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WHATS IN MY SPARK PLUG THREAD

3814 Views 93 Replies 23 Participants Last post by  bresodyssey
There is something stuck in my spark plug thread but I already pulled the old one out (it wasn't broken) and had a mechanic do a compression test on it but they checked and have all their pieces from their kit. I have tried using the spark plug socket, pliers, magnets, etc. This is the last spark plug I have to put in and no one can tell me how this thing got in there. It's also at the back of the engine and really hard to access. HELP please
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There is something stuck in my spark plug thread but I already pulled the old one out (it wasn't broken) and had a mechanic do a compression test on it but they checked and have all their pieces from their kit. I have tried using the spark plug socket, pliers, magnets, etc. This is the last spark plug I have to put in and no one can tell me how this thing got in there. It's also at the back of the engine and really hard to access. HELP please
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Get a bolt extractor set, one for small diameter bolts/ends, as they have teeth that will grab and remove stubborn bolts etc. Use downward force and slowly back out whatever it is from the threads. Once fully removed from threads you may need a magnet to pull it from the plug slot.


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After zooming in
It does not look like a plug.
Maybe a gasket that is inside your spark plug socket.
To hold the plug when it is out of its threads.
I did the same (zoom in). That has a hex head shape and tapers upward ... @white2015 , I'm pretty sure you're right: its the darn rubber thingy that is inside a generic spark plug socket. I've had them fall out (luckily with the socket not over the engine's spark plug tube.)

@bresodyssey , what was the result of all this?

OF
 

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I did the same (zoom in). That has a hex head shape and tapers upward ... @white2015 , I'm pretty sure you're right: its the darn rubber thingy that is inside a generic spark plug socket. I've had them fall out (luckily with the socket not over the engine's spark plug tube.)

@bresodyssey , what was the result of all this?

OF
Well then, how did they do a compression test? Can they use an adapter that doesn't screw into the spark plug hole threads?
After the compression test the OP tried to install the spark plugs and found the hole plugged up.
Unless he put his spark plug wrench into that hole BEFORE he put a spark plug in his wrench, I don't understand how that obstruction happened. Still, the helpful suggestions on how to remove, whatever it is, are good.
it will be interesting to see what it is and 'how' and 'when' it happened.
Some info definitely seems to be missing. :eek::(o_O:cool::geek:
Buffalo4
PS: I guess that while he was installing sparkplugs in the adjacent cyls the rubber plug may have dropped out of the socket and into the hole. I would think he would have realized that when he put the spark plug in the socket to do that cyl, as it wouldn't stay in the socket without that rubber plug. 🤯
 

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I guess that while he was installing sparkplugs in the adjacent cyls the rubber plug may have dropped out of the socket and into the hole. I would think he would have realized that when he put the spark plug in the socket to do that cyl, as it wouldn't stay in the socket without that rubber plug. 🤯
This was my thought process. :D

Great minds think alike. 😅 😁 👍 🍻

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wow, I am missing all the drama over here. I have heard of UFO's, but have not seen one lodge itself in the spark plug tube of Honda odyssey of all vehicles.

So lets for a second forget how it got there and concentrate on hot to get it out of there.
Did the shop put plugs back in after they did compression test?
Do you have mechanics mirror? Do you have a boroscope inspection camera? You got to find a way to better inspect whatever is in there.
Basically, you need to determine if the thing in there is wedged or screwed.
Poke it with a screwdriver while using a mirror, does it move? If so, get something like
Does not have to be magnetic, just use the spring legs to grab the object and get it out.

If you see a hex, then most likely its screwed in. In that case, you need to use deep socket, try various sizes until you get the one that grabs and spin it out.
Use either magnet or above tool to get it out once you unscrew it.

So many questions, so little time ......
 

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they checked and have all their pieces from their kit
The mechanic has the answer, whether he knows it or not.

Send him the picture - it may jog his memory.
 
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If compression in that cylinder would blow it out it would have come out long ago.........
Not if there is a hole in that plug. I would bet that if you crank the engine over now a lot or air comes out of that hole. Does it? Course you don't want to take the chance of it getting sucked in. :eek:
Is it possible that the plug was in the hole and you pushed it into the spark plug threaded hole while attempting to put in a new plug?
Either way, you need to get it out. Maybe even use a long lag type bolt that will screw into that rubber plug, or whatever it is and it might be able to pull it out, A left handed thread would be best, if they even make such a thing.

QUESTION? Did the mechanic do the compression test in his shop? If so, how did you get the Ody back to your place?
Buffalo4
 

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just use the spring legs to grab the object and get it out
those "spring legs" are very weak and don't hold something that's jammed pretty well.
Maybe even use a long lag type bolt that will screw into that rubber plug
yes, that could work, if it is the rubber plug. Even crochet hook would "hook" to the rubber...
Do you have a boroscope inspection camera?
that's the best way to determine what do to next. Observe first, scratch your head later.

General questions:
What happened to the car after the mechanic finished with compression test and owner found problem with spark plug?
What the car driven? was it towed as inoperable? Was it stored without being moved? Was that an "on-call" mechanic?
 

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I think it's the rubber inside the spark plug socket (designed to protect the spark plug when you pull it out). Get a spark plug socket with magnetic inside and you won't have this issue again.
Funny thing, my magnetic spark plug socket is a bit to strong so it can pull out my extension if I'm not careful... still much better than the rubber insert style. Its also a good idea to hit the spark plug ceramic with just a bit of dielectric grease / silicone lube to allow the spark plug boot to pop out easy the next time.

-Charlie
 
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(designed to protect the spark plug when you pull it out)
Technically it is for grabbing on to the spark plug primarily.

Funny thing, my magnetic spark plug socket is a bit to strong so it can pull out my extension if I'm not careful... still much better than the rubber insert style. Its also a good idea to hit the spark plug ceramic with just a bit of dielectric grease / silicone lube to allow the spark plug boot to pop out easy the next time.

-Charlie
Agreed. My rubber one broke off as they so commonly do while I was in the middle of reinstalling plugs in my old Accord. Luckily, it broke off in a way where if I put the socket back in the cylinder where it broke off in, it would come out with the spark plug, so getting it out wasn't very difficult. I went out that night and bought a magnetic Duralast socket from AutoZone instead. Haven't had an issue with it.
 

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Well then, how did they do a compression test? Can they use an adapter that doesn't screw into the spark plug hole threads?
After the compression test the OP tried to install the spark plugs and found the hole plugged up.
Unless he put his spark plug wrench into that hole BEFORE he put a spark plug in his wrench, I don't understand how that obstruction happened. Still, the helpful suggestions on how to remove, whatever it is, are good.
it will be interesting to see what it is and 'how' and 'when' it happened.
Some info definitely seems to be missing. :eek::(o_O:cool::geek:
Buffalo4
PS: I guess that while he was installing sparkplugs in the adjacent cyls the rubber plug may have dropped out of the socket and into the hole. I would think he would have realized that when he put the spark plug in the socket to do that cyl, as it wouldn't stay in the socket without that rubber plug. 🤯
Maybe they did not really do the test.
Was the OP actually there?
 
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Funny thing, my magnetic spark plug socket is a bit to strong so it can pull out my extension if I'm not careful... still much better than the rubber insert style. Its also a good idea to hit the spark plug ceramic with just a bit of dielectric grease / silicone lube to allow the spark plug boot to pop out easy the next time.

-Charlie
GEARWRENCH 3/8" Drive 6 Pt. 5/8" x 6" Magnetic Swivel Spark Plug Socket - 80546 $10.88 on Amazon now.
That's what I have. The 6" extension is not removeable from the socket. But, if you add an additional extension, it could pull out. Very handy and less than $15.
And I also use the dielectric grease.
Buffalo4
 

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We need a minute by minute timeline.
So many unanswered questions.

OP you still there?

I agree that is either a spark plug socket boot or the tip of a compression tester
 
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