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I've got a question about operation of AC system after new compressor has been installed. I had the dealer replace my ac compressor '06 Odyssey touring. It's not blowing as cold as it was prior to compressor change. The clutch and coil failed for the second time and I opted for a completely new compressor for the warranty aspect ( it's why the dealer did the work ). Total cost was 950 for compressor and installation.

I have to return the van monday so they can find out why the system isn't blowing as cold as it should. Does anyone know what the temp coming out of the vents up front is supposed to be while the ac is at max cooling ?

Thanks
 

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Just did a 2005 EXL with 140000+ miles last night. Once I quit fighting the small space and pulled the tensioner it was a breeze. Off to get the system refilled today. To echo others.
1. Just remove the tensioner. It is SO much easier
2. The plastic clips are stupid. Really. Glad I bought new ones on amazon.
3. 3.5 hours, saved $1100. I will NEVER make that kind of money per hour....

Thanks again CNN and all of the others who share their knowledge!

I am in Omaha too. Love your write ups. Have referenced this sight for brakes, power steering pump, spark plugs and now AC. Next up is transmission flush. Going for 200K and as few mechanics bills as possible.

Eric
 

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I have a 2006 EXL with 190000+and the compressor quite. Replacing compressor with remanufactured Denso 471-1630 from Amazon, about $150 but still with
1 yr warranty. Not sure about receiver/dryer, if I should replace or not. Does anyone know the difficulty in changing one. Also should the expansion valve be
changed as well?
 

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Ok, I am not a mechanic but don't like wasting $1350 to replace my compressor and condenser for a failed clutch. I attempted to replace my entire compressor and was unable to remove it from the engine compartment. I had the splash guard and front passenger tire and wheel well liner out but could not pass it by the bushing where the bottom of the tensioner was. How do I get it out of there?
 

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Ok, I am not a mechanic but don't like wasting $1350 to replace my compressor and condenser for a failed clutch. I attempted to replace my entire compressor and was unable to remove it from the engine compartment. I had the splash guard and front passenger tire and wheel well liner out but could not pass it by the bushing where the bottom of the tensioner was. How do I get it out of there?
I had the same problem and worked and worked at it, never finding the magic angle to remove it. How to fix...easy! Unbolt the tensioner and take that out of there. Once that is out of the way, it only took me a couple minutes to get the compressor rotated to the correct angle to drop out of there.
 

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The 5.5 mm bolt issue: if you strip both of these bolts, simply use an Allen-head bolt (Lowes, Home Depot has it). Best is to use stainless steel bolts.

I posted info in the other thread:
http://www.odyclub.com/forums/52-2005-2010-odyssey/201609-05-odyssey-ac-compressor.html
They wouldn't strip out if they actually WERE 5.5mm! There was a little play in the socket when I had it on. I also noticed the compressor I bought was the wrong one. The holes to mount the receiver for the low pressure line was for two 12mm bolts and would not have been compatible for the smaller bolts. I had to reinstall the old compressor and drive home from the shop the hobby shop on base. BTW the hobby shop on Quantico is not helpful nor instructional like the one in Camp Lejuene. Great facility but most of the guys in there are content to watch you struggle mightily unless you are a regular or a really experienced mechanic (they were actually helping the guy next to me who had a much different experience).
That said, I thought I needed a lift and needed to remove the front passenger tire, are both of those necessary? Is it possible to do the job from my garage with stands and a jack? I am not keen on returning to that hobby shop but if I can do it without a lift I will try it from home. What do you think?
 

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I had a seized Ac compressor clutch. I metered everything and couldn't figure why the clutch wouldn't engage. Diagnosis at a shop plus evacuation was around $100 but it confirmed the clutch bad and said I needed a who,e new compressor since they won't replace clutch only. They wanted $1384.26 on top of that for the whole job. The quote included servicing post repair at a cost of $80. When I called back for the same service after DIY repair he wanted $175! No doubt because he didn't get the big money on the repair job, but that dishonesty drove me to base where I paid a third of that. So for the $1484 mechanic quote and my DIY $508.28 (would have been $112 cheaper if I only replaced the descant filter instead of whole condenser and didn't waste 1.5hrs of lift rental while I drilled one of the stripped 5.5mm bolts out). Looks like the Base Hobby Shop is going to be my greatest retirement benefit, already saved me $975.72! Next job is brakes and rotors, I almost want to get a quote for a laugh. BTW thank you for the advice on removing the tensioner, the part came right out that way.
New Compressor $255.60 ($503 + $240 labor = $743) Dealer price $730 for part only!
Condenser $139.50 ($190 = part and labor)
O-rings $4.50
Pag Oil $8.10
PB Blaster $6.30
Vacuum and recharge $62.28
Lift Rental base hobby shop $32
 

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I had the same problem and worked and worked at it, never finding the magic angle to remove it. How to fix...easy! Unbolt the tensioner and take that out of there. Once that is out of the way, it only took me a couple minutes to get the compressor rotated to the correct angle to drop out of there.
JamesInLv following your advise I removed the tensioner. Rotated it once or twice and then,Bobs your Uncle, it came right out!
 

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Just did this over the weekend. Couple notes. Slow and steady (but firm) pressure on the tensioner is key here. Two people involved with the belt removal is a big help. Once the belt was off i removed the tensioner completely to make way for the removal of the AC Compressor itself. Thanks for the awesome write up!
 

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I had problem with the 5.5mm bolts too. Stripped one out and had to actually drill holes into the old compressor to free the bracket. Went down to Lowes and found the M6 x 16mm allen head bolt. It worked perfectly and I replaced both of the new allen bolts in case I ever need to get them off again.
 

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Question: When you drained the new compressor of oil. What port do I refill the compressor up with? Suction or discharge port? Does it matter?
 

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Hey everyone, Noob question and situation here.
First of all, cnn, thank you for the awesome guide, I plan on using it to replace my compressor. But, before I do, let me tell you the symptoms, and maybe get some advice on if I'm going down the right track.
This is for our 2007 Odyssey, BTW. EX-L Trim.
About a few months ago (dead of winter), we started hearing whining coming from the engine upon start up. It would occur in the freezing cold. I know AC is used as part of the Defrost, and we certainly would power that up in the morning to help defrost the window. Anyway, the whining would go on for awhile, then cease. Well, that sound finally ceased.
As temperatures have risen, we finally hit a few days where the AC would have kept the cabin cool, but alas, nothing but lukewarm air coming out. That is with the AC fully on.

The troubleshooting began:
I have done AC work on my Subaru, and got a kit to check the pressure of the Low Pressure Port, and refill it, as I thought this might be the problem. When I hooked up the gauge, the pressure was over 300psi. When I turned on the AC in the van, it didn't drop at all. As I understand it, the pressure should equalize.
I then did something I didn't know I shouldn't do. Didn't realize 134a was bad stuff (thought it was CNC free, or whatever). I vented a ton of the stuff out of the low side port, bringing the pressure down to where the gauge said it should be. I now know this was totally the wrong thing to do, so sorry to the tree huggers out there. My bad.
After I had vented it down, I shut the engine down, let it rest, and then went to turn it back on. With the AC on the pressure was again in the 300+psi range. Strange stuff.
I have checked to make sure the clutch is engaging when the AC is on. It does. I can hear the relay click it, and see it spinning.
With the engine turned off, I have checked the clutch manually. It has been said that you should feel the resistance of a pump when turning it by hand. There is no resistance. I feel the resistance of the clutch itself (it doesn't spin like a flywheel or anything), but not the engaging of the pump.
I also have noticed that the cap for the low pressure side gets VERY hard to take off. I also noticed that there is a slight wheezing coming out of the low port. That is with the engine off. I'm thinking the slight leak in the low port is pressurizing the cap when it is on, and that is what makes it hard to take off.

So, with all of that said, it sounds like the compressor itself is bad. Would the low pressure port also be bad, or is that a symptom? I know the caps are designed to help "seal" the port, so is that normal behavior?

I just wanted verification that this is the case, and I can get the work done. My local Tunex shop will do recover for 20 bucks, and from what I've read and seen, I shouldn't have any problems doing the vacuum and recharge myself.

Thanks in advance for any advice and thoughts.
 

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I have a 06 Odyssey EXL with 142k. The a/c compressor was not cycling on at all, I found that I had no power to the compressor, so I ordered and replaced the stator set, once I got the compressor running I check the pressures with my gauges, the low side was extremely high and the high side very low, which indicates that the compressor is bad. I have only had it for about 1 1/2 years. When I bought it from the individual he made a comment it me that the A/C had been worked on, what was done I do not know, I had just assumed it was serviced. I have not seen any leaks so I don't think the system has been exposed to the atmosphere any. After reading the info from this thread I have ordered Denso Compressor 471-1630 off amazon. My concern is with the high mileage, do I need to replace the Desiccant bag in the condenser, or any other parts? I live in AZ and there is not much moisture but with the failure of the compressor I am worried that I should flush the condenser & hoses, or if it's really that big of a deal?
 

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Leaks can't always be seen so that's not really a valid test. What's the static system pressure on the gauges when the system is off?

With you not knowing then it would be a good idea flush the system. If you suspect the compressor is damaged then it's possible it has sent pieces into the condenser and the receiver dryer. This can turn into an expensive fix, unfortunately.

A couple of other things to check to possibly determine why the compressor failed would be the compressor relay. These like to stick closed and the compressor will stay on all the time, even with the key off. This can build very high pressures in the system when in use, along with draining the battery when they key is off.

Also, make sure the fans are running BOTH on low and high speed. It may be tricky to check high speed if the pressure in the system won't get to 221psi but it's important as without a fan running the system pressures will go very high at idle. The fan circuits are not simple either but it's important to make sure they're running properly both on low speed and high speed.
 

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Quick question (my mechanic might be swindling me):

My A/C went out. I took my car to a mechanic to test for leaks, and he pointed out that the compressor was melted.

Now, the problem is that he said I need several parts -- receiver drier, expansion valve, and condensor -- along with the compressor, and only because he said that if the compressor goes bad then those parts are contaminated.

Is that mechanic telling the truth, or can I get away with just replacing the compressor?
 

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Quick question (my mechanic might be swindling me):

My A/C went out. I took my car to a mechanic to test for leaks, and he pointed out that the compressor was melted.

Now, the problem is that he said I need several parts -- receiver drier, expansion valve, and condensor -- along with the compressor, and only because he said that if the compressor goes bad then those parts are contaminated.

Is that mechanic telling the truth, or can I get away with just replacing the compressor?
Your mechanic knows his stuff. When the compressor suffers internal damage the pieces of the compressor will get lodged in the condenser. In older cars you could flush out the condenser but in newer cars, like our Ody's, the condenser coil tubes are so tiny inside that the flush will not remove the pieces and contaminants.

It only takes one very tiny piece of contaminant to get through the condenser and lodged in the expansion valve to make the expansion valve not work. The expansion valve is a very small orifice that keeps high pressure on one side and creates a low pressure on the other side. That's what causes the evaporator to remove heat from the air and blow cold air into the car. It's the pressure differential created by the expansion valve. It's a very tiny orifice inside the expansion valve.

The receiver/dryer is basically a desiccant bag for removing moisture (much like those found in the box with new electronics) from the system. That receiver dryer should be replaced when the system is opened and especially if there is any chance that there are contaminants in it.

So, if the compressor has a meltdown it is highly recommended to replace the receiver/dryer, condenser, and expansion valve. They'll probably flush the evaporator (the coil inside the car that gets cold) and then replace the rest of it. If this is not done then it only takes one small piece of contaminant to plug the system, cause the pressures to go extremely high, and ruin your new compressor.

So, no, your mechanic is not taking you for a ride. He is fixing your system the correct way so you don't come back with the same problem in a week.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Quick question (my mechanic might be swindling me):

My A/C went out. I took my car to a mechanic to test for leaks, and he pointed out that the compressor was melted.

Now, the problem is that he said I need several parts -- receiver drier, expansion valve, and condensor -- along with the compressor, and only because he said that if the compressor goes bad then those parts are contaminated.

Is that mechanic telling the truth, or can I get away with just replacing the compressor?
"Compressor Melted" is an issue with Honda CRV fitted with Keihin AC Compressor.
Google "CRV Black Death" and read about it.

"Compressor Melted" is usually not an issue with Denso compressor but possible.
Get a 2nd opinion.

What is your symptom?

Chances are you need only the AC Compressor (DIY in forum).
 

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Quick Question:

I've taken everything apart -- compressor and condenser/dryer are out of the car.

Should I get my hoses and system cleaned/vacuumed before attaching the new compressor and condenser/dryer? Or will a shop be able to clean out the contaminants in such a way that won't contaminate the new parts?

Mainly I'm wondering if I should attach my new parts first ... OR ... take the van to a shop with the parts disconnected.

Is there a way I can clean the hoses myself before re-attaching them?

There were contaminants through the system (thanks to the bad compressor), the hoses are good and I don't want to get new ones.
 
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