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I've not done the belt on an Odyssey. I have done belts on other cars. I can share what I have learned. First thing is to estimate how long you expect to have your car out of commission. Once you have your estimate, double it. These jobs will always take twice as long as you expect them to take. As other's have mentioned, getting the timing marks lined up when you start and making sure they don't move after that is VERY important. Don't cheap out and get good OEM type parts. Review the videos before you start. Take your time and carefully keep track of everything you take apart and you should be fine.

Personally if I was in your situation I would do it myself. First, you know what was done and if it was done right. You don't always know if your mechanic took short cuts that might cause problems later on. Second, when you factor in the time you are without the car and all the hassle of taking it to the shop and then picking it up later you are without a car just as long or longer than when you do it yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
As a mechanic, I’ve had to redo timing belts that have gone awry. It’s not so simple and I’d urge you to reconsider. Unless you have someone experienced to help you along, it’s not something you should just YouTube.
Can you please elaborate? As long as I'm absolutely sure that the timing marks on the cams and crankshaft are perfectly aligned before removing the tensioner pin, how could this job go wrong? If I use a paint pen to mark the old belt and then transfer these marks to the new belt, I should know 100% that I have the new belt exactly the same. There is the hassle of removing the power steering pump, motor mount, and timing belt covers. But, this all seems very straightforward to me. What am I missing?
 

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Discussion Starter #45
I wanted to thank everyone for all the responses and excellent suggestions and tips! There's a wealth of knowledge in this group. Overall, this seems like a very doable DIY project. With a careful approach and a few precautions, this should be a very successful repair. I don't see anything obvious that would preclude me from completing this job myself. Thanks again for all the great responses. I appreciate it! :D
 

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I'm considering changing the timing belt myself on our 2014 Honda Odyssey. I've never changed a timing belt before, but I've done several DIY car repairs - brake pads, rotors, struts, control arms, serpentine belt, etc. I've watched several youtube videos and it seems very straight forward. Do you think I'm okay attempting this job myself? My mechanic charges $1085, but the parts only cost $170. Seems very compelling to save money and do this job myself. Am I biting off more than I can chew? Should I leave this job to a professional?
I've done a lot of timing belts, and head gaskets which require timing belt removal and re-installation. I'm about to do a timing belt/water pump on a 2003 Odyssey. A job like this shouldn't take all weekend maybe 3-4 hours. As long you make double tripple sure that the timing marks are lined up, and you can get that crank case bolt off, it's a perfectly doable DYI. My only advice would be to use an actual Honda timing belt. The real deals are extremely well built (I've actually got 150+k on my mine and it still hasn't busted- fingers crossed). I've heard of off brands breaking after 50k miles. In my case, I don't plan to drive the thing for more than 50k but your van is only 5 years old, you could easily get another ten years out of it, so wouldn't risk an off brand belt if I were you. Just go slow and careful, don't get rushed, and you'll be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
I've done a lot of timing belts, and head gaskets which require timing belt removal and re-installation. I'm about to do a timing belt/water pump on a 2003 Odyssey. A job like this shouldn't take all weekend maybe 3-4 hours. As long you make double tripple sure that the timing marks are lined up, and you can get that crank case bolt off, it's a perfectly doable DYI. My only advice would be to use an actual Honda timing belt. The real deals are extremely well built (I've actually got 150+k on my mine and it still hasn't busted- fingers crossed). I've heard of off brands breaking after 50k miles. In my case, I don't plan to drive the thing for more than 50k but your van is only 5 years old, you could easily get another ten years out of it, so wouldn't risk an off brand belt if I were you. Just go slow and careful, don't get rushed, and you'll be fine.
Thanks Paul for the tips and encouragement. I was planning to use Aisin TKN-002 timing belt kit which includes a Mitsuboshi timing belt which is supposedly OEM. Do you think this is okay? I'm sure that Honda doesn't make their own timing belts. They probably use Gates or Mitsuboshi and stamp "HONDA" on it. :)

https://www.amazon.com/Aisin-TKH-002-Engine-Timing-Water/dp/B008EEYTRE/
 

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Discussion Starter #48
I've done a lot of timing belts, and head gaskets which require timing belt removal and re-installation. I'm about to do a timing belt/water pump on a 2003 Odyssey. A job like this shouldn't take all weekend maybe 3-4 hours. As long you make double tripple sure that the timing marks are lined up, and you can get that crank case bolt off, it's a perfectly doable DYI. My only advice would be to use an actual Honda timing belt. The real deals are extremely well built (I've actually got 150+k on my mine and it still hasn't busted- fingers crossed). I've heard of off brands breaking after 50k miles. In my case, I don't plan to drive the thing for more than 50k but your van is only 5 years old, you could easily get another ten years out of it, so wouldn't risk an off brand belt if I were you. Just go slow and careful, don't get rushed, and you'll be fine.
Thanks Paul for the tips and encouragement. I was planning to use Aisin TKN-002 timing belt kit which includes a Mitsuboshi timing belt which is supposedly OEM. Do you think this is okay? I'm sure that Honda doesn't make their own timing belts. They probably use Gates or Mitsuboshi and stamp "HONDA" on it. :)

https://www.amazon.com/Aisin-TKH-002-Engine-Timing-Water/dp/B008EEYTRE/
 

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Discussion Starter #49 (Edited)

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I'd be skeptical of eBay. I bought my Aisin kit for my 2011 LX on RockAuto.com. Google to find the extra 5% off code, which tends to make it competitive or better than Amazon / eBay, while being an actual car-parts company that has reason to self-police genuine parts.

Search on this site for posts (I have some) of parts lists for this job. Good info there.
 

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I'd be skeptical of eBay. I bought my Aisin kit for my 2011 LX on RockAuto.com. Google to find the extra 5% off code, which tends to make it competitive or better than Amazon / eBay, while being an actual car-parts company that has reason to self-police genuine parts.

Search on this site for posts (I have some) of parts lists for this job. Good info there.
Rock Auto is also a sponsor of this forum and they provide us our own discount code. [LINK] I've used it before and it works like a charm.

This is one of the big ways that Rock Auto gets to measure the bang-for-the-buck they get for sponsoring Odyclub, so let's push people into using them and the code.
 

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Discussion Starter #52 (Edited)
Rock Auto is also a sponsor of this forum and they provide us our own discount code. [LINK] I've used it before and it works like a charm.

This is one of the big ways that Rock Auto gets to measure the bang-for-the-buck they get for sponsoring Odyclub, so let's push people into using them and the code.
It's unfortunate that RockAuto.com charges shipping which negates any savings from that 5% off code. Even so, their prices are very competitive so it may work out cheaper anyway. Thanks for the link to the coupon code!
 

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Great link to the code. I never knew about that and will use it from now on.

BTW, I hate paying for shipping as much as the next fella, but at the end $$ are $$ and it's the total that matters along with value of the product. Seems bad when the part price is so low, then it gets higher with shipping, but I do believe the products are more likely to be genuine.

Also, for those new to RockAuto, they are very specific and efficient (in the sense that the actual costs are low and directly passed to you) about their shipping. Clear too. So if you add a second item to your order, it will show if it ships from a different distribution center. If it does, there is likely to be zero effective benefit from putting both items on the same order, which seems odd at first. Since they often offer multiple brands for certain items, it can be cheaper to choose a more expensive part that comes from the same shipping center as the main part, since you save more on combined shipping than you pay on the higher priced item. Yes, confusing, but pay attention in the cart and you'll see they make things very clear.
 

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Can you please elaborate? As long as I'm absolutely sure that the timing marks on the cams and crankshaft are perfectly aligned before removing the tensioner pin, how could this job go wrong? If I use a paint pen to mark the old belt and then transfer these marks to the new belt, I should know 100% that I have the new belt exactly the same. There is the hassle of removing the power steering pump, motor mount, and timing belt covers. But, this all seems very straightforward to me. What am I missing?
I think the cams rotate twice for every rotation of the crank, so if by chance the cams move a lot, you will never know how to realign them without getting out the shop manual and taking off a lot more parts. I'm sending mine to the shop when it's time, and I've done timing belts myself on a variety of engines. Not that I can't, but my van is under Honda care and I really don't want to jeopardize the warranty by leaving something undone which has happened before.

Sent from my SM-G960U1 using Tapatalk
 

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I think the cams rotate twice for every rotation of the crank, so if by chance the cams move a lot, you will never know how to realign them without getting out the shop manual and taking off a lot more parts. ...
The cam actually rotates one-half turn for every rotation of the crank.

Regardless, several have posted in anxiety when a cam suddenly spins from its correct position while the belt is off. Its not a big deal for those who are used to it, but apparently very unnerving for those who are caught off guard.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #56 (Edited)
Since the values are spring-loaded, the camshaft may rotate slightly once the timing belt has been removed. But if so, it only moves about 30 degrees clockwise or counter-clockwise from TDC. The cams won't spin all the way around. You can easily take a 14mm wrench and slowly move the cams back to TDC. No damage done!

Only move the cams the shortest distance back to TDC. Never rotate the cams completely around while the timing belt is off.
 

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The cam actually rotates one-half turn for every rotation of the crank.

Regardless, several have posted in anxiety when a cam suddenly spins from its correct position while the belt is off. Its not a big deal for those who are used to it, but apparently very unnerving for those who are caught off guard.

Dave
I knew it was something like that. Thanks for clarifying. I just recently changed the timing belt on my Nissan truck and it was a super easy job to keep the cams in place. I used zip ties through the sprockets to hold the belt in place. I assume you could do something similar.

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One additional Item - if you haven't already finished your job.

Inspect and consider replacing your Front VTEC solenoid gasket and spool valve filter set. Search posts on this forum and elsewhere. If this gasket leaks, the oil drips downward onto the alternator, which can induce alternator failure. Access to the area requires much of what is already removed for the TB / WP replacement. The gasket was formerly not available from Honda separately from the spool valve, but RockAuto has them. This is not the whole solenoid, just two gaskets in that valve body.

My friend suffered this failure the same day that his dealer did a multi-point inspection and gave his 2014 ODY with 144K miles a green light. It is tricky to look for a leak there unless the mechanic is focused on just exactly that task. Our 2012 ODY is at 158K, and the area was bone dry when I checked. But next timing belt / water pump change I will replace that gasket for peace of mind. As far as I can see, if the rear bank spool valve leaks, it just makes a mess, so that one's a bit less critical.

Good luck !

Mariner4
 

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Discussion Starter #59 (Edited)
I thought I'd give an update to my original post for my first timing belt DIY replacement. I finally had free time this last weekend to tackle this job. Our 2014 Odyssey has 107k miles, so I replaced the timing belt, hydraulic tensioner, pulleys, and water pump using the Aisin kit. I also replaced the thermostat and upper/lower radiator hoses as well as the side engine mount, serpentine belt and tensioner.

I used the Lisle socket and Milwaukee 2767 impact which quickly removed the crankshaft bolt in seconds. I marked the old timing belt using a paint pen and transferred the marks to the new belt. Everything went as planned until I went to pull the grenade pin on the hydraulic tensioner. The pin bent and became jammed, and I was forced to remove the tensioner and reset it. I did this twice with the same results. I finally used a small drill bit and that worked. The wire used for the grenade pin is much too flimsy and bends very easily. In hindsight, I would start by replacing the pin with a nail or drill bit before installing the tensioner.

Overall, the job was a success. I added new coolant and fired up the engine without any issues. The total time for this job including the additional parts that I replaced was about 10 hours. I started Friday night and finished Saturday afternoon.

As my first timing belt replacement, I must say this was a very time consuming and frustrating experience. I have a new appreciation for mechanics who do this job day after day. It's hard enough doing this on your own car. I can't imagine having to do this on someone else's car.

Would I attempt this job again? I would have to say 100% emphatically NO! The lost time away from my family (my wife and kids) while I labored in the hot garage just wasn't worth it to me. I would gladly pay someone $1000+ to do this job the next time around. Just my 2 cents.
 

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After you do a few of them you can get them done in about 4 hours. On the pin, you need to pull it quickly. I haven't had one stick where I had to pull it off and reset it but they can hang a little bit.
 
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