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Discussion Starter #21
Regarding the crank sensor, when is the crankshaft position re-learning procedure required when replacing the timing belt? I've read this requires a high-end (expensive) scan tool.
 

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It technically is but I rarely do it. You can do it with the Foxwell NT510 or NT520 scan tools which are not that expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
It technically is but I rarely do it. You can do it with the Foxwell NT510 or NT520 scan tools which are not that expensive.
Awesome! Maybe I'll pick one of these up. Amazon has them for $179. Not bad at all. Thanks for sharing all your great wisdom! :D
 

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You probably already know this, but... Majestic Honda in Rhode Island sells all Honda parts for about 60% of the normal dealer prices and ships all over the country. I have bought over $7,000 in parts from them (that would have cost me close to $12,000 had I bought them from my local dealer in Tulsa). Service is great. The website is a little funky to navigate and find what you want, but you can call the parts desk and the guys are very, very helpful and friendly.
 

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I'm considering changing the timing belt myself on our 2014 Honda Odyssey. I've never changed a timing belt before, but I've done several DIY car repairs - brake pads, rotors, struts, control arms, serpentine belt, etc. I've watched several youtube videos and it seems very straight forward. Do you think I'm okay attempting this job myself? My mechanic charges $1085, but the parts only cost $170. Seems very compelling to save money and do this job myself. Am I biting off more than I can chew? Should I leave this job to a professional?
 

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I know that with my 08 Odyssey you it’s recommended to replace the water pump at the same time. As after you remove it and put the old one back they tend to leak. Check this before doing it. I will have to replace mine soon because I wasn’t told this by the service at the dealership I went to. Sadly
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I know that with my 08 Odyssey you it’s recommended to replace the water pump at the same time. As after you remove it and put the old one back they tend to leak. Check this before doing it. I will have to replace mine soon because I wasn’t told this by the service at the dealership I went to. Sadly
Yes, absolutely! The water pump, idler pulley, tensioner pulley, and hydrolic tensioner should all be replaced when the timing belt is replaced. Most timing belt kits include all these parts such as the Aisin TKN-002 timing belt kit below:

https://www.amazon.com/Aisin-TKH-002-Engine-Timing-Water/dp/B008EEYTRE/
 

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I'm considering changing the timing belt myself on our 2014 Honda Odyssey. I've never changed a timing belt before, but I've done several DIY car repairs - brake pads, rotors, struts, control arms, serpentine belt, etc. I've watched several youtube videos and it seems very straight forward. Do you think I'm okay attempting this job myself? My mechanic charges $1085, but the parts only cost $170. Seems very compelling to save money and do this job myself. Am I biting off more than I can chew? Should I leave this job to a professional?
 

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I have done 4 or 5 accords and civics. My son had used an excellent professional mechanic who did side jobs on weekends. Because of the double variable cam arrangement and my desire to change all seals exposed, I hired him to do that plus some other major maintenance that needed to be done. He only charged me $300 and was very efficient and easy to work with. We both had to work together to get the new serpentine belt on and I found later that there is a trick in putting the belt last over the lipless idler roller. I have a 2005 Odyssey. I helped him every step of the way. A couple of tips: I bought the special Honda socket that uses a 1/2” ratchet and he tied it to a part of the underbody and used the starter to break the crank shaft bolt loose. You also want to change the serpentine belt unless you have just had that done. It’s possible that your serpentine belt tensioner May need to be replaced. You also want to change the timing belt tensioner for sure. There is an OEM kit you can get from Rock Auto. It is critical that you have the cams and crank in perfect position in relation to each other when you install the timing belt or you will destroy valves and pistons and trash the engine. I had a fully cracked top left engine mount that needed to be replaced. It as to be taken apart in the timing belt install so check it for damage before you buy your parts. My Honda dealer offers great specials on oil changes which make economic sense and often offer a multi point inspection on the car. They found the worn out serpentine belt tensioner so I replaced it when I did the timing belt. Every time I do the oil change thing they tend to overdiagnose thing that need to be done and give me an estimate of over $2,000. They were going to charge me $1,200 for an engine mount replacement and I tjink $350 to change the belt tensioner. Tensioner was about $80 OEM from Rock Auto and I found an OEM $800 active rear engine mount for less than $200. My parts buddy at Honda verified that I had the exact same Honda OEM Mount. I am not sure I would tackle this timing belt if you have never done a timing belt before. My son destroyed his accord engine and had to buy one of those early retired Honda engines from Japan. The cam rotates twice for every rotation of the crank so you have to get your head around that fact and be on I believe on the compression stroke for #1 cylinder with the marks properly aligned. I tried to get my son to understand that fact but he got it wrong and didn’t rotate the engine by hand (Rachel on the crank to find interference). He hit the starter and heard a bang as an open valve punched through a piston.
 

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I'm considering changing the timing belt myself on our 2014 Honda Odyssey. I've never changed a timing belt before, but I've done several DIY car repairs - brake pads, rotors, struts, control arms, serpentine belt, etc. I've watched several youtube videos and it seems very straight forward. Do you think I'm okay attempting this job myself? My mechanic charges $1085, but the parts only cost $170. Seems very compelling to save money and do this job myself. Am I biting off more than I can chew? Should I leave this job to a professional?
 

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As a mechanic, I’ve had to redo timing belts that have gone awry. It’s not so simple and I’d urge you to reconsider. Unless you have someone experienced to help you along, it’s not something you should just YouTube.
 

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I didn't think they were using timing belts anymore. My 2007 Avalon has a timing chain. Why would my 2012 Odyssey have one?

All v6 Honda’s have timing belts.
 

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The biggest mistakes are not lining up the cams and crank properly, or moving the crank when the belt is off. Don't ever move the crank when the belt is off. If a camshaft happens to move on you while the belt is off, don't turn it all the way around, just move it back where it was.

The best tip I can give is to mark the old belt and sprockets. Then transfer those marks to the new belt and put the belt on in the same exact locations on the sprockets. There's virtually no way to screw it up when you do it this way.

Another tip is in removing the old hydraulic timing belt tensioner. Remove the lower bolt completely. Then loosen the upper bolt. The tensioner will then pivot on the upper bolt under the pressure. If you loosen them both at the same time you will have pressure on both bolts and you can damage the threads in the block when removing.

Lastly, when putting the belt back on, line up your marks on the belt with the marks on the sprockets. Then put the idler pulley on loosely. Then put the tensioner pulley and tensioner on but don't pull the tensioner pin. Tighten the idler pulley down which should make that side of the belt tight. Then tighten your tensioner pulley and pull the tensioner pin.
I have done timing belt and water pumps on this motor 5 times. Odysses and MDXs. Marking the belt and transferring the marks has saved me second guessing things. My suggestion is to find a second set of hands. Get someone to help work from the top of the motor while you work from the bottom or vise versa. You will save so much time and frustration from having to get up and down while you are working. Make sure you have all of the torque specs and take good notes on steps from videos. Once you get this one under your belt, you’ll be ready to do more TB work in the future. I normally do spark plugs, PCV valve, as well as the other parts people have recommended.
 

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Timing belts on Honda's are not that hard to do, I've changed a few on civics and on my odysseys.
There are a few U-tube videos that give tips on how to do this. Main pointer I remember is just keeping the timing in place as you remove and replace the timing belt. I take lots of pictures of things so I can remember later.
I always change the water pump while I'm in there. It's just a few more bolts and it's done.
I also put on a new serpentine belt and toss the old one in my emergency repair items for roadside repairs. Never heeded one, just peace of mind knowing I have a spare when I'm on a road trip.
 

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I also try to do as much maintenance on my van as I can. However, with this being a big job and a once-in-a-ten-year task, I decided to leave it to a professional when it came due this last year. I opted to use an independent shop that has done a LOT of Hondas, and only use OEM Honda parts for the job. I'm assuming there are a number of shops around like this. I ended up changing my own spark plugs, which saved about $100 off the cost.
 

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I'm considering changing the timing belt myself on our 2014 Honda Odyssey. I've never changed a timing belt before, but I've done several DIY car repairs - brake pads, rotors, struts, control arms, serpentine belt, etc. I've watched several youtube videos and it seems very straight forward. Do you think I'm okay attempting this job myself? My mechanic charges $1085, but the parts only cost $170. Seems very compelling to save money and do this job myself. Am I biting off more than I can chew? Should I leave this job to a professional?
A good impact gun with the specialty socket makes quick work of that bolt. Hit it with penetrant several times in as many days to help. As for the belt do the paint pen marker thingy making sure to get the marks exactly on the tooth of the belt and sprockets and you cannot screw that up. When I did mine I had the 37 page write up printed in hand and followed step by step. It helps to have all the right tools. You dont just need sockets for instance you need a 1" extension and 2 4" extensions to go with. You need a short breaker bar to hold the rear cam in place and move it back and forth a few degrees as you slip the belt on. A ratchet is near impossible.
I used air tools to do mine. They are a good investment. Harbor freight makes an impacting air ratchet that zips the cam covers off like butter.
Just follow the writeup and get ready for a whole weekend but there is nothing weird or hard about the job.
 

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Thanks. Honestly, I go back and forth about this. I'm very tempted to try this job myself. The parts are so cheap and it's a very straight forward step-by-step procedure. As long as I make absolutely sure that all the timing marks on both cams and the crankshaft are perfectly lined up, I don't see how this could go wrong.

I've always enjoyed working on cars, and I think this would actually be a fun weekend project. I just have to convince myself that it's worth my time and hassle to do this myself versus paying $1000 for a professional mechanic to do the job. :D
Remember "professional mechanic" merely means he makes his living at it. Most are competant and care to do the job right. Almost as many do marginal work and to them your vehicle is just another job ticket. While its true they have the benefit of experiece the internet is a great equalizer. You can do research and find out what could go wrong before you tackle the job.
You may do a more thorough job than any professional. Then again lots of people we know shouldnt even pop the hood.
 

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I didn't think they were using timing belts anymore. My 2007 Avalon has a timing chain. Why would my 2012 Odyssey have one?
They do use timing belts. Different cars use different systems, even among the same manufacturer. Some cars combine belts and chains.
 
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