/C hose was a Bando and I could still see the Gates logo on the original timing belt.

A few extra tips...take the entire engine mount out as one unit. That is after unbolting the P/S pump and disconnecting the hose to the reservoir (at the pump NOT the reservoir), remove the 2 bolts attached to the engine and 3 bolts attached to the body.

I spent all of 10 min trying to get a good position to use the crank tool to remove the crank bolt then just used the starter trick. Worked like a charm.

Loosen the crank bolt, rotate the crank to set the engine at TDC by looking at the marks on the front timing cover and cam (helps to have a 2nd pair of eyes up top while you are turning the crank), disassemble, mark your belts and TDC cam positions with a paint pen or white out and you're golden.

Only problem I had was the battery hold down had a burr on it that made it a bear to turn the last 1/4". Also using the front tie down hook as a lift point, my floor jack couldn't raise the vehicle high enough to get leverage with my Big Momma torque wrench so I will have to try my ramps or I'll let the dealer torque it when my new driver's seat belt comes in and they can get rid the the SRS light that just popped up. Did ya know that Honda has a lifetime warranty on seat belts?

I plan on bringing my old timing belt to the service advisor like some bounty from a jungle kill (or like a house cat that likes to bring home his latest kill be it pigeon, rat or mouse) since this new guy seemed surprised when he said, "You need a timing belt change" and I said, "Yeah I'm doing that this weekend:stupid: ."

Peace
 

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Well done, CD!

Yes, when I changed the timing belt on our 1998 Accord, this car had all of its maintenance performed by the dealer. Lo and behold, when I pulled off the timing belt cover, I found that the Honda-installed timing belt said....drum roll...Gates all over it. So did the balance shaft belt.

I think if it is made of fibre reinforced rubber, Gates probably manufactures it.

A 2002 EX with only 31,000 miles? Wow. In one of my favorite colors, too.

OF
 

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Congrats on a fulfilling project and much moola saved! You are quite DA MAN!!!

:joy:

CDChangerGuy said:
Hey Ed!

With the shop manual and the tips found here, I could not believe how easy this was! Cost was $45 delivered for the belts from RockAuto.com and $2.50 for the dipstick o-ring from the local mower shop since Honda uses the same o-ring on their mower dipsticks and I wasn't paying the dealer $12 for it.

Took about 6.5 hrs. Book time is 7 and the techs normally do it in 5-6. Vehicle has 31k on it so all I did was change the 3 belts and inspect the tensioners, idler and water pump which were all fine. I used all Gates belts since I recall reading here that Gates is the OEM timing belt manufacturer. T286 timing belt, K040438 P/S & K060458 A/C. Original P/S belt was a Mitsuboshi, A/C hose was a Bando and I could still see the Gates logo on the original timing belt.

A few extra tips...take the entire engine mount out as one unit. That is after unbolting the P/S pump and disconnecting the hose to the reservoir (at the pump NOT the reservoir), remove the 2 bolts attached to the engine and 3 bolts attached to the body.

I spent all of 10 min trying to get a good position to use the crank tool to remove the crank bolt then just used the starter trick. Worked like a charm.

Loosen the crank bolt, rotate the crank to set the engine at TDC by looking at the marks on the front timing cover and cam (helps to have a 2nd pair of eyes up top while you are turning the crank), disassemble, mark your belts and TDC cam positions with a paint pen or white out and you're golden.

Only problem I had was the battery hold down had a burr on it that made it a bear to turn the last 1/4". Also using the front tie down hook as a lift point, my floor jack couldn't raise the vehicle high enough to get leverage with my Big Momma torque wrench so I will have to try my ramps or I'll let the dealer torque it when my new driver's seat belt comes in and they can get rid the the SRS light that just popped up. Did ya know that Honda has a lifetime warranty on seat belts?

I plan on bringing my old timing belt to the service advisor like some bounty from a jungle kill (or like a house cat that likes to bring home his latest kill be it pigeon, rat or mouse) since this new guy seemed surprised when he said, "You need a timing belt change" and I said, "Yeah I'm doing that this weekend:stupid: ."

Peace
 

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Timing Belt and what else?

I'm preparing to replace the timing belt on my '98 Ody (222K miles on the original -- ouch!). I see that nearly all the timing belt kits online include replacement tensioners, but the guy at the Honda parts counter said those don't need to be replaced. Is he right?

Then again, the price at the dealer for just the timing belt and balance shaft belt is the same as the price for both belts, both tensioners AND a new water pump from an online retailer. Hmmm.
 

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Hi Jon,
yes, replace it and the cam plug as well.

Considering the milage - it's time. A pre-emptive strike.

Count your blessings that you've made it on the original. You've been on borrowed time - also, buy a lottery ticket today.

LOL
 

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I'd say if it's gone this long......try and get 444k out of the original. I'd be afraid to touch ANYTHING....you might jostle something.
 

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I was messing with you - hey, for future reference - if you could post back with what you end up getting and your experience with changing the TB/Water pump - I would be greatful.

Thanks so much and good luck!
 

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It looks like you know what you were doing and did a great job. Did you by any chance took pictures of this wonderful DIY?

CDChangerGuy said:
Hey Ed!

With the shop manual and the tips found here, I could not believe how easy this was! Cost was $45 delivered for the belts from RockAuto.com and $2.50 for the dipstick o-ring from the local mower shop since Honda uses the same o-ring on their mower dipsticks and I wasn't paying the dealer $12 for it.

Took about 6.5 hrs. Book time is 7 and the techs normally do it in 5-6. Vehicle has 31k on it so all I did was change the 3 belts and inspect the tensioners, idler and water pump which were all fine. I used all Gates belts since I recall reading here that Gates is the OEM timing belt manufacturer. T286 timing belt, K040438 P/S & K060458 A/C. Original P/S belt was a Mitsuboshi, A/C hose was a Bando and I could still see the Gates logo on the original timing belt.

A few extra tips...take the entire engine mount out as one unit. That is after unbolting the P/S pump and disconnecting the hose to the reservoir (at the pump NOT the reservoir), remove the 2 bolts attached to the engine and 3 bolts attached to the body.

I spent all of 10 min trying to get a good position to use the crank tool to remove the crank bolt then just used the starter trick. Worked like a charm.

Loosen the crank bolt, rotate the crank to set the engine at TDC by looking at the marks on the front timing cover and cam (helps to have a 2nd pair of eyes up top while you are turning the crank), disassemble, mark your belts and TDC cam positions with a paint pen or white out and you're golden.

Only problem I had was the battery hold down had a burr on it that made it a bear to turn the last 1/4". Also using the front tie down hook as a lift point, my floor jack couldn't raise the vehicle high enough to get leverage with my Big Momma torque wrench so I will have to try my ramps or I'll let the dealer torque it when my new driver's seat belt comes in and they can get rid the the SRS light that just popped up. Did ya know that Honda has a lifetime warranty on seat belts?

I plan on bringing my old timing belt to the service advisor like some bounty from a jungle kill (or like a house cat that likes to bring home his latest kill be it pigeon, rat or mouse) since this new guy seemed surprised when he said, "You need a timing belt change" and I said, "Yeah I'm doing that this weekend:stupid: ."

Peace
 

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I started the job at about noon yesterday and I'm still trying to get the crank pulley bolt loose. My neighbor's big honkin' electric impact wrench won't budge it and I haven't figured out how to get a superlong breaker bar on it. Soaking it with PB Blaster while I consider next steps.
 

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Big honkin electric impact wrench? :) With luck, that'll get you 250 lbs/ft.

I've put a 575lbs/ft air impact wrench on ours to no effect. Eventually got it with a giant extension to an extended handle, I think it was probably around 700 lbs/ft.

Basically , lift one side of the car with a jack or low jackstand or pile of wood blocks. Get the passenger side front wheel off. Install the pulley holder and its extension handle(not a ratchet) pointed backward, either against another hefty component(frame) or down to the ground to the rear so it can't move.

Get about 2 feet of half inch socket extension rods, and insert the extension into the socket that's trying to drive the crank bolt. PUT A JACKSTAND UNDER THE OUTER END OF THE EXTENSIONS, where you are about to attach the socket handle. Note that you should NOT use a ratchet handle for this part either, since it is unlikely to take the load. I've actually damaged a handle in this type of operation, so be very careful. See if you can get the handle set up so its pretty much horizontal or slightly above horizontal, handle toward the back. You'll likely cause a temporary bend of 30 degrees in the shafts involved, before it breaks free.

Put all your weight, the weight of your wife and neighbors wife on that handle. If it doesn't break free or break the handle, add a two foot pipe(cheater bar) to the handle and repeat. There's pretty much no chance you'll break the bolt. It isn't even the bolt that's sticking. Its the washer that's welded itself to the pulley. You may very well break the handles connection to the square drive. If I recall correctly I had a really awesome autozone drive handle that was nearly indestructible.

As a viable alternative, use the starter trick. Its harder on the bearings, but its probably okay. Takes 5 seconds, and no special extensions.
 

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Yup, the method described by SuperDad works. To help prevent breaking the tools, I've used a 3/4" drive 19mm 6pt socket, 3/4" extensions, and 3/4"breaker bar. And a 4' pipe (3/4" size) for the cheater bar. The 3/4" socket set is relatively low priced at Harbor Freight.

This method makes removing the crank bolt a non-issue, based on my experience changing the timing belt on 4 Hondas.
 

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24" breaker bar with a 2' iron pipe extension handle did the trick. It broke free so suddenly that I went flying. I was sure one of the breaker bars had snapped.

Onward!
 

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I finally got the timing belt on and everything seems to be lined up.

Now I'm having trouble locating the timing mark that the front balance belt pulley is supposed to line up with. Also, I assume the timing mark on the *rear* balancer belt pulley is supposed to line up to something, but the manual doesn't say what. Any advice?
 

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One other thing: is there supposed to be some sort of gasket between the timing cover and the engine block? When I removed the lower cover I saw what appeared to be silicone sealer on the block surface. Am I supposed to put some in the channel before I reinstall the lower cover? If so, how the !#$)& do I keep it from getting smeared off while I'm jockeying the cover into place?

Or is this something that's only done at the factory?
 
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