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Discussion Starter #1
I did my last spark plug change about 90K to 100k miles ago and am right now trying to change the plugs.

The last time, I put in the new plugs with anti-seize.

As I started to remove a couple of the front spark plugs, they were not coming out smoothly - they would turn but they did not break loose "cleanly" after the initial application of force. They would continue to offer a fair bit of resistance as I turned and almost made a "creaking" kind of sound.

I am confident that I can get them out but I want to know if I could be damaging the spark plug threads in the head (don't want to do that!!)

For the time being, I have tightened them back to where they were initially (I only loosened them about half a turn - then lost my nerve)

I do not want buggered heads - can somebody tell me for sure if it is ok to remove these plugs?

Thanks for the quick response.
 

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I don't think you have a choice. They've got to come out some time. My only thought to help the situation is to loosen them that 1/2 turn, and spray some penetrant (like PB Blaster or Liquid Wrench) down the sidewalls of the spark plug hole so it can get down into where the plugs are.

Did you use an suitable-for-aluminum anti-seize? There are a number of different types out there. Copper-based would not be choice, especially for the interface between spark plug and aluminum cylinder head.

OF
 

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I agree, they'll need to come out sometime.

I'd take one out slowly. Turn it out a single revolution, then back in a bit and out another turn and so on. This allows(in theory) for any grunge to fall out of the threads.

You probably are just working against the pulverized aluminum in the antiseize, minus its greasy carrier.

OF's idea of spraying a good amount of penetrating lube into the spark plug hole isn't a bad one either. It certainly won't hurt.
 

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let engine cool down as much as possible and grit teeth continue. If its stripped out not the end of world, can be fixed
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Anti-seize

Thanks for the quick responses, lads.

I used the silver Permatex paste. I have to assume that it is suitable for aluminum but I have not read the specifics on the container (I think the text is smeared from the container).

After re-tightening the two plugs I had loosened, I ran the van to check it out and there were no apparent leaks around the spark plug hole and the van seemed to run as usual.

I think I will do the half-turn, PB Blaster, 1/4 turn back in, repeat procedure.

I would have expected better out of the Permatex.

I will let you know how I make out.
 

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Re: Anti-seize

torontoody said:
I would have expected better out of the Permatex.

I will let you know how I make out.
Likewise, since this has been my anti-seize of choice for years (safe for aluminum, so it says). I yanked the plugs a while ago, and did the Permatex anti-seize treatment on both of our Odys.

We'll see how it turns out when I pull them at 105,000 miles for the timing belt service, which is coming soon for both of them. Keep us posted, T-Ody.

OF
 

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Few questions?

- Are they NGK platinum or iridium spec'd for Odyssey?

- If you were trying it when the engine was cold, try when engine is warm

NGK says adamantly that one should NOT use anti-seize on their plugs but that is different discussion.
 

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i had the same issue when i changed my plugs,(the resistance in taking them out) i stopped and thought that it may be attributed to the anti seize in the threads and may be something to live with due to using the permatex. the product most likely dried in there and formed a crust. perhaps to much was applied in the first place, perhaps ts not needed at all. much to debate,,
now, iridium or platinum plugs.
my originals were double platinum so thats what went back in
 

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100k on any plug wont come out butter smooth. That’s a long life, even with anti-seize use. Some anti-seize gums under long term and high temp usage, so thats probably what you felt. The point is they came out and probably didnt require a scary amount of torque to break loose.


Side note on Honda and NGK:

True Honda and NGK do not use anti-seize, and there are simple reasons why. Honda does not because its a messy, costly, "technically" not required by NGK.

NGK says not to use it for two reasons. One, they have a anti-corrosive coating on the threads. Two, when most people use anti-seize on plugs going into aluminum heads...THEY DONT REDUCE THE SPEC TORQUE and strip the threads.

Unless otherwise specified, torque specs are given for DRY threads. Anything applied to the threads will reduce the torque required to obtain the same required clamping force.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My current plugs...

Bosch Platinum.

I have purchased NGK Platinum plugs to go back in.

It's reassuring to see that others have encountered the resistance (creaking) while removing the plugs with no apparent ill effects.

I will press on with my cautious plug removal.

I will still use the Permatex anti-seize but I will try to change them sooner.

Maybe the NGKs will be less likely to produce this problem than the Bosch plugs (?).

Thanks.
 
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