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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, new here. Until maybe the last two months we have never had any issue with our 2011 Ody. Since that time, we have noticed a considerable amount of oil consumption and occasional puffs of blue smoke. Smoke is not on start up or heavy acceleration, just very random. I replaced the PCV valve and for a few weeks thought I had remedied the problem, but we have noticed the smoke again in the last couple days. I have been reading more and more about VCM issues with these engines as well as the piston ring recall. Being that the car is 2011, I'm sure we are just outside of the 8 year from original purchase period that Honda is honoring for this issue, meaning any repairs would surely rest solely on our shoulders.

So on to my question: would installing a muzzler fix the issue FROM THIS POINT ON? Or is the damage already done and ring job (or something else) would still need to be done anyways? Secondly, which muzzler would you recommend? I have seen Verbatim to be a popular choice.

Thanks in advance!
 

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You can hope muzzling it might save it, you might still get stuck with getting a ring job. Verbatim is good to deal with. Had his first series 1 on my old Ody. Then I upgraded to a different model because I towed and wanted to know exactly what the coolant temp was. Verbatim's new VCMuzzler II is much better. I ended up switching to the S-VCM. To each their own, but you can't go wrong with Verbatim!!! Contact him on the site via pm. You will save yourself the Ebay charges.
 

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I second Verbatim. I bought one from him about 5 months ago for our 2017. I muzzled it with 43,000 on the odo. It works great!

You might check in to a TSB or warranty on your 2011 depending on the miles you have. I thought there was some sort of extended warranty offered through Honda or there was a class action lawsuit pertaining to this very issue.
 

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Is Verbatim the same as VCM Tuner? Cannot locate the verbatim website...
Verbatim (who produces the VCMuzzler II) doesn't have a website, as far as I know. He sells through eBay or through forum contacts, which is the better way to go. If you send @verbatim a private message here on Odyclub, he'll respond to you pretty quickly. He tends to be very good about that.

The VCMTuner is produced by a different person.
 
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The guy selling the VCMTunerII is in California and cannot sell one in California...You have to have him send it to a friend in another state...
 

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I have been using the VCMTUNER II for almost 1 year and 15K miles. It works well and I appreciate that it allows for certain maintenance procedures and being alerted to overheating conditions as soon as they occur. I didn't know it couldn't be sold in CA though (I'm in IL so it wasn't an issue).
 

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I didn't know it couldn't be sold in CA though (I'm in IL so it wasn't an issue).
I believe the manufacturer is trying to go through CARB approval for it, which means he/they have to play by the rules. It could be considered a device that changes emissions... At least that's what I remember seeing when I was doing the research (California resident here...). It is easy enough to just remove the fuse on the SVCM device to disable it when needed that I wasn't worried about missing the g-sensor in the VCMTuner II.

-Charlie
 

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Discussion Starter #9
In the interest of closure... I went with the S-VCM. I liked the redundancy in the event there was an overheat issue and not having to mess with resistors.

Has been installed around a week and a half and so far so good. Much smoother power delivery and most importantly no noticeable burning yet; but it has been very intermittent leading up to this so we are keeping our fingers crossed. Thanks for all the input!
 

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9k on our S-VCM, it's like it's not even there. No issues, no problems, just six cylinders running all the time.

Enjoy!
 

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Question for other muzzler users. I have the stock resistor on it. Though in summer time, the idling on highway in stop and go kicks eco mode on. Should I change the resistor or just not mind it and let car "cool down"?
 

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Question for other muzzler users. I have the stock resistor on it. Though in summer time, the idling on highway in stop and go kicks eco mode on. Should I change the resistor or just not mind it and let car "cool down"?
I had a VCMuzzler II with the recommended blue resistor installed for about 2 years in my van and the VCM would kick on a handful of times during the summer. I never did anything about it - having VCM come on for a grand total of an hour per year isn't a big deal.

The only people who absolutely NEED VCM disabled 100% of the time without exception are those gen 3 owners who replaced their active engine mounts with static ones. That's not possible for us gen 4 guys, so don't get too worked up about it unless you are noticing that ECO mode stays active for a long time. Our van would cool down enough in city traffic within a few minutes once we hit about 60 km/h or so.
 

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Question for other muzzler users. I have the stock resistor on it. Though in summer time, the idling on highway in stop and go kicks eco mode on. Should I change the resistor or just not mind it and let car "cool down"?
Just run it as is. I'm not sure why people are so afraid of having VCM kick in a few times here and there. As soon as you are up and running at speed the engine will cool back down and the muzzler will work as intended. (of course, this is coming form someone that has an S-VCM installed... but I have disabled it for testing here and there since installing it)

-Charlie
 

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What is the deal with "cooling back down"?
I'm not sure I understand what you are getting at...

The OEM thermostat tries to keep the engine around 172*F. When driving down the road at speed, the coolant in the radiator is cooled off sufficiently for this to happen. If you have a OBD-II scanner on a non-muzzled van, the coolant temp will stay between 170*F and 175*F while driving at speed (say, above 25mph).

(note, all numbers below are from memory and may be wrong - the point is still valid)

Anytime the van is moving slowly or stopped (traffic, around town, waiting at lights, etc.), the radiator is no longer working to cool the coolant. The fans for the radiator do not turn on (if AC is off) until the coolant exiting the radiator is 195* - in series (low speed). The fans to not turn on high until 205*F. If the AC compressor is active, the fans are always on in series (low speed) unless coolant temp is above 195*F or AC pressures get too high (then they go to high speed). The fans will turn back off when the temps lower by 5-10*F from there. The temperature gauge on the dash will read 'normal' from around 160*F to 210*F or higher, so there is no way to see this unless you have an OBD-II reader reporting this data.

All this is to say that the engine runs ~20-30*F hotter when idling or moving slowly that it does on the highway. That's why the standard fixed-resistor muzzlers can sometimes allow the ECO light on in traffic or the summer around town. If you add too much resistance to the system with the goal to keep the ECO light off at all times, the ECU will think the engine never reaches full operating temperature and throw a code for that instead.

-Charlie
 
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