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Discussion Starter #1
Having problems with my new tires on my 2015 Ody. Since I replaced the original tires with Hankook everytime there is a 30 degree change in outdoor temperature either way (which is often in north MO) I lose pressure. It is so frustrating to have to put air in the tires when the weather is miserable, too hot or too cold!
What can I do to stop this?
 

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The pressure decreases, regardless of the direction of the temperature swing (either towards hotter or colder)? I would assume there is a slight leak. How much of a pressure difference are you experiencing?
 

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The pressure decreases, regardless of the direction of the temperature swing (either towards hotter or colder)? I would assume there is a slight leak. How much of a pressure difference are you experiencing?
^this
I had this problem on both front tires last year. Lost a few pounds of pressure some days, others none. When I finally found time to have it serviced, one tire had a construction staple and the other had a failure along the bead.
 

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I lose 5-7 pounds in each tire every time the weather is a drastic change (30 degrees either way). All 4 tires seem to lose an equal amount and it is only with the drastic weather change. Otherwise they hold steady.
My fingers froze tonight. I'm a 68 year old female, too old to keep this up! 😉
 

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I lose 5-7 pounds in each tire every time the weather is a drastic change (30 degrees either way). All 4 tires seem to lose an equal amount and it is only with the drastic weather change. Otherwise they hold steady.
My fingers froze tonight. I'm a 68 year old female, too old to keep this up! 😉
5-7 pounds sounds about right for such a big swing in temperature. Besides the pressure drop with temperature fluctuation, are you checking the tires under the same conditions? As in, the car has not been driven (tires are cool/cold). Sorry if that is obvious - trying to pare down the variables of what could be causing the issue.

Not sure if there is a Costco near you, but if not, perhaps some tire service center has nitrogen to fill your tires. N2 does not swing wildly with temperature fluctuations as air (21% O2, 78% N2) does. Failing that, I would find a neighbor with a big heart to help keep your pressures set.
 

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Closest Discount Tire is 101 miles away! 😂
Oops, Here in Phoenix it was 70 during the day and 40 something last night. It's plays havoc on tires with uneven pressure to start with. The tire shops have lines around them for air checks.
Once you get your tires pressures equal this should go way.
 

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5-7 pounds sounds about right for such a big swing in temperature. Besides the pressure drop with temperature fluctuation, are you checking the tires under the same conditions? As in, the car has not been driven (tires are cool/cold). Sorry if that is obvious - trying to pare down the variables of what could be causing the issue.

Not sure if there is a Costco near you, but if not, perhaps some tire service center has nitrogen to fill your tires. N2 does not swing wildly with temperature fluctuations as air (21% O2, 78% N2) does. Failing that, I would find a neighbor with a big heart to help keep your pressures set.
30 degree F swings should give about 6% change (approx 30/500) in pressure. So at 40 psig (55 psia), that is only a 3 psi swing.

N2 obeys the ideal gas law just as dutifully as the other gases in air do. The difference is that air pumped in from an air compressor will typically have some moisture in it. The temperature-variable evaporation/condensation of that moisture between liquid water and gaseous water vapor is the thing that affects pressure. N2 in tires is typically dried (all H2O removed) as part of the procedure that extracts it from the air. Dry air would be just as good at resisting thermal variability.

But (as I read it) the main surpising point of the OP is that she loses pressure when temp goes down 30 degrees. And she loses pressure when temp goes up 30 degrees. And the other very weird thing is that it is the same on all 4 tires, making it less likely to be a bad valve, bead seal, puncture, etc.

So I'm really stumped on this one. Hope the info I provided above is helpful.
 

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I’d expect to see pressure changes with temperature changes. Nitrogen filled tires will do better though. Also could be bad tires or valve stems. That’s a discount brand tire right? Possible it’s a bad batch and they all leak. Sorry you’re having trouble.
 

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30 degree F swings should give about 6% change (approx 30/500) in pressure. So at 40 psig (55 psia), that is only a 3 psi swing.

N2 obeys the ideal gas law just as dutifully as the other gases in air do. The difference is that air pumped in from an air compressor will typically have some moisture in it. The temperature-variable evaporation/condensation of that moisture between liquid water and gaseous water vapor is the thing that affects pressure. N2 in tires is typically dried (all H2O removed) as part of the procedure that extracts it from the air. Dry air would be just as good at resisting thermal variability.

But (as I read it) the main surpising point of the OP is that she loses pressure when temp goes down 30 degrees. And she loses pressure when temp goes up 30 degrees. And the other very weird thing is that it is the same on all 4 tires, making it less likely to be a bad valve, bead seal, puncture, etc.

So I'm really stumped on this one. Hope the info I provided above is helpful.
You should be stumped - these posters are very confused over what is going on. When the outside temp is colder than it was when you last set the pressures, they will be lower. When the temp is higher, the pressure will be higher, assuming no leaks and only a day or so since you last checked them. You must check your tires under the same conditions, usually first thing in the morning before the sun hits them. This time of year, in the areas that have 'Fall' and 'Winter', is the worst for tire pressure because as it gets colder, you are chasing the pressure trying to keep the tires pumped. In the spring/summer, sometimes you actually have to let air out to maintain the cold air pressure.
What you are setting is the 'Minimum Cold Pressure' which must be maintained to the number on the tire pressure sticker in the driver's side door jamb. You should try to keep all four tires equal but a pound or two here and there is not that critical because you will be doing this frequently and it all balances out.
If you get a TPMS warning or detect a low tire with a gauge (more than 5 psi lower than the others), you most likely have a puncture or other leak. Do not ignore this - get it taken care of ASAP.
The best thing I have found for my use along these lines is a Black & Decker 'Air Station', a rechargeable high-flow tire pump with digital gauge.
Yes, its a PITA to check tires almost every day especially when you have multiple vehicles, but its just a fact of life when you operate motor vehicles.
 

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I had this problem on mine. I use to put it at the recommended psi but, now I've been running the psi higher and its actually been staying where it should be. I use to have to fill it up once a week because they would get down. I filled them up to 40psi and it seems to hold better and drip better also. I dont have that outer edge wear either like I had on my other set if tires running them at the recommended 34

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Discussion Starter #14
I have to admit I don't check my tire pressure unless the tire warning light comes on. That has been happening with the temperature change so that is the only information I have. I am 125 miles from the dealer but am about due for an oil change, got the tires from them just over a year ago. Will be having them check this out then I guess. Will keep everyone updated.
 

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I had this problem on mine. I use to put it at the recommended psi but, now I've been running the psi higher and its actually been staying where it should be. I use to have to fill it up once a week because they would get down. I filled them up to 40psi and it seems to hold better and drip better also. I dont have that outer edge wear either like I had on my other set if tires running them at the recommended 34

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I am running to 40 psi, but my tires are rated to handle higher than that.
 

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As noted above, a 30F change is 5-6% change in PSI. So, depending upon where you were sitting at initially, your change is ~2 psi. O2, N2, CH4 - doesn't matter what you fill your tires with as long as the air is relatively dry, they all behave the same (follow the ideal gas law). Fill your tires cold (undriven) to the target pressure and only check them cold under the similar conditions. Unless you have a leak, there should be little variation except for the usual slow leaking over months time. The myths and silliness on tire pressure are amazing.
 

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I am running to 40 psi, but my tires are rated to handle higher than that.
Same here! My tired are rated for extra load. I can definitely tell the difference when I go on trips and have the whole van full of people and all their luggage and bags. Side walls are alot stronger.

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For norms, 5-6% swing I believe (~2psi). But 5-7 psi swing = you have a problem over a 30 degree temp change.

I live in mid-Canada where we go from +35C to -35C summer to winter. I set my pressures approx. once a year at 35 psi in the shade during summer, and never adjust them otherwise unless I had a puncture. None of our 3 vehicles (all with TPMS) ever have the sensors go off in the winter with that 70 degree C temp swing (that's 126 degrees F temp swing btw). I do recall checking them once or twice over the years just to be sure and they were all still above 30 psi even in the coldest days of January.
 
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