Honda Odyssey Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently had my new Torque Converter installed by my local dealer....
(thread located here: http://www.odyclub.com/forums/52-20...converter-2008-odyssey-exl-covered-honda.html)

I was back in the dealership today to have the driver's leather front seat cover replaced (again!) due to cracking in the sidewall of the seat cover leather and also to have the power steering pump replaced.....

I decided to check the transmission fluid level real quick before I headed over to the dealership.
I checked it cold (out of curiosity) and it was about an inch over the hot mark.
I warmed the engine up and checked the level properly and it was, as expected, still way above the hot mark.

So, I had the service advisor ask the tech to inspect the fluid level.
The service advisor confirmed that it was 1.5 quarts over!!

Needless to say, I wasnt happy and told the advisor so. I asked him how can you overfill the tranny fluid when you just installed a torque convereter and were presumably adding all new fresh fluid? Obviously, he didn't have an answer.
They drained out the extra to get it down to the appropriate level.

My question is this (since I am not a mechanic):
What could have been the damage to the tranny/TC if I hadn't noticed the level was too high?
Is 1.5qts overfill a big deal...or not significant enough to be an issue?

Thankfully, I've only put a little over 500 miles on since the new TC (and fluid overfill) went in.

just curious....

thanks,
mm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
I am no mechanic but I have done most fluid changes (including transmission fluid) on my own vehicles. It would have been worse if they didn't have enough fluid. I think 1.5 qt of extra fluid in the transmission probably didn't do any damage to your vehicle. Also we are in December where the temperature is not as hot and the fluid wouldn't have expanded by a huge amount. If this was motor oil in your engine, it will churn the oil, causing aeration and eventually foam may form which is bad. I don't think the transmission has this same effect. If the car is shifting fine and smoothly in the coming months, then it should be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
Transmissions have a vent tube and will spit out extra fluid, especially if it were 1.5 qts high.

Find a different dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Transmissions have a vent tube and will spit out extra fluid, especially if it were 1.5 qts high.

Find a different dealer.
Where does the fluid go when it's spit out?

And, unfortunately, this is the only dealer that is convenient for me. So, I'm kinda stuck with them, at least for any warranty work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,836 Posts
As far as I can tell, you're okay, mr.mjm. Overfilling the A/T can cause foaming, which is bad. That said, what usually can happen with a gross case of overfilling the ATF is the following first set of circumstances:

1.) ATF starts to foam (air bubbles entrained in the ATF)
2.) Air-entrained ATF does not exchange heat or perform fluid power transmission as well as straight fluid
3.) You get slipping in the chosen gear, fluid expands
4.) Fluid spits out via the rubber vent hose at the top of the tranny case, creating an oily mess
5.) Some ATF can get on the exhaust pipe, creating a smoky mess

You had none of this happen. Once it starts foaming (say, on a drive on the freeway), all of the above can happen quickly. Often, when people on this forum have had this situation and pull over to the roadside to assess the situation, the following second set of circumstances usually happens:

1.) ATF cools down
2.) Foaming ceases (due to anti-foaming agents in the ATF additives package)
3.) ATF level is now lower due to extra ATF having been vented overboard
4.) They get back into the car, and it drives just fine

You didn't appear to have any of this happen, either, because the first set of circumstances needs to happen to arrive at the second set.

I say you're fine and got the situation corrected. Also, I agree...find another dealer.

OF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,116 Posts
A bit of overfill is fine, no big deal.
Better than low ATF fluid.

Having said that, the dealer already drained some ATF so nothing to worry about.

I have learned this a long time ago: don't expect any perfection from any dealer of any car.
Their mechanics have all kinds of skills/meticulousness, some are excellent, some ae not.

The #1 lesson is:
- Whenever you have any work performed at any dealer or indy, double check it.
- Learn some DIYs from car forums, this will make your life better: an informed customer is a better customer.
- Also learn some DIYs such as changing spark plug, routine maintenance: you will see that you will do a better job and save tons of cash!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks to everyone for putting my mind at ease regarding the tranny fluid. I'm just glad I checked it and had them remove the excess, before I had put any significant mileage on it.

And, unfortunately I'm kinda stuck with this dealership. It is the most convenient one for me.

I have an appointment with the service department shop foreman sometime in the next week. We are still trying to diagnose a vibration I'm having with my Ody. I am going to voice gently my displeasure about the tranny overfill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
As far as I can tell, you're okay, mr.mjm. Overfilling the A/T can cause foaming, which is bad. That said, what usually can happen with a gross case of overfilling the ATF is the following first set of circumstances:

1.) ATF starts to foam (air bubbles entrained in the ATF)
2.) Air-entrained ATF does not exchange heat or perform fluid power transmission as well as straight fluid
3.) You get slipping in the chosen gear, fluid expands
4.) Fluid spits out via the rubber vent hose at the top of the tranny case, creating an oily mess
5.) Some ATF can get on the exhaust pipe, creating a smoky mess

You had none of this happen. Once it starts foaming (say, on a drive on the freeway), all of the above can happen quickly. Often, when people on this forum have had this situation and pull over to the roadside to assess the situation, the following second set of circumstances usually happens:

1.) ATF cools down
2.) Foaming ceases (due to anti-foaming agents in the ATF additives package)
3.) ATF level is now lower due to extra ATF having been vented overboard
4.) They get back into the car, and it drives just fine

You didn't appear to have any of this happen, either, because the first set of circumstances needs to happen to arrive at the second set.

I say you're fine and got the situation corrected. Also, I agree...find another dealer.

OF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Hello
I’ve just had 2006 Honda Odyssey. I drove it from LA to AZ and everything run smooth but when I reach 190miles the transmission fluid spill out inside the hood and made smoke. But when it cool down every is fine and I drove it normally.
Could you tell what happened to my van is because the transmission fluid is over fill?
If it was over fill and spill out like this will it make my transmission bad?
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
As far as I can tell, you're okay, mr.mjm. Overfilling the A/T can cause foaming, which is bad. That said, what usually can happen with a gross case of overfilling the ATF is the following first set of circumstances:

1.) ATF starts to foam (air bubbles entrained in the ATF)
2.) Air-entrained ATF does not exchange heat or perform fluid power transmission as well as straight fluid
3.) You get slipping in the chosen gear, fluid expands
4.) Fluid spits out via the rubber vent hose at the top of the tranny case, creating an oily mess
5.) Some ATF can get on the exhaust pipe, creating a smoky mess

You had none of this happen. Once it starts foaming (say, on a drive on the freeway), all of the above can happen quickly. Often, when people on this forum have had this situation and pull over to the roadside to assess the situation, the following second set of circumstances usually happens:

1.) ATF cools down
2.) Foaming ceases (due to anti-foaming agents in the ATF additives package)
3.) ATF level is now lower due to extra ATF having been vented overboard
4.) They get back into the car, and it drives just fine

You didn't appear to have any of this happen, either, because the first set of circumstances needs to happen to arrive at the second set.

I say you're fine and got the situation corrected. Also, I agree...find another dealer.

OF
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top