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The manual states grade 87 gasoline is acceptable. This is my first minivan, so I wanted to get others recommendations. Does it make a big difference to use the premium levels?
 

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The manual states grade 87 gasoline is acceptable. This is my first minivan, so I wanted to get others recommendations. Does it make a big difference to use the premium levels?
Your wallet will be lighter and thus improve your MPG slightly. However, if you use a credit card to purchase the gas then no difference.
Really, it's a total waste of money.
 

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The manual states grade 87 gasoline is acceptable. This is my first minivan, so I wanted to get others recommendations. Does it make a big difference to use the premium levels?
Premium is available for vehicles that call for it. If your manual calls for 87 gasoline, then I would use that. You won't get much benefit from using higher octane fuel, unless the vehicle calls for it.
 

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The only benefit higher octane fuel delivers is less pre-detonation in a higher compression motor. Most consumer vehicles(non-performance) will run just fine on base 87 but a higher compression motor will need the highest available. ....If I dont run 93 in my SUV it sounds like I am driving a diesel it is knocking so bad and rough running as well. All that "dieseling" as its sometimes called isn't good for a motor either.
 

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Urban myth, geography-dependent, whatever... 89 sells in such low volume next to 87 and 93, that you can be certain it's been sitting the longest in all the tanks. That my 2 cents, literally.
Actually, most of the new stations don't have a 89 tank at all. When you select 89, the pump mixes 87 and 93 to create the 89 on-the-fly now. My uncle's gas stations (2 of 'em here in NC) never had the 89 tank. Only regular, premium and diesel tanks and his stations weren't even that new.
 

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Actually, most of the new stations don't have a 89 tank at all. When you select 89, the pump mixes 87 and 93 to create the 89 on-the-fly now. My uncle's gas stations (2 of 'em here in NC) never had the 89 tank. Only regular, premium and diesel tanks and his stations weren't even that new.
You are correct. 89 is usually a mixture of 87 and 93...
 

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In Colorado they traditionally have 85, 87, and 91 octane. Anyone know if 87 is a mixture of 85 and 91?
 

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In Colorado they traditionally have 85, 87, and 91 octane. Anyone know if 87 is a mixture of 85 and 91?
Yep I'd be surprised if they keep a separate 87 tank. ( 85 + 91 ) / 2 = 88 and the min octane rating has to be 87 so I am sure they do 50% 85 and 50% 91 blend to get you the 87 octane. It is very expensive to keep an extra tank and maintain it especially the older ones that need replacement. I have seen gas stations just shut down when time comes to replace the underground tanks. Its very expensive to do so if you own the tanks. Usually most stations, the tanks and the pumps are owned by the gas company so the station owner doesn't have to pony up the money come maintenance time.
 

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The previous model years called for 86. I haven't seen 86 available that often. I did see 85 once. Almost made the mistake of putting that in my truck, since I was so used to just grabbing the lowest grade pump. IIRC, that station had 85, 88, 90.
 
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