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Hi Everyone,

I posted a thread regarding my 2016 Odyssey SE and an ongoing issue with the rotor's getting warped:

"Anyone have the contact information for Honda consumer affairs? I have had an issue on my 2016 Honda Odyssey brake rotors continuously warping. Each time I take it to the dealer I'm either informed that it's normal behavior due to the weight of the van or they resurface the rotors. I've never had this experience with other vehicles especially on my Suburban which is heavier. Each time the rotor is resurfaced the shaking disappears temporarily and comes back with the shaking even worse. I've asked the dealer to replace the rotors which they will charge me for, I'm still under warranty, and they mentioned it will be the same rotors therefore the warping issue will occur. If anyone else has this issue, let me know how you resolved. Thank you. "

I see that a lot of recommendations within that thread and others is to go with a non OEM rotors and pads. The most recommended ones is the centric rotors and akebono pads. For those who have done this, can you tell me what the part number is that you've ordered. I see different types of models for these rotors and pads and want to just get the correct one.

TIA.
 

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I realize it is a long and winding thread, with lots suggestions and little detail, but if you ask in that thread all the folks who are subscribed to it will get a notified they might have their invoices with actual model numbers.
 

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Did you get measurements that they were warped? Resurfacing is easy money for the shop. Were the bedded properly? Some times what appear to be warped rotors just need to be rebedded.

Here's more info

 

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These are the front rotors I used for my 2015 EX-L:
Front rotors purchased on TireRack: Centric PLain 120 Series Rotors, Manufacturer Part #: 120.40092
Front brake pads purchased on Amazon: Akebono Brake Pad Kit, Manufacturer Part Number ACT1089
 

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It takes tremendous abuse to warp rotors and to feel it with floating calipers. In 40 years of doing my own auto repairs this is the first time I had a "warping" problem

I had the same issue on our 2014 Ody.
2015: After 1 year 30k km front rotors vibrated on braking. Changed to new Honda rotors. seem an updated part number. Reused pads not worn much
2016:A year later and at 65K km. same problem. Changed to aftermarket rotors. Still used original pads.
2017:Another year at 100K km same problem again.. this time changed rotors AND pads.
2020: 180K km no problems yet!
So my conclusion was that it is not warped rotors but the rotor-pad interface and incorrect bedding of the pads.

If you do lots of searching of warped rotors you will find some excellent info confirming that it is rarely warped rotors but poor bedding of the pads that create an uneven surface over time.
 

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It takes tremendous abuse to warp rotors and to feel it with floating calipers. In 40 years of doing my own auto repairs this is the first time I had a "warping" problem

I had the same issue on our 2014 Ody.
2015: After 1 year 30k km front rotors vibrated on braking. Changed to new Honda rotors. seem an updated part number. Reused pads not worn much
2016:A year later and at 65K km. same problem. Changed to aftermarket rotors. Still used original pads.
2017:Another year at 100K km same problem again.. this time changed rotors AND pads.
2020: 180K km no problems yet!
So my conclusion was that it is not warped rotors but the rotor-pad interface and incorrect bedding of the pads.

If you do lots of searching of warped rotors you will find some excellent info confirming that it is rarely warped rotors but poor bedding of the pads that create an uneven surface over time.
Or... the problem was reusing the OEM brake pads. I changed the stock pads out on my 2014 after 10,000 miles to Brembo Ceramics (middle of the road pads, manufacturered by Akebono). I'm at 100k miles, with no issues. There are dozens of these threads about "warped rotors", recommending aftermarket and/or cryo treated rotors. The issue is the pads leaving deposits on the surface of the rotors. Sounds to me like one should change their pads to a compound suitable for the temperatures being generated and/or the conditions they are being subjected to. I am on OEM rotors, by the way. I always try to start with the easiest, cheapest solution.
 

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OEM Pads, Rotors or both the issue? I don't care, Centric Premium's and Posi-Quiets are on our '16 EXL. I would recommend Akebono's however as I have this combo on my '07 Avalon front and rear and they've been great (less mess, more consistent, etc. In fact I might order a set of Akebono's for the Odyssey this Spring.

Good luck!
 

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Hi Everyone,

I posted a thread regarding my 2016 Odyssey SE and an ongoing issue with the rotor's getting warped:

"Anyone have the contact information for Honda consumer affairs? I have had an issue on my 2016 Honda Odyssey brake rotors continuously warping. Each time I take it to the dealer I'm either informed that it's normal behavior due to the weight of the van or they resurface the rotors. I've never had this experience with other vehicles especially on my Suburban which is heavier. Each time the rotor is resurfaced the shaking disappears temporarily and comes back with the shaking even worse. I've asked the dealer to replace the rotors which they will charge me for, I'm still under warranty, and they mentioned it will be the same rotors therefore the warping issue will occur. If anyone else has this issue, let me know how you resolved. Thank you. "

I see that a lot of recommendations within that thread and others is to go with a non OEM rotors and pads. The most recommended ones is the centric rotors and akebono pads. For those who have done this, can you tell me what the part number is that you've ordered. I see different types of models for these rotors and pads and want to just get the correct one.

TIA.
 

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I don’t know why this knowledge is not more common but I believe that almost all cases of warped rotors are caused by “hot stops”. Whenever you stop with very hot rotors, which can happen in hilly or mountain driving, or even with one long hill descent say in SF, if you come to a complete stop for more than a couple of seconds and stay in one spot without moving, your brake pads cover one spot on the rotor, keeping it from cooling while the rest of the rotor is open to the air the uneven cooling will warp the rotor. It can happen to even new OEM rotors. To avoid warping, get in the habit of stopping a car length behind the car in front of you and let your car very slowly creep forwards at the light so the rotor can cool evenly. Make sense? Ask around. I typically get over 100k on my rotors because I refuse to turn them every time I change padS to get all the scratches out (the new pads will do that) If you have no warping, you have no need to turn them. If you do warp them then it’s usually cheaper to just buy the cheapest new rotors Than to pay to turn them, making them thinner and even easier to heat up and warp. They are just cheap cast iron even OEMS. Remember, red hot rotors are not the problem. Hot full, non moving stops are the culprit.
 

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OEM Pads, Rotors or both the issue? I don't care, Centric Premium's and Posi-Quiets are on our '16 EXL. I would recommend Akebono's however as I have this combo on my '07 Avalon front and rear and they've been great (less mess, more consistent, etc. In fact I might order a set of Akebono's for the Odyssey this Spring.

Good luck!
You might want to measure for a warped rotor before assuming it's a warped pad. Measure the rotor runout using a dial indicator. When I have felt a need to replace parts due to brake vibration the rotor runout measured over .004 inches. I believe that is also a Honda spec for replacing or turning rotors.

Quite a few years ago I started measuring the runout on the replacement rotor installation and I found that one of the five positions on the hubs resulted in a bit less runout than in the other four positions. I haven't had to replace any rotors when I installed them in this way. That runout came in at less than .002 inches each time I used a dial indicator. Three lug nuts and three 3/4" lengths of schedule 40 PVC pipe will secure the rotor tightly enough to get a good measurement. Wire brushing the hub may also help..
 

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Turning the rotors removes metal which negatively affects heat dissipation. You should replace the rotors with some that are cryo treated.

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You are right about removing material being bad. But I would not recommend cryo treated rotors. I bought some cryo treated centric rotors and they warped just as quickly as the ones that came with the car. It was just a waste of money. I have had better luck with the Beck & Arnley rotors that mimic the newer OEM design with holes in the rotor hat area.
 

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If you do lots of searching of warped rotors you will find some excellent info confirming that it is rarely warped rotors but poor bedding of the pads that create an uneven surface over time.
I would like to believe that, but the first time I changed the rotors I made sure I bedded in the pads properly. I did multiple, I think it was 6, stops from 60mph to 10mph with little cooling time between stops. I think drove for 10 miles using the brakes as little as possible. All was well for a few months. Then the I got that dreaded pulsing pedal when braking hard.
 

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I don’t know why this knowledge is not more common but I believe that almost all cases of warped rotors are caused by “hot stops”. Whenever you stop with very hot rotors, which can happen in hilly or mountain driving, or even with one long hill descent say in SF, if you come to a complete stop for more than a couple of seconds and stay in one spot without moving, your brake pads cover one spot on the rotor, keeping it from cooling while the rest of the rotor is open to the air the uneven cooling will warp the rotor. It can happen to even new OEM rotors. To avoid warping, get in the habit of stopping a car length behind the car in front of you and let your car very slowly creep forwards at the light so the rotor can cool evenly. Make sense? Ask around. I typically get over 100k on my rotors because I refuse to turn them every time I change padS to get all the scratches out (the new pads will do that) If you have no warping, you have no need to turn them. If you do warp them then it’s usually cheaper to just buy the cheapest new rotors Than to pay to turn them, making them thinner and even easier to heat up and warp. They are just cheap cast iron even OEMS. Remember, red hot rotors are not the problem. Hot full, non moving stops are the culprit.
This makes sense, but it sounds like a workaround for poorly designed brakes. My prior car, and MDX, never had any issues with pedal pulsing. I drove on the very same roads.
 

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One other thing to mention, at least in my experience, is lug nut torque. Everytime I get my car serviced I check the lug torques and they are all over the place. Since I started checking them and making sure they are correct, I haven't had much warping at all.
 
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