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Discussion Starter #1
Honda has announced a new campaign to revamp it's powertrains over the next few years. The Ody V-6 would receive Direct-Injection and the next Gen Ody could receive a CVT. The DI would easily push horsepower up 5% and bump mpg's up 10%. It looked like Honda was going introduce 6 speed autos in other models starting with the '11 Ody Touring Models but now Honda has changed their tune and will likely follow Nissan in a quest to pursue Continuously Variable Transmissions for many models. Note that currently Honda is the only automaker to still offer a minivan with a 5 speed transmission; Toyota, Chrysler (including Chrysler, Dodge, and VW), and even Kia minivans all have a standard 6 speed auto. I hope they can get it together. The links are below.

Honda Worldwide | November 30, 2011 "Honda Announces Revolutionary Next-generation ?Earth Dreams Technology?"

Honda Previews New Engine Lineup: Direct Injection and CVTs Coming | AutoGuide.com News
 

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Honda changes are very sloooow. Look, some of us still own a 5AT, even the 2012 CR-V still has one, so I don't see it for next year

I foresee radical powertrain changes until the 5th generation Odyssey, especially due to the fact that the Odyssey is now 100% designed in the US, not Japan, so I bet they are not on the priority list :dunno:

As per the CVT, it better be good, Nissan's CVT has received an underwhelming response. I've driven a couple of rentals too, not nice.
 

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Any new tech will likely go on some acura. Either the rl or the mdx is my guess.
It's too bad Honda never put the turbo engine from the rdx in another car like tsx or civic
 

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I would think during the MMC that we could possibly see the 6 speed transmission be standard throughout the Odyssey lineup. I really hope they don't go CVT, never liked driving them. DI may happen at that time also
 

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I second you Jason.... CVT in my experience is not a pleasant experience, and I do hope DI is coming. It is a far more efficient design.
 

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^I third that. I've driven a rental Altima with the CVT and really didn't like the hesitation.
 

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Found this from 2009. Honda didn't sound like they had anything imminent even back then.

Last week, in our post on Hyundai’s new DI (Direct Injection) Theta II engine, we questioned Honda’s long-standing engine technology leadership. We also assumed (wrongly) that they would be joining the DI club shortly, given the advantages DI technology affords. Turns out we weren’t the only ones wondering, except that in the case of auto, motor und sport, they weren’t asking it rhetorically, but the person in the know: Honda CEO Takanobu Ito. In an interview with Europe’s leading car magazine (print edition), Ito gave DI a pass with his answer to the question: “Honda was once the leader with its internal combustion engines. Did your competitors overtake you with gasoline Direct Injection?” In classic corporate speak, rather than directly acknowledge DI or his competitors, Ito had this to say:
We have limited resources, and we are concentrating on Hybrids. We want to build the optimal engines for hybrids. And if we’re going to talk about hybrids, we have to talk about the costs for the consumer. Hybrids are very expensive. The fact that our hybrids (Insight) are selling so well in Japan is because of government incentives.
Well, the part about why the Insight is selling well in Japan was refreshingly candid, given its poor sales in the US versus the Prius. Ito goes on to share the dilemma facing Honda (and presumably others) in dealing with tightening efficiency demands and expectations:
One option would be to make cars smaller and lighter. But the consumer will not accept any compromises in comfort. So given the demands to reduce CO emissions and the expectations of continued gas price increases, adopting hybrid technology (further) is simply easier.
Just one problem with that, as we see it: why is Hyundai implementing both DI and hybrid technology?

But then I found this from last month which sounds far more encouraging:

Much has been said about the new Honda Civic receiving a list of early updates in a bid to silence critics while restoring the car’s class-leading fuel economy. This has all but been confirmed, with the Japanese automaker revealing an entire new lineup of engines and transmissions at a press briefing held at the Twin Ring Motegi Racing Circuit on the eve of the Tokyo Motor Show.
In total, Honda unveiled five all-new engines, ranging from a new Kei car 660 cc motor, to a flagship 3.5-liter V6 powertrain. With these engines Honda has said it is committed to being both a leader in
fuel economy
and engine output.
Engines destined for North America include a new 1.5-liter, 1.8-liter and 2.4-liter 4-cylinder, as well as a 3.5-liter V6. Across the board, all will receive direct-injection
technology
. The 4-cylinder engines gain a new VTEC arrangement with an Atkinson cycle lower load cam plus extensive friction reduction technologies. The result on a car like the Civic will be a 10 percent improvement in fuel economy, plus a 5 percent increase in power over the current model. The same goes for the 2.4-liter, which one Honda representative told us the new 2012 CR-V just missed out on receiving.
As for the
V6 engine
, it will replace both the current 3.5-liter and 3.7-liter engines, combining the best technologies of both, including a cylinder deactivation system while gaining direct injection. Honda provided a preliminary, and conservative, estimated power output with 310-hp and 265 lb-ft of torque, with a much stronger torque band.
Of note, all of the engines included a start-stop function, although no decision has been made by Honda as to whether we’ll see this technology in North America.
Apart from the new dual-clutch 7-speed transmission (integrated into a new SH-AW, discussion of automatics at the Honda event was non-existent. Instead, Honda revealed several new CVTs (and yes, they can hear you groaning in Motegi). Of note is a new CVT designed for compact cars, as well as another for mid-size, meaning you should look for CVTs to find their way into cars like the Civic,
Accord
and CR-V soon. As terrible as all this may sound for Honda owners dreading the thought of a CVT, the good news is what Honda is calling “G-Design Shift”, which was created to help deliver more immediate throttle response. We did have the change to test out the new CVT in a 2.4-liter direct-injection TSX but we can’t tell you about it until the embargo lifts next week. Stay tuned.
 

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maybe I'm the ONLY one here that likes nissan's CVT. :)

If people tested/drives the 4 cylinder CVT on altima or rogue well then I would side you guys- its not the best. BUT if we are talking about the CVT on V6 models (altima, murano) thats completely different story. they are smooth. hesitation on CVT? thats really odd
 

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I used to have an Audi a4 with cvt. Driving with the cvt was ok but I was always concerned about reliability. I had to replace the transmission shortly after warranty. I also read about reliability issues with other a4 owners. But I think it was not only a4 cvt issues as I read when looking at muranos with cvts there have been several complaints about failure. Honda cvts might be better but for now I'll stick with regular automatics.


Sent from my Autoguide iPhone app
 

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BUT if we are talking about the CVT on V6 models (altima, murano) thats completely different story. they are smooth. hesitation on CVT? thats really odd
Feels like driving a golf kart...

Honda cvts might be better
All backed up with Honda's impeccable history of regular automatic transmissions' durability and reliability

:stupid:
 

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Ya your probably right, but I'll give them a chance to prove themselves before judging. In the meantime, I'll stick with regular autos.

Feels like driving a golf kart...



All backed up with Honda's impeccable history of regular automatic transmissions' durability and reliability

:stupid:
 

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Just my thoughts.
I don't care if there is an option to have 6 cute little monkeys come out of the back and push when under 5MPH, just give me a button or menu to turn off what I don't like. NAVI "OK" and DRL included.....
 

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I guess I can't blame Honda for not disclosing when DI would be offered. In our case, I'd definitely put off buying a 2012 Odyssey if I knew for sure that DI was coming for 2013. On the other hand, CVT sounds controversial enough that maybe some people would buy a 2012 if they knew that CVT was coming in 2013.
 

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More information from Car and Driver:

Despite Honda’s reputation for building great engines, the Japanese automaker has been slow to adopt direct injection (DI). The technology is now commonplace in all segments of the market, and allows for higher compression ratios and therefore improved efficiency. At an event surrounding the Tokyo auto show, Honda has told us that it is finally ready to add this feature to its engines. Besides DI, the engines also will feature a stop/start system.
At the top of the line is a redesigned 3.5-liter V-6, which features cylinder shutdown and a two-stage oil pump. With at least 308 hp and 266 lb-ft of torque, this engine delivers more power than Honda’s existing 3.7-liter engine and should yield a fuel-economy improvement of about 10 percent.
Honda also announced a new series of continuously variable transmissions that supposedly reduce the annoyances we expect of this type of gearbox. The new CVTs—one is intended for mid-size and compact cars, the other for Japanese-market microcars—promise quicker response to throttle inputs, which should mean smoother acceleration and less of the irritating rubber-band feeling that occurs when the engine revs climb before there’s any noticeable change in speed. It’s a story of incremental gains here, made mostly through a wider belt (30 millimeters versus the current Honda CVT’s 24 mm) that reduces surface pressure, redesigned grooves in the pulley that better retain transmission fluid, and more precise control of the hydraulic pump. The ratio spread also is increased for better fuel economy.
When exactly we’ll see these engines and transmissions in showrooms hasn’t been announced, but we expect them to start entering the lineup sometime in the next two years. In typical fashion, Honda won’t make any claims about actual efficiency numbers or performance relative to its competitors, but we suspect that these updated powertrains will burnish Honda’s engine-building reputation and put its cars near the top of the fuel-economy heap.

So, no CVT for the Odyssey,
 

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More information from Car and Driver:

At the top of the line is a redesigned 3.5-liter V-6, which features cylinder shutdown and a two-stage oil pump. With at least 308 hp and 266 lb-ft of torque, this engine delivers more power than Honda’s existing 3.7-liter engine and should yield a fuel-economy improvement of about 10 ...,
This will probably be in the next gen ody.

Too bad I can't wait that long to get it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I hope Honda does something soon to address all the issues with the current transmissions on the odyssey. They need to fix the issues or change the trannies quick. Bring on traditional 7-8 speed autos that Hyundai and Chrysler and Audi are using or get the CVTs out. Why is Honda taking a back seat to all the others? Come on Honda! We are waiting.....
 
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