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Discussion Starter #1
I didn't see a lot about VCMTuner II so I thought I'd start a new thread.

I only recently learned about the issues with VCM reading threads on OdyClub, and even though my '07 Touring with 130K miles doesn't have symptoms (high oil consumption, fouled plugs, etc.) I decided to disable it as a preventative measure. Since my wife primarily drives the Odyssey, I was attracted to a solution that didn't need to be manually readjusted periodically based on season (she probably wouldn't notice if the ECO light started coming back on).

I saw a thread about S-VCM which looked like a good solution because it didn't need to be manually adjusted, and displayed the correct temperature on the gauge if the actual temperature was too high. I asked about people's experience with S-VCM, which was positive, but John Clark also turned me on to the VCMTuner II which is similar S-VCM, but with added features. There is an accelerometer which will automatically override suppression when the vehicle is at idle, is at operating temperature, and sits for more than 2 minutes for diagnostic procedures. You can activate an Audible engine coolant alarm when the actual temperature exceeds 212F. If you want, you could also install a toggle switch in the cabin to manually enable / disable VCM. There is also a connection for a future optional add-on engine coolant level alarm.

In the end I decided to get the VCMTuner II as the S-VCM was out of stock, when shipping charges were considered, the VCMTuner II was less than $20 more expensive and the added functionality was worth it to me. With the cheapest shipping option (First Class USPS mail), I received it in only 4 days (ordered on Thursday, arrived on Monday).

Today I installed it. It was probably slightly more involved than S-VCM (there is a box which mounts over a battery hold down bracket post with a wing nut provided) but was easy and straight forward none the less. Since installing it, I haven't driven it a lot, but enough to know VCM is suppressed (no ECO light) and there were no codes generated.

I'm planning on keeping it in the standard configuration for a few days, but will probably go ahead and activate the engine coolant alarm feature over the weekend. I'll post updates as I get more experience with it.
 

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Thanks for the post on this. Can you post a pic of your install? I have the variable resister unit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
20190115_093838.jpg

The bracket in view is attached to the top of unit's box and is fixed to the battery hold down post with a wing nut. The bracket is made to wrap around the wiring from the + post of the battery and comes with the rubber material as shown. The box hangs down between the battery and air cleaner.

20190115_093920.jpg

There is a wiring harness coming off the unit. The female connector plugs into the ECT1 sensor and the male connector attaches to the harness that otherwise plugs into the sensor.

20190115_094302.jpg

Here is a picture of the harness connected up.

20190115_094704.jpg

Here is showing the connection to the + battery terminal. If you look closely you can see the inline fuse holder (with fuse) that is part of the unit.

There is also a blue wire coming from the unit for future optional use, and a green wire which can be attached to ground to re-enable VCM. The green wire can also be grounded intermittently to activate optional features (for example touch it to ground 10 times in 90 second window to activate Audible Engine Coolant Alarm).

I hope this helps.
 

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I decided to see if the Automatic diagnostic mode worked (automatically disables suppression after parked for 2 minutes). I couldn't really tell from the temperature gauge, so I hooked up my OBDII tool.

I found when driving it was showing a constant 72C / 162F for coolant temperature. I parked it in my driveway running while unloading shopping, so I didn't time it accurately, but after coming back from taking one load in the house it still showed 72C / 162F. After returning from taking the second load in it had changed to read 92C / 198F. I then drove it around the block and the temperature dropped straight from 92C / 198F back to 72C / 162F.

Bottom line is it works as advertised so it will be good for maintenance procedures where you want the actual temperature to be received by the ECU.
 

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I decided to see if the Automatic diagnostic mode worked (automatically disables suppression after parked for 2 minutes). I couldn't really tell from the temperature gauge, so I hooked up my OBDII tool.

I found when driving it was showing a constant 72C / 162F for coolant temperature. I parked it in my driveway running while unloading shopping, so I didn't time it accurately, but after coming back from taking one load in the house it still showed 72C / 162F. After returning from taking the second load in it had changed to read 92C / 198F. I then drove it around the block and the temperature dropped straight from 92C / 198F back to 72C / 162F.

Bottom line is it works as advertised so it will be good for maintenance procedures where you want the actual temperature to be received by the ECU.
Good to know. There was a lot of conversation in the S-VCM thread about the behaviour of the coolant temperature gauge in the instrument panel and how it is not responsive to changes in temperature within a particular range of operation defined as normal by Honda. You probably can't tell by looking only at the gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good to know. There was a lot of conversation in the S-VCM thread about the behaviour of the coolant temperature gauge in the instrument panel and how it is not responsive to changes in temperature within a particular range of operation defined as normal by Honda. You probably can't tell by looking only at the gauge.
That is what I observed, and it does make me wonder if you have one of the resistor based VCM suppressors if you would be able to notice an overheating condition from the gauge. I could not tell any difference on the gauge with a 36F difference in temperature displayed through OBDII.

In this regard I think the VCMTuner II's optional engine coolant alarm seems like a nice feature. If the actual temperature exceeds 212F it is supposed to trigger a P0118 code which will cause a VSA alarm and Check engine light and apparently the temperature needle shoots to the top of the range.
 

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Thanks for the very helpful info, just have a question about the cooling fan, did you ever notice the cooling fan runs when your at idle or stop at stop light?
 

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Thanks for the very helpful info, just have a question about the cooling fan, did you ever notice the cooling fan runs when your at idle or stop at stop light?
I think the fans ran (not positive though) when I tested the Auto Diagnostic Feature and the temperature was showing 92C / 198F. I haven't noticed them running when sitting at a stoplight, but I wouldn't expect them to if controlled by the ECT1 sensor since you are typically not stopped at one for over 2 minutes. Also, it's winter here and there have only been a few days since I installed it having temperatures above 32F with the highest being 50F.

Per the manual this feature is designed to activate when the vehicle sits for more than 2 minutes and the temperature from the ECT exceeds 195F over this duration.

Anyone know at what temperature the cooling fans are supposed to turn on and if they are controlled by the same ECT1 sensor?
 

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I've been running the VCMTunerII and have had zero issues and zero ECO activations. I've done one idle relearn and it's an absolute breeze. I haven't used any of the advanced features but I'm a big fan of the VCMTunerII.
 
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I think the fans ran (not positive though) when I tested the Auto Diagnostic Feature and the temperature was showing 92C / 198F. I haven't noticed them running when sitting at a stoplight, but I wouldn't expect them to if controlled by the ECT1 sensor since you are typically not stopped at one for over 2 minutes. Also, it's winter here and there have only been a few days since I installed it having temperatures above 32F with the highest being 50F.

Per the manual this feature is designed to activate when the vehicle sits for more than 2 minutes and the temperature from the ECT exceeds 195F over this duration.

Anyone know at what temperature the cooling fans are supposed to turn on and if they are controlled by the same ECT1 sensor?
I received the following from Brock who makes the VCMTuner II about the cooling fans in a separate E-mail:

"They will cycle when the temp hits 194F on and off. The ECT2 sensor also causes it to cycle on my 2007 at this temperature, but will not complete the TPS-relearn unless ECT1 is at the 194F mark or higher. (90c)."

So the cooling fans should cycle whenever the temperature is high enough, even if VCM is being disabled by the VCMTuner II since the fans would be triggered by the ECT2 sensor.

Also, my recollection that the cooling fans were running should be accurate as the temperature was 198F per my ODBII scan tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Great information! I'm researching the S-VCM and VCMtuner II for our van. Thanks for the feedback.
I'm glad it's useful.

One other thing to note, besides the acceleremeter and the advanced features, the VCMTuner II also comes with an inline fuse holder and fuse - something I understand that does not come on the S-VCM and some people have added on there own. I know it's not a huge deal or added expense, but it is a bit more of a hassle and does chip away into the price premium of the VCMTuner II if you want an inline fuse.
 

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I've been running the VCMTunerII and have had zero issues and zero ECO activations. I've done one idle relearn and it's an absolute breeze. I haven't used any of the advanced features but I'm a big fan of the VCMTunerII.
I haven't activated the advanced features yet either. It hasn't been a big priority. Maybe if we finally get a warm day around here.
 

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Since this is a short thread, I'll ask the question here. I have the "original" VCM Muzzler and it has worked well for me for the last 60K miles and 5 years.

Is there a reason to upgrade? Is VCMTuner II the newest thing? I've not kept up. I'm the info and reviews are there. Could someone summarize it in simple terms for me? Thanks.
 

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Since this is a short thread, I'll ask the question here. I have the "original" VCM Muzzler and it has worked well for me for the last 60K miles and 5 years.

Is there a reason to upgrade? Is VCMTuner II the newest thing? I've not kept up. I'm the info and reviews are there. Could someone summarize it in simple terms for me? Thanks.
VCMTuner II (and S-VCM, which is similar) is the newest thing. It still manipulates ECT1 into returning a lower-than-actual temperature to keep VCM disabled, but it uses programming on a circuit board instead of a resistor to modify the signal. It's a more precise and more consistent method; VCM is disabled fully 100% of the time with either one of these two devices. You don't get the occasional ECO indicator with these.

These are also safer because they are programmed to shut themselves off in the event of an actual overheat condition. You will see all of the factory-intended warnings about high engine coolant temperature with these installed, and they will go off at the same time as they would if there was no VCM disabler installed.

The VCMTuner II is a little more advanced than S-VCM in that it can recognize when the van is being warmed up while stationary for service and repairs. S-VCM, like a VCMuzzler, has to be removed or disconnected for throttle position sensor re-learns. The VCMTuner II is probably the current state-of-the-art, and S-VCM is a half-step behind.

Is it worth upgrading? Hard to say - it depends on a few things. I had a VCMuzzler and upgraded because I wanted to have the auto-shutoff fail-safe for when my wife and kids were travelling without me in the summertime. In terms of the protections offered to the engine itself, I'd say it's probably not worth upgrading only for that. I doubt I would have upgraded if I was going to be the one doing most of the driving this past summer.

If you're starting from scratch and have no VCM disabler at all, then I think going for VCMTuner II or S-VCM is definitely the way to go. They're more expensive than the resistor-based Muzzlers, but I'd say the price premium is worth it.
 
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Since this is a short thread, I'll ask the question here. I have the "original" VCM Muzzler and it has worked well for me for the last 60K miles and 5 years.

Is there a reason to upgrade? Is VCMTuner II the newest thing? I've not kept up. I'm the info and reviews are there. Could someone summarize it in simple terms for me? Thanks.
Yes, VCMTuner II is the newest thing.

The advantages of it, or S-VCM, is unlike the resistor products, there is never a need (or even possible) to manually change resistance if with change of season the ECO light starts coming on or CEL is generated. This was important to me because my wife normally drives the Ody and the ECO light isn't something she would probably notice.

The other big advantage in my opinion is that if there is an overheating condition, the correct ECT1 resistance is passed to the computer and displays accurate temperature on the dash. With the resistance products being passive, the temperature perceived by the computer will always be less than actual and I'm not sure you would be able to easily detect an overheating condition (see above where with 36F difference in temperature registered by the computer I couldn't tell on the gauge). VCMTuner II goes further and as an option you can set it so an alarm will be triggered with an overheating condition.

The big advantages of VCMTuner II over S-VCM are related to maintenance procedures and having it include an inline fuse. Read above for more details. With either a resistance product like VCMuzzler or S-VCM you would have to remember to remove it (or at least disconnect power with the S-VCM) to perform certain procedures, which you do not with VCMTuner II.

Another good thread about why you might want to upgrade to these more advanced products is:
https://www.odyclub.com/forums/54-2011-2017-odyssey/346459-switched-vcmuzzler-s-vcm.html

Bottom line is I wouldn't say there is a need to upgrade as long as you are fine continuing to live with the limitations of the VCMuzzler as you have the past 5 years. If you don't want to live with the limitations, then these other product options are available.
 

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Do I really need to have inline fuse for S-VCM? I just saw the VCMTUNER II and I see it came with one. However, I have the SVCM. Did I just buy the wrong one :(
 
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