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I will be preforming the valve adjustment procedure on my 2000 Honda Odyssey LX with 104 k miles for the 1st time . I have searched many of the threads but can't sfind the parts list for the valve adjustment for the 2nd Gen Honda Odyssey . I would appreciate someone posting the imformation or a link directing me to the
 

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Hi rkpatt,

Looking at the valve adjustment procedure on the service manual, it seems all you need is head cover gaskets or may be spark plug shaft rings if leaking. May be intake manifold gasket if you move it. Other then that, a torque wrench, screw driver, and a filler gauge to measure the gips and a box wrench or two. Let us know if there are anything else. Hope this helps.

Bruce
 

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2011 Odyssey LX, 120k miles
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"Gasket set, head cover" 12030-P8A-A00
That includes:
one "gasket, head cover" 12341-P8A-A00 (the valve cover gasket),
3 "seal, spark plug tube" 12342-P2F-A01, (spark plug tube seals), and
5 "washer, head cover" 90442-P8A-A00 (the rubber washer gaskets to seal the valve cover bolts)

So for one engine, you'll need two 12030-P8A-A00 kits. Looks like MSRP is around $35.68, and hondapartsdeals.com (for example) has them from $26.12 each.

At 105k miles, all these rubber parts are likely to have hardened and will need replacement if you want to avoid leaks. I recommend being extra careful to make sure the spark plug tube seals line up correctly when re-installing. I did all this on my '99 at 105k at the same time as I did the Timing Belt. I also replaced the intake manifold gasket 17105-P8A-A01 at the time.

When I did it, I did the full Timing Belt job (with all the bells and whistles), valve adjustment, cleaned out the throttle body and intake manifold. Some of these jobs are only loosely related, but I found it easier to do them all at once. The downside is that if something ends up being wrong when you put it all back together, it will be tougher to figure out, since you touched so many things. Still, I'd do them all together. I'm due for another TB soon (just went over 205k), but do not need to do the valves adjustment since I did that recently while chasing some other problem.
 

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Hi oldskewel,

Thanks for the additional info. Would you please let us know how bad were the gaps off the margin at 105k miles?

I am also planing to make the valves adjustment while it is a bit over 203k miles but still not sure if I really need to have it done. Please shed some more light on the subject and may be a little motivation.:)

Sorry to hijacking the thread.

Thanks,
Bruce
 

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I checked my notes, and I did not make any special ones for the 105k adjustment, but I was debugging something else at 190k and here's what I noted:

Valve adjustment

Remove intake manifold, valve covers.

Tough part is to then remove the front cam pulley cover: 5 10mm screws (careful not to drop one); to remove cover will then require loosening the 10mm screw holding the oil dipstick tube in place; loosen (but don't remove, otherwise it would be difficult to get it started again) screw then pulley cover can be pulled out (towards right side of car), allowing the indentation to clear the pulley; this step alone takes about 1 hour to remove and replace.

17mm socket on 1/2" breaker bar (not ratchet), rotate 4-5-6 cam pulley bolt clockwise until mark on edge of cam points to the #1 cylinder at TDC. Specifically, the little tick mark right on the edge of the pulley teeth lines up with the line on the cam housing. The other marks on the pulley, closer to the center, are for checking when looking through the rubber-plug-covered hole in the cam pulley cover. Ignore those.

Adjust intake valves first (2 per cylinder). Measure and note clearance prior to adjustment. Probably loose by about 0.02-0.04 mm.

Since all valves tended to loosen since last adjustment, I decided to aim for the lower bound when adjusting. Slide in feeler gauge equal to the lower bound (0.20 mm for intake, 0.28 mm for exhaust). Adjust screw while sliding feeler back and forth to find point where it binds, then back off that a hair and tighten the lock nut. Double check tightness after locking lock nut (10mm closed end wrench), and next size up in feeler gauge should only partially go in (e.g., some fraction of the width of the tappet).

Rotate cam pulley 60 degrees at a time, do for all 6 sets of intake valves.

Same thing for exhaust valves, except 0.28-0.32 mm spec; use second set of feeler gauges that has exact 0.28 mm feeler gauge.

Slightly smarter variation on the above might be to start with the #4 intake valve instead of #1, since it is more visible and accessible. Can get a feel for things on the easier ones before doing the back ones. The rear exhaust valves are purely by feel.

Measurements prior to adjustment in Feb 2011 at 190k miles
2 values are for the left (starboard) and right (port) valves in each pair, when facing the engine from the front of the car
cylinder # intake exhaust
spec 20-24 28-32 all values are in .01 mm
1 27, 27 31, 32
2 26, 25 32, 32
3 26, 26 28, 29 the exhaust valves were not adjusted
4 25, 28 30, 30 the exhaust valves were not adjusted
5 29, 25 31, 33
6 29, 27 30, 35 the left exhaust valve was not adjusted

Prior to this, there was no unusual valve noise, and doing the adjustment did not appear to change anything.
 

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Thanks odskewel, for your excellent procedure and details. I am going to make copy of it for future reference if you don't mine.
However, your last statement is surely encouraging and motivating. :):):)

Cheers!
Bruce
 

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You do not need to remove the cam pulley cover, there is a rubber cap that you remove and the cylinder number that is TDC is visible. ;)
 

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Does anyone know what size the valve adjustment locknuts are? I've heard 13mm, 10mm, and 7mm! Thanks!
 

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10mm, and I'm doing this right now, ~111,000 miles on this 2002 EX. All exhaust valves so far seem to be 1 thousandths too tight, and the intakes are 1 thousandths (as in inches) loose. Really, all were pretty darn close to spec. I hated to have to readjust them, but I might as well do it since I disassembled a bunch of stuff to get this far.

OF
 

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Video Honda J Series V6 Valve Adjustment (Part 1 & 2 ) -EricTheCarGuy

Eric the Car Guy Part I
Eric the Car Guy Part II

This V6 appears similar to my odyssey except I have cables going to my throttle body rather than fly by wire and not bonus plastic covers scattered around the engine compartment

I just did the EGR port cleanout to stop the recurring P0401 code and wish I had taken on the valve adjustment at the same time I was part way there.

If burning a valve is really an improbability, I will probably NOT take on valve adjustment and just keep driving my 2000 Ody LX until the kids are grown and my wife is again ready for a smaller car
 

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I am ready for shopping list now:
12030-P8A-A00

This come with PCV and gromet ( whole set of 2 and pcv )

https://www.ebay.com/itm/MADE-IN-JAPAN-VALVE-COVER-GASKET-PCV-KIT-HONDA-ACURA-V6-12030-P8A-A00-01/271610177837?fits=Year%3A2003%7CModel%3AOdyssey%7CSubmodel%3ALX%7CEngine+-+Liter_Display%3A3.5L%7CMake%3AHonda%7CTrim%3ALX+Mini+Passenger+Van+5-Door%7CEngine%3A3.5L+3474CC+V6+GAS+SOHC+Naturally+Aspirated&hash=item3f3d3a692d:g:yu8AAOSw8vNaaBTG:sc:USPSFirstClass!94582!US!-1
 

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I know this is an old thread, but I thought I'd add to it as I'm doing it, just in case some poor DIYer like myself thinks about doing the same. I watched tons of videos and read thru all the OdyClub posts, so I will try to confirm some things, clarify others, and make random comments.

I have a well-maintained 2003 Ody with 150K miles. Engine is J35A4, which is identical to the 2002-2004 Odyssey and 2003-2004 Pilot. The 1998-2001 Ody's use the J35A1 engine, slightly different.

My scope of work is valve adjustment, spark plugs, clean throttle body, EGR ports, and everything else that's filthy.

The Eric the Car Guy YouTubes were helpful, but his work was on a J32 (3.2L) Accord, so some of it is different. Most videos on Valve lash spend an endless amount of time on the adjustment itself, but skip all the work needed to get to that point. I find that getting there is the biggest part of the job. Endless connectors and hoses must be disconnected.

Here is one source of confusion -- which way to rotate engine. I have notes that indicate CW, then CCW, then scribble over that, and wrote CW again, then CCW again. So confusing. Here is my conclusion concerning the engine direction, based on visually watching the firing order valve sequencing -- "Clockwise" it is. Use a socket wrench with long extension and 19mm socket, and continually spin the engine clockwise. And it definitely helps to dial in the location with all the plugs removed. I did read one comment that rotating CCW could introduce hysteresis errors hitting TDC exactly.
 

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Besides the usual sockets and tools, you definitely need the gasket set. RockAuto has a Fel-Pro #VS50576R set for $40 complete -- 2 valve cover gaskets, 10 mounting grommets, and 6 spark plug tube seals. This is a must have. Old stuff was not reuseable.

The 3/8" drive 6 Pt 5/8" x 6" magnetic swivel spark plug socket for $12 on Amazon is well worth it. The Powerbuilt 10mm Jam Nut Valve adjusting tool for $20 was worth it, as was the CTA Tools A308 set of Offset valve tappet gauges for $13.

My EGR passages were almost completely clogged. Lots of paper towels, spray cleaner, and various dental picks helped.

Both valve cover gaskets were basically "welded" to the heads above the exhaust manifolds. Careful and tedious scraping with razor blade knife is required, and not at all fun on rear cover. Since working the back three cylinders is so hard to reach, extra lights, mirrors, and old blankets to lean on are helpful.
 

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As others have mentioned, everything under the front valve cover is "nickel" colored, and everything under the rear valve cover is "copper" colored. Kind of interesting. It was nice to see valves, rockers, arms so clean -- I guess changing the oil every 3K miles does help.
 

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IIRC, reading others who have done this valve lash adjustment, most were right on or only off by a mil or two. Mine have been off by 4 or 5 mils (mil = 0.001 inch) on average. Whereas the Intake spec is 8-9 mils, mine have run 12-13 mils. I guess that's why they were a little noisy, especially on startup.

Just the opposite with the exhaust valves. The spec is 12-14 mils, but mine have run 8-9 mils. If I could run the engine backwards, all the valves would have been just perfect! /sarc
 

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IIRC, reading others who have done this valve lash adjustment, most were right on or only off by a mil or two. Mine have been off by 4 or 5 mils (mil = 0.001 inch) on average. Whereas the Intake spec is 8-9 mils, mine have run 12-13 mils. I guess that's why they were a little noisy, especially on startup.

Just the opposite with the exhaust valves. The spec is 12-14 mils, but mine have run 8-9 mils. If I could run the engine backwards, all the valves would have been just perfect! /sarc
Very excellent posts, Pix
Buffalo4
 

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Very excellent posts, Pix
Buffalo4
Thanks

The 6 exhaust valves of the rear cylinders (#1-2-3) were definitely the most difficult to reach. I found working with a mirror impossible, because when I needed to go down-left-out I would go up-right-in. If you are a magician or a dentist, quite used to working with mirrors, you definitely will find that to be a useful skill. Lighting and shadows also made it difficult. I have a long penlight with a 15 in flexible end (Kobalt #451563) which was indispensable. Used it all the time to shed light on all the back adjustments, hose connections, and for the cylinder TDC alignments when rotating the engine. A while ago I read that between the ages of 25 and 50 our eyes take in only half the light they once did. Ain't that the truth, and I'm way past 50.

Since it's always easier to learn on the easier cylinders, I recommend doing the adjustments in the front first, then the back -- cylinders #4-5-6 and then #1-2-3. Doing them according to firing order seemed to make no sense.

Since the direction of the valve lash movement is so predictable over time, with all intake valves loosening and all exhaust valves tightening, I decided to start at the opposite end of the gap. For example, I targeted 8 mil (.008 inch) for the intake, and 13 mil for the exhaust. With each valve I would loosen the lock nut and valve adjuster and then insert a 9 mil shim for the intakes. I would then slowly tighten the adjuster until the 9 mil shim was somewhat "stuck." Then snug the lock nut a little. Take out the 9 mil and insert the 8 mil, which should slide nicely in the lash. Fully tighten the lock nut and check again. For the exhaust valves, I started with the 14 mil shim, making it too snug, and repeated the tightening, checking for 13 mil precision.

I was able to use the 10mm Jam Nut Valve adjusting tool for every valve, which was great. The handle seems to be the perfect length for torquing the lock nuts. Initially the handle kept sliding** on the tool while in use, but after a squirt of PL-1 Premium adhesive from my caulk gun into the plastic handle cover, it never moved again. (**Note for Powerbuilt engineers.)
 

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Best ... tool ... ever. Well, one of them.

160758


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