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I'm a little late to the party on this one but I was planning on doing a valve adjustment on my 2005 Odyssey and I wanted some thoughts on a couple things. I saw the video from Eric the Car Guy for the Honda J Series V6 Valve Adjustment (Parts 1 & 2). Although it was not an Odyssey I was wondering if the details of this video apply to my 2005 Odyssey. Anybody have any input of anything I should be aware of before starting my valve adjustment? Also, at how many miles should a valve adjustment be done for a 2005 Odyssey? If the gaskets still look good, do I absolutely need to change them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
OK, I'm FINALLY doing this after 130K Mikes. Here are some quick notes:

None of the valves where tight. I though this was strange since everyone says the exhaust are always a little tight.

I only had one bad spark plug hole seal (replaced that) and the valve cover O-rings looked good. I'm going to try to reuse them.

If you use a jack stand to hold the wrench side of and extension it's easier to line up TDC since you don't need to hold the wrench up.


Some measurements:

Cyll Intake Before/After Exhaust Before/After
1..........11/8,12/9.............16/13,12/13 (I think the before 12 was wrong. I did this in two passes and on the 2md pass it was a little loose)
2) ........14/9,13,9.............12/12,15/12
3) .........14/8,14/9.............15/13,15/12
4) .........11/9,11,9.............15/13,13/13
5).........12/9,12/9..............14/13,15/12
6)..........12/9,12/9.............14/13,15/13


On the pipe from the intake to the air box there are 2 hoses that appear to be attached, really you only need to remove the big one. The other is an antifreeze hose.

I didn't have the special tool, It may have helped, but there are some spots that might have been too tight for it. Some good flat time screwdrivers of different length are helpful.

I could find my seal puller. It was a pain to remove the spark plug hole seal without it.

Eric the car guy's video is pretty good. Without and FSM I would say to take some photos with your phone (so you can get back by the firewall) and then print/write on them along with the R&R steps from the video. I wish I did that even with the FSM....

That's all I have for now, the intake is not on yet. That will get a new gasket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Also, I can't see doing this without angled feeler gauges that can be used one at a time (some sets come apart and some are riveted together...).
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Some good flat time screwdrivers of different length are helpful.

I could find my seal puller. It was a pain to remove the spark plug hole seal without it.
I wish we could go back and fix


Fixes for above:

Some good flat tip screwdrivers of different length are helpful.

I couldn't find my seal puller. It was a pain to remove the spark plug hole seal without it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I just caught something. The FSM calls for 10 FT/Lbs on the "Front" valve lock nuts and 14 Ft/Lbs on the "Rear". However, it's not clear what they mean by "Front" and "Rear" I could see them meaning 1,2,3 as Rear and 4,5,6 as front OR it could be intakes are "Front" and exhausts are "Rear".

I know they're all at least 10, but I'm going to pull the valve covers (intake is still off) and tighten the "Rear" if anyone know for sure what ones need 14.
 

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bringing this back from the dead in 2021 - if there is a better thread for this info, please move or let me know.

Just did this on my '09 EXL over the weekend.

1) Its an entire weekend. plan for that amount of time.

2) straight feeler gauges will cause you nothing but pain. I found a set of 45* gauges and they were tolerable. a set of 90* and a set of 45* would be ideal.
Take them out of their 'holder' and spread them out on a piece of cardboard that sits in the engine bay near you. Its not worth it to always be twisting and finagling the things in the factory holder (ie: take the feeler gauges out of thier switch-bladey thing.)

3) every single one of my valves was .003" to .006 inches wider than spec. All of them, intake and exhaust. This is a 140k mile engine where I think the valves have never been adjusted before.

4) The engine noise/ticking was never bad. And it might be a bit 'nicer' now, but neither the dealer nor my wife ever complained about the noise. (I can find a noise on any engine that I think suspicious, but since the wife has no mechanical aptitude, I tell myself "If she doesn't hear anything funny, then nothing needs fixed" :)

(the dealer mentioned this service at 100k, and wanted $350 to do it on top of a timing belt job...this was 2 years ago...I should have paid them...and demanded numbers :)

5) Engine was making ok power and getting 18-21mpgs (unloaded) before. I kinda wonder what I'll get now that every valve is opening .005" more than it was before :)

6) Every Honda V6 from 200x(?) to today(?) is the J35. So millions of Odysseys, Pilots, MDX, Accord V6s and others are running around with this motor...that needs its valves adjusted... I dont know of anyone that has actually done this (except a small % that throw their Honda at a dealer and give them a blank check to keep it running...) How many other Honda V6s are running around with misadjusted valves ?

7) take Extra time on the re-assembly - it will now be hours/days since you disassembled the top ends to get in there. make sure you use a light, feel around the back and sides, account for every screw. Last time I had the cover off, I left the front O2 sensors disconnected - that CEL takes a few cycles to reset.

8) the rear valve cover just SUCKS. be prepared to just stretch the wires to get the cover out (and then back in again). new gaskets and Hondabond have already been discussed. Hopefully this should help by oil consumption/loss issues.

Thats all. I just wanted to add some notes to an existing thread, in case someone is considering doing this in the near future. (I mean, every Honda V6 out there could probably use this...)
-John
 

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3) every single one of my valves was .003" to .006 inches wider than spec. All of them, intake and exhaust. This is a 140k mile engine where I think the valves have never been adjusted before.

4) The engine noise/ticking was never bad. And it might be a bit 'nicer' now, but neither the dealer nor my wife ever complained about the noise. (I can find a noise on any engine that I think suspicious, but since the wife has no mechanical aptitude, I tell myself "If she doesn't hear anything funny, then nothing needs fixed" :)

(the dealer mentioned this service at 100k, and wanted $350 to do it on top of a timing belt job...this was 2 years ago...I should have paid them...and demanded numbers :)

5) Engine was making ok power and getting 18-21mpgs (unloaded) before. I kinda wonder what I'll get now that every valve is opening .005" more than it was before :)

6) Every Honda V6 from 200x(?) to today(?) is the J35. So millions of Odysseys, Pilots, MDX, Accord V6s and others are running around with this motor...that needs its valves adjusted... I dont know of anyone that has actually done this (except a small % that throw their Honda at a dealer and give them a blank check to keep it running...) How many other Honda V6s are running around with misadjusted valves ?
Generally the valves get tighter on this engine over time, specifically the exhaust valves.

A valve adjustment typically won't cure a performance problem on its own.

Usually a good time to adjust the valves is between 150-200k.
 
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Ill add a bit to this. #2 above is dead on. Angled gauges removed from the holder. I also marked mine in big numbers with a paint pen.
Secondly, I bought the special tool and cut the handle short.
Third, its very important to note the oclock position of each screw before you loosen it to adjust it. You quickly get a good idea of how far it has to go to make up the discrepency from spec and if you didnt get it right the first time.
Lastly, there are no short cuts regarding that rear harness. I had to do much of the job twice because the rear valve cover leaked. Bad. The second time I removed a lot of things I didnt the first time like the ps pump and the bolt under it that released that harness enough to let me zip tie it to the bottom of the cowling.
Also Hondabond is nothing special. Save a few bucks and get permatex grey high torque gasket maker. I think its virtually the same thing.
You shouldnt need to replace any intake manifold gaskets. If you feel you do, hit me up and Ill sell you the mahle ones I didnt use cheap. It was too late to return em to rock auto.
I also bought a "top sider jr." overhead creeper based on some recommendations. Seemed like a good idea and I guarantee my back is as bad as anyones'.
Didnt end up using it it would have just gotten in the way. A blanket will go just as good. It was only $25 shipped so no big deal.
22 out of 24 valves were off, none more than .003, most were off .002. all of them, intake loose, exhaust tight.
This is a big job for a DIYer. But it is doable.
 

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Ill add a bit to this. #2 above is dead on. Angled gauges removed from the holder. I also marked mine in big numbers with a paint pen.
Secondly, I bought the special tool and cut the handle short.
Third, its very important to note the oclock position of each screw before you loosen it to adjust it. You quickly get a good idea of how far it has to go to make up the discrepency from spec and if you didnt get it right the first time.
Lastly, there are no short cuts regarding that rear harness. I had to do much of the job twice because the rear valve cover leaked. Bad. The second time I removed a lot of things I didnt the first time like the ps pump and the bolt under it that released that harness enough to let me zip tie it to the bottom of the cowling.
Also Hondabond is nothing special. Save a few bucks and get permatex grey high torque gasket maker. I think its virtually the same thing.
You shouldnt need to replace any intake manifold gaskets. If you feel you do, hit me up and Ill sell you the mahle ones I didnt use cheap. It was too late to return em to rock auto.
I also bought a "top sider jr." overhead creeper based on some recommendations. Seemed like a good idea and I guarantee my back is as bad as anyones'.
Didnt end up using it it would have just gotten in the way. A blanket will go just as good. It was only $25 shipped so no big deal.
22 out of 24 valves were off, none more than .003, most were off .002. all of them, intake loose, exhaust tight.
This is a big job for a DIYer. But it is doable.
Out of curiosity, what was the mileage on your van? I've got 220km(140 miles) on the ody I just bought and will be doing the timing belt as I don't think it's been done. Not sure if I should do the valves now or next timing belt change...
 

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wowzer, this thread is over 8 years old.
For those recommending angles gauges, you are right that the make things alot simpler, but what I did was get a set of straight feeler gauges and put a bend into them.
I actually have a set of long angled feeler gauges, but they are not comfortable to use at all.

For gaskets, for initial job I went with all honda parts. That was many moons ago. Now I just buy comprehensive gasket set by Mahle from Rockauto and good to go. Every gasket is included.
I suggest checking out front PCV valve and either clean it or replace it as well.

Finally, wanted to share an insane story.
Was working on 2009 Honda Accord v6, VCM2 engine. Guy asked me to do comprehensive service, including valve adjustments.
I noticed the car had a bit of a hesitation when cold, but did not pay too much attention to it.
I complete the job, and first thing that struck me was that this car had worst valve gaps I have ever seen in the car. The worst cylinders were 1-4 (aka VCM cylinders)
Exhaust were 0.016-0.019 and over, I just stopped at 0.019 (spec 0.011-0.013)
Intake were 0.011-0.015 (spec 0.008-0.009)
After I finished the job, to my horror, the car was badly misfiring when cold. Mostly rear bank (cyl 1-3).
Since I never worked on this car before, I asked the owner the history of the car. It did have timing belt done on time using Honda parts.
Long story short, it turned out that timing belt was installed wrong. The rear bank was retarded by 1 tooth. I fixed the belt and car runs like a top now.
It had been 6 years since timing belt was done on this car. I have no idea how this car drove all this time, but clearly misadjusted valves compensated for
bad timing and it worked out at the end.
 

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Man! that was a double edge knife. Had you not found the cause of the misfiring, the owner would have thought you caused the misfiring.
I think that is the nightmare scenario of every mechanic. Glad it had a good ending. People probably don't give you enough credit for that.
 

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Man! that was a double edge knife. Had you not found the cause of the misfiring, the owner would have thought you caused the misfiring.
I think that is the nightmare scenario of every mechanic. Glad it had a good ending. People probably don't give you enough credit for that.
For sure. Luckily, I scanned the car before turning it on and saw the misfire codes, so that triggered basic CYA instinct in me and I saved scan results.
It does not help that this is VCM2 engine known for misfires. Owner knew that the car had ongoing misfire issues, but was likely confused on the source of them.
This was definitely a hard lesson to learn, and lucky for me, owner was understanding and had no issues with my work. Next time, could be completely
opposite.
 
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