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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I have a 2000 Honda Odyssey v6. While attempting my first timing belt replacement, I inadvertently loosened the tensioner and I believe the rear cam pulley slipped on the lose belt before I was able to mark the placement. All repair manuals state that the crank pulley and front & rear cam pulleys should be set at TDC before installing the new belt. I found that the rear cam pulley will not rest at TDC (it rests either at around 50 degrees before or after TDC). This concerns me since the instructions indicate that it should rest at TDC prior to installing the new belt. Should I rotate the rear cam to TDC as I’m attaching the belt or am I missing something in this process of setting the timing? Thanks!
 

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Yes, use a wrench (not a ratchet!) to move the pulley back into position, and have someone hold it there if possible.

I'm about to post a topic on my own TB change experiences and will have information on the tooth counts that you might be able to use to mark your new belt so can get the timing dead on.

WormGuy
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for confirming. I understand that the pulley timing markers represent top-dead-center for the #1 cylinder. It makes sense that valves for the other cylinders would be in various stages of opening/closing and would therefore press against the cam shaft causing the pulley to resist a certain spot. Given the numerous manuals, YouTube videos and posts I read regarding timing belt replacement, you would think that someone would have mentioned this.

Good suggestion to use a wrench instead of a ratchet so that the pulley push & pull can be controlled. My breaker bar with socket also works well and provides good leverage. Thanks again for your reply and look forward to your post.
 

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I found that the rear camshaft will in fact rest at TDC, but it is at a hair-trigger state there. Move it even a few degrees either way, and it'll snap to the next resting spot.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thanks, that's good news because you are confirming that there is resistance pressure on the rear camshaft pulley when rotating the timing mark to line up with TDC. This together with the tooth count guidance that Wormguy provided in his separate post (http://www.odyclub.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=102743) allows me to feel confident in aligning the timing marks properly.

I’ve marked the belt using Wormguy’s instructions. I’ve also marked the two lower crankshaft sprocket teeth that are opposite of TDC and which will align with Wormguy’s “E” position on the belt. With the tensioner off, I’ll start the belt install by placing the belt’s “E” mark on the crankshaft tooth that I marked opposite of TDC. I’ll then move clockwise around the idler pulley to the front cam (which is resting at TDC). The front camshaft pulley timing mark should align between the C/D belt marks (a paper binder clip can be used to hold the belt in place on the pulley). I’ll then use a “wrench” to rotate the rear camshaft pulley to TDC and hold it there while aligning the belt’s A/B marks with TDC on the pulley and add another paper binder clip to this pulley to hold the belt in place. While continuing to hold the rear camshaft pulley stationary, I'll slip the belt around the final tensioner pulley. Hopefully with the binder clips in place, the belt will not slip while I reattach the tensioner.

I appreciate your reply.
 

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Your plan sounds good. Please let us know how it works. After locking down the idler and releasing the tensioner, rotate the crankshaft clockwise several complete turns. After an even number of rotations you can line up the crankshaft sprocket vertically and check that the two camshaft sprockets also line up. Note that after rotating the crankshaft, the white marks will no longer line up.

After putting back on the lower timing belt cover and crankshaft pulley, there is a more precise mark in the form of an arrow on the cover that points towards the center of the crankshaft pulley. On the inside rim of the pulley there are notches. The notch that is separate from the others (to the left of the others) corresponds to Top Dead Center. When you line the arrow and that mark up, the top two camshaft sprockets should be lined up precisely. Note that the rear one is hard to read from an angle - try your best to look at it straight on.

Good luck!
 

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The binder clip is a good tip for future belt changes. I marked the old belt on mine for transferal to the new belt, that adds a bunch of confidence. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The timing belt replacement is complete and the timing appears fine and my crank & cam pulley marks are confirmed to be dead on.

I do however have an idling issue to resolve. When cold, the engine runs very smooth for about 10 seconds and then begins looping while idling (idle quickly cycles between 1,500 and 2,000 rpm). My troubleshooting guide suggests that this is caused by a vacuum leak, EGR valve leak or plugged PCV valve. While working on the timing, I did disconnect the electrical connector to the EGR valve (incorrectly thinking this had something to do with the ignition). I double checked the reconnection but that does not appear to be the issue. Also no check engine light to indicate an EGR valve issue. I'll be looking at it today if anyone has any other thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Problem solved. I found lots of advice related to idling problems within this forum. Perhaps the new coolant just needed to fully run through the engine block. After the car completely warmed up and cooled off, the idle was back to normal. This should bring this thread to a close. thanks
 

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Hey, guys. This forum is great. I too have tackled my own timing belt and I don't know why I have been intimidated by it. My 2004 EXL-RES has 103,000miles on it. It's been on jack stands for a week because I took off the timing belt on sunday and while putting on the new belt, moved the rear cam pulley and then accidentally moved the front cam pulley. Oops.

Just to be clear, I can use the hard points on the engine to line up the front and rear cam pulleys and line up the crank pulley and everything should be fine as long as I don't move anything again when I put the new belt on?

I did use the marking technique so my new belt and the cam and crank pulleys have marks on them. Can I just set everything back to TDC and use the marks I made before taking off the old belt. And yes, I marked my new belt with the markings from the old belt.

Thanks in advance for your patience if this has already been answered.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yes, with the old marks properly on your belt and your pulleys aligned with TDC, that should be all you need. Only caution would be in rotating your pulleys to TDC. The cam and crank pulleys are intended to rotate as a unit (hence the timing belt). Rotating one by itself can cause piston and cylinder to collide. Don't force a pulley if it appears obstructed. If you are making just a small adjustment back to TDC there should be no problem.
 

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You probably already read this somewhere but I'll say it again....when the belt is on and under tension, spin the engine by hand to make sure everything still lines up and you have no binding. It helps to have the spark plugs out. The lines on the belt will not match back up but the factory ones should. You've already got through the hardest part so you're on the home stretch.
 

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riontegra said:
Sounds complicated. I think I'll let someone else do this. Anyone know what a dealer charges?
Good luck getting out of there for less than a grand. Occasionally the dealers will send out coupons, see if one of those will work for your van.

Look around for a good local shop and make sure they replace the seals, bearings, and water pump too.
 

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Thanks, Joe3855 and OdyinNH. I set the cams and crankshaft using the hard points on the engine. I rotated the crankshaft after I got the belt properly tensioned to check for resistance and to make sure the cams were lining up with the crankshaft. It worked. I did end up changing the automatic adjuster as a precaution and the power steering pump (it had announced it's intention to die just before I decided to change the timing belt. All told, I think I saved about a $1000.00 doing every thing myself. Safe travels to all during the holiday season.
 

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I am lost, I used a write up in here and accidentially loosened the tensioner. TDC on what cyl and is it the compression or exhaust? I am going to have to do this free hand I have no marks on the cam pullys I see the #s on the face with a dash.
I will now pull the plugs and find tdc on 1, whatever that one is using the screwdriver method.
I have done Audis belts but was not expecting the tensioner to come loose and throw me off.
Any Clear direction would be great, I know, 0 Clearance
 
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