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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings, first post from a log-time lurker. I can’t express enough gratitude to pay back everything I’ve learned from the collective wisdom of this community.

Just this weekend, in fact, I read about other members’s experiences with changing air filters, spark plugs, serpentine belt, front brake pads and rotors, flushing the brake lines, and even swapping out the power steering pump...and then went and did all those projects for myself. My 2010 EX-L @ 158k miles seems quite pleased with all the attention. :)

I’ve not yet done the timing belt service, and I assume it wasn’t done before I bought it used in 2014 @ 60k miles. It’s beyond my ability to do it in my driveway, and even if it were, I’m a slow worker and can’t risk being the shade tree mechanic who took the wife’s daily driver out of service for a week or more.

Here, then, is my question: Does this community have a handle on the frequency of timing belt failures in the field? I understand that it’s on the recommended service schedule and failure of the belt results in motor death when the pistons kiss the valves, but ... how often have failed timing belts actually killed Odysseys? I see a lot of late 3G and early 4G vans on the road, surely they haven’t all had the timing belt service....or have they?

I’ll likely sell this van just last our eight year mark, in early 2021 with around 170k on the clock. If it’s a reasonable gamble, I’d like to avoid a major service expense. But if I’m truly playing with loaded dice every time he van leaves the driveway, I’d be inclined to bite the bullet and get the timing belt serviced.

Thanks for any advice you can offer!
 

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So many variables. If you live in a moderate to cold climate I believe you get more wiggle room than say super hot like the southwest. Also, time probably impacts the belt itself more than miles alone, but the key is that every component that typically gets replaced along with the belt are capable of taking out the belt if they fail. A seized water pump? BAM the belt is toast. Same thing for an idler or tensioner pulley. If the hydraulic tensioner fails and the belt jumps time the result is the same. SO, are you feeling lucky, punk? 😂😂
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
So many variables. If you live in a moderate to cold climate I believe you get more wiggle room than say super hot like the southwest. Also, time probably impacts the belt itself more than miles alone, but the key is that every component that typically gets replaced along with the belt are capable of taking out the belt if they fail. A seized water pump? BAM the belt is toast. Same thing for an idler or tensioner pulley. If the hydraulic tensioner fails and the belt jumps time the result is the same. SO, are you feeling lucky, punk? 😂😂
You're absolutely right. In my business we try to isolate workloads into "failure domains." Tensioners and idlers are one thing, but I can't help thinking that the J35A7's dependency between the timing belt and the water pump is a poor shot in an interference engine.

So.....now that we've both spoken the liability out loud, I'd better err on the side of superstition and schedule the service.

What has the community - or yourself - seen as the cost professional timing belt service?

Thank you --
 

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Yeah everyone focuses on the belt itself, but other components factor in and rarely does an engine that jumped time get torn down to investigate the real cause. The high mileage car gets scrapped or they drop a used motor in without caring what really happened. Just had one in the other day, TB changed at 217K (2nd time) and toasted engine at 241K. Don't know if all the related components were done, but the lady that owns the car said her ex set up the service and is well versed on Honda. The sticker under the hood said Aisin, so the right parts were used assuming they did the whole kit and didn't skip anything.

Most report in the $800-$1,000 range here for the TB kit and labor. If you can find a good independent or dealer tech who likes to do side work and will let you supply the kit get the Aisin kit on rockauto.com for $180. My guy (side work) charges me $200 labor, but I always give him $250 because I think he's too cheap for his own good. For those who do them at 105K as prescribed the spark plugs are changed at the same time which will add $3-400 parts/labor which is why you will often see $1,100 - $1,500 reported for the full 105K service.
 

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I went 192K on the original TB on my 2001. Looked fine on removal. I never changed any of the other components. Van was hit and totaled at 254K.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I went 192K on the original TB on my 2001. Looked fine on removal. I never changed any of the other components. Van was hit and totaled at 254K.
When you say other components, do you mean the water pump, idlers, tensioners...?
 

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I went 192K on the original TB on my 2001. Looked fine on removal. I never changed any of the other components. Van was hit and totaled at 254K.
Yeah I get people in my shop all the time bragging about how they have skipped all the recommended service on numerous cars and got 250K+ out of them so save the speech... You can always find that dude who is 95 years old, been smoking since he was 12, drinks whiskey daily, and is still going strong. BUT on average habits like that end up like my buddy found dead 3 days shy of his 48th of a heart attack. Cigars, bourbon, and 5-10 350 lbs are the equivalent of ignoring service intervals on your car. Just because you got lucky doesn't mean everyone will. I get calls frequently in the 140-150K range with toasted motors. Just sayin...
 
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